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5

You have plenty of options. To get a first idea look at this ethnolinguist map of China (courtesy wikipedia) and that is far too large-scale to map all the minorities that are out there. A comprehensive answer is out of scope so below I will give you some ideas. In any case you could either get on an organized tour or organize your travel by yourself. For ...


5

I went to China and didn't have a single problem. There are a few measures you can take to avoid problems: Wash your hands carefully (I guess this is applicable everywhere). Don't go and eat directly too exotic foods. Leave a bit of time to your body to get used to Asian food. Alternate food you are used to with more exotic food so that the shock for your ...


5

Lipulekh Pass is the only place in Uttarakhand, India where the border crossing is allowed into China. But this is allowed only for the pilgrims that are part of The Kailash Mansarovar Yatra, a pilgrimage to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar. It is very unlikely that other people (other than pilgrims) are allowed in this route.


5

I have now received answers from two official sources, Edinburgh and London offices. It was impossible to get through to anyone in London on the phone but they responded to an email on the same day: Dear Johnny Baloney, Thank you for contacting Chinese Visa Application Service Centre. As an EU national, you are not required to provide any ...


4

You need to prove that you are legally resident in the UK, not simply a tourist or other short-term visitor. China requires that visa applicants apply from their country of citizenship or residence. Many documents will suffice for this; for instance, a work or student visa, indefinite leave to remain, asylum approval, etc. For an EU citizen, your EU ...


2

To add to the other answer: For a mainland/Hong Kong/Macau resident to travel to Taiwan, they will need a "中華民國臺灣地區入出境許可證" ("Exit & Entry Permit for the Taiwan Area of the Republic of China") from the ROC authorities. However, mainland residents going directly from the mainland will also need to get a "大陆居民往来台湾通行证" (not sure about the translation; ...


2

I visited several places in China and had no problems. I will admit that I stayed in some nice hotels and took the obvious precaution of drinking bottled water. That said, general hygiene considerations such as washing your hands and then being aware of what you are touching afterwards is important. The door handle for the toilet being one thing to watch ...


1

They never have said anything about our taking side trips that we didn't list on our visa applications (Trips we hadn't planned at the time of the application.) The application also only asks about your current trip--no matter how long your visa is good for. If you make another trip on the same visa there's nothing that even asks for your itinerary. We ...


1

Long story short, mainland China (PRC) and Taiwan (ROC) don't recognize each other so they don't want to stamp each others passports / stick visa in there. The pragmatical workaround in place right now is that both nations issue another document to visitors from the other country (i.e. like a visa, but on its own piece of paper in my overly simplified ...


1

Yes you may but evidence suggests it does not make sense. In general Chinese embassies prefer you apply from your home country or your country of residence (proof of residence required/asked for). Hong Kong (and maybe similarly Macau) used to be a loophole around this with quick and inexpensive visas for China, but this since has changed, see here for HK. ...


1

According to information from 2012, there are 10 buses per day. The cost is 400-450 roubles, which was around $15 during 2012.



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