Hot answers tagged

24

Requiring an extra visa or exit permit from citizens is not very common today but historically, that's why passports were invented (and not to restrict immigration) and the reason for that is simple: a large population was seen as the bedrock of power. You need many young people (and especially men) for labor-intensive industries and for the army. In many ...


15

Here is a really interesting site that attempts to explain all the problems that Chinese citizens suffer in order to travel abroad: http://www.why-so-hard-chinese-travel-abroad.com/ Much of it seems to be down to difficulty and cost of acquiring a passport and visas. Passport acquisition: Requires multiple visits to home province irrespective of where the ...


9

There is no SanXingDui art museum in Chengdu, you have to go to GuangHan. The "museum" displayed by google maps is a store. Source: I asked friends. They confirm that the place in the streetview below at the location reported by google is a store and that the real museum is the one out of town in GuangHan. Details: Google does report a SanXingDui art ...


9

Hopefully this wont provoke any politically charged responses, but I believe it (at least to some minor extent) has to do with keeping Chinese people in China. It's very well known that the living conditions in some parts of China, and in some professions (think factory workers) are very bad compared to most of the western world. If you look at ...


6

I don't know about an online resource for these places, but I actually found them pretty easy to find in bigger cities. While walking around I often saw them, even randomly in Shanghai. What I would do is, copy this photo onto your phone and then show it to locals, or even better your hotel reception. Even without speaking any English, people were always ...


5

You can still travel by cargo ship between China and Thailand, but it is limited to 2 foreigners per ship and takes some 24 hours, as they go slow and anchor for the night along the way. This method is basically catch as catch can. The captains wait until they have a decent load then sail. So it is not something you can book in advance or check availability ...


4

The excellent answer by @PeterHahndorf has inspired me for a viable solution: The ticket office in the picture he provides reads "火车票代售点" i.e. railway ticket selling point. Searching for this (the Chinese phrase!) on baidu maps gives a good selection of such offices, including the one I had found. Screenshot of map.baidu.com searching for "火车票代售点" in ...


4

It depends on when the summer school will actually be and up to when you need to attain the required visa. I can see one of the following options: Applying for the visa before you leave for Rome, hoping to get the passport back in time. Attempt to pay more for quicker processing If it doesn’t work, attempt to request it back Applying for the visa after ...


4

In addition to what you say, the procedures for Chinese visa are also quite volatile over time, so be sure to check the sources for updates and try your luck. The best info I found is on the excellent Caravanistan site for China-visa. There you find a section with the latest updates on getting visa on the road from not only Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan but ...


3

Your question is quite broad and not completely clear, but I assume you arrive from Kazakhstan and want to cross at Khogas into China and then drive on to Beijing and/or Shanghai. I'm no expert but I will try to give you some pointers. Comments to start with: For any venture through the Stans be sure to study the excellent Caravanistan site. Have you ...


3

First of all, there is no reason that your child needs to "give up Chinese citizenship" at any point. The idea that countries "allow" or "don't allow" dual nationality is a misconception. Countries just have various rules for gain and loss of their nationality. Each nationality is separate. According to Chinese (PRC) Nationality Law, if your child was born ...


3

It does not seem so. At least not related to the free trade agreement. It likely depends on politics and those are hardly forecastable. First of all, the 10-year visa for Chinese citizens you refer to were not agreed upon in ChAFTA, the free trade agreement you mention. You can find the text of that here. Annex 10-A has the commitments of Australia "on the ...


2

Regarding pricing Rome2Rio gives a similar price estimate of RMB200-240. But given that timing is crucial for you, you should probably arrange a driver beforehand who will then wait for you at the wall and take a nap while you hike around and then take you back into town. I find it unlikely that this would even cost that much more than twice your price ...


2

Good idea to check with your hotel receptionist about where to find the nearest railway ticket agency if you live in a hotel in China which is allowed to host foreigners.


2

Let's start with your first question - Has it been banned in China? A: China has tried to ban them, but some people keep doing it anyway. A year ago, the Chinese government sought again to ban these burials as tourist sites — this is legislative stuff that apparently doesn’t stick. Over the years, there have been gaps in this protection. But now ...


2

The existing answers treat China as if the situation there is very fundamentally different from other countries (like the US). However, residents from both countries have areas that they need a visa for, and areas that don't need a visa/permit at all. Sure, the no-visa country list is shorter for China than the US, but the chinese list will likely keep ...


2

As you are not UK citizens, it's up to you which nationality you choose to present when entering the UK. This means you can apply for a UK visa with a Chinese passport if you so wish, although as I'm sure you're aware there's a fair amount of hassle and expense involved. Alernatively, you could just travel via a third country as outlined in "Case 3" of ...


1

Like others have said, even if you change your plans not only will no one notice, but even if they did, it's perfectly normal to change your plans half-way during a trip, there are no rules against it. They ask for itineraries to see if you have some vague purpose to your visit, not because those are the only things you'll be allowed to do. I would suggest ...


1

I bought a SIM card from a street vendor stall. It's difficult for non-nationals to register a SIM card which must be done prior to using one. For foreigners, the vendor would typically register it himself and sell to you with a somewhat higher mark up. You need to make sure that the SIM card is registered and test it on your phone before walking away. After ...


1

I had no problem getting a sim card at Unicom. I had to pay for a month though, which was 26 Yuan. That got me text, talk, and 600MB of data for a month.



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