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8

There are other ferry companies operating in the area. A thorough search of Google should find these. Also, consider investing in a quality guide book like the ones from Rough Guides. When we travelled the length of Chile in 2003, we decided to ferry from Puerto Montt to Chaiten and then we went with buses down the Carretera Austral to Coyhaique and from ...


6

We have traveled Chile for a month. If you don't speak Spanish you will at times have difficulties communicating. Not everybody speak English. A lot however do speak English and the are also quite a lot who speak German and French. Even if people don't speak English they often remain quite friendly and you can go a long way with foot and hand language. Often ...


6

Your best bet is on a site like findacrew. I've had a friend do it this way - she overlanded from London to NZ, and used findacrew for the ocean parts inbetween. Generally there are categories of sailors on it - from beginner to expert, and as you've mentioned, you're already skilled. This will give you a considerable advantage. Thinking about it, ...


6

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


6

The Costanera Center is the best future bet for such facilities. The tower itself is still under construction. It will be 300 meters high and South Amarica's tallest building. It seems likely that it will at least have an observation platform of some kind. Currently available are several apartment hotels with rooftop swimming pools and lounges. You would of ...


6

A group of us went to Chile back in 2010, and one of my friends split off from us to visit it for a few days. It's only open one weekend a month, from memory, but he thought it was brilliant, and if I return to Chile I'd be very keen to try and get there. At the time, he had tried written/online contacts, but eventually called them from when we were in an ...


5

There are buses. At the very least, you can get a bus 1.5 hours west to Calama, which has a bigger exchange. A member of our party did that in August (winter) and got to Antofagasta, Iquique and more. The bus companies in Chile/Bolivia don't have much online presence - it's far easier to just get one in the town - but go as early as possible when you know ...


5

According to the website of the Chilean Ministry of Foreign Affairs, visa applications are handled either by a consulate (embassies also act as consulates, but usually there are additional consulates) or the Department of Immigration. There doesn't seem to be any consulates near you, so you'll have to contact the Department of Immigration. The page I linked ...


5

I hope someone with more experience can come along with a better answer, but since this is happening to you now I can cut/paste the official advice from the government there You must replace your tourist card if it has been lost or stolen. You are required to surrender the tourist card to International Police officers at the time you exit Chile. If ...


5

You should not rely on US Government to act on this in 2014. It is far more likely that if it will happen in 2014 it will be late in the year and it might be better to apply and get a B visa instead of waiting for VWP to happen. There is a recommendation by the State Department to the Santiago embassy to: Informal Recommendation 20: Embassy Santiago ...


5

Part of this may depend on where you are renting the car from. For example, if you're renting in El Calafate, it's pretty common for people to take cars over the border into Chile to go to Torres del Paine. While the permits and necessary steps might vary between different car rental companies, the offices for all the car rental companies should be able to ...


4

According to this webpage http://www.policia.cl/extranjeria/portada.htm International Police office it's located at Eleuterio Ramirez 852, between Serrano street and San Francisco street. There are about 3 blocks from Alameda Bernardo O'Higgins street (the main street in Santiago) and it's near to Universidad de Chile. I hope this information helps you, ...


4

You may have to change buses once or twice. After all, these are in two different countries. The website you cite has connections between Torres del Paine and Puerto Natales as well as Puerto Natales and El Calafate in Argentina. Buses between El Calafate and El Chalten in the Los Glaciares park are frequent. However, you can get more direct transportation ...


3

I have not been to Chile, and I do speak Spanish. But let me offer some general advice on traveling in countries where you don't speak the language: How effectively you can communicate is largely up to you. There likely are exceptions in some parts of the world, but in most places, people are happy to try to communicate with you. Most "necessary" ...


3

I asked around on the InterNations Santiago community, and I came across a couple of additional suggestions: Giratorio Restaurant is probably exactly what you are looking for. The restaurant is located in Providencia on the 16th floor, and it rotates to afford a 360° view of the city. According to SantiagoGourmet.com, it's rather pricey at about US$40 per ...


3

One idea that might be fun is to take the funicular rail to the top of Cerro San Cristóbal. You would probably have to bring food with you – there aren't really any restaurants at the top; just a few empanada vendors. But there are tables and chairs set up there where you could look out over the city as you are enjoying your meal. The funicular costs 2 ...


3

When I was preparing tour to Europe (Schengen area), it seems that travel insurance proof is mandatory for visitor of my country (Singapore). However travel insurance is not that expensive (less than 30 USD), and at that time I just obtained it from any ATM in Singapore (it is not mandatory to buy it from a travel agency). The tour agency should provide her ...


3

To request a duplicate copy of your tourist card ("Tarjeta Unica Migratoria" or sometimes "Tarjeta de Turismo"), you'll need to visit the extranjeria office. The office is located at Eleuterio Ramirez N° 852 in centro. Note that they are open from 8 AM until 2 PM. Also, make sure you bring a pen with you. To get there via Metro, take the red line to ...


2

If you Google for the Spanish term "escuela de buceo comercial chile", on of the top five hits is this school here, which offers such courses. they take 6 weeks. They are located in Talcahuano, Chile. You need to consider that surface supplied diving is very expensive and complicated. The equipment required for this is a huge factor in this. See wikipedia ...


2

You may have to use other methods of converting to Chilean Peso from Paraguayan Guarani. The only exchange place I found listing the currency for exchange is Casa de Cambio JCTOUR.CL. You can look at the listings on Casas de Cambios en Chile page to see where they are located.


2

Yes there are. There are several bus lines that I could find online though I could only find 1 that provides cross border routes: Buses Pacheco If you look at their schedule you will find that they have a bus from Puerto Natales to El Calafate and a connecting bus from Punta Arenas to Puerto Natales though I can't find the trip duration so it is ...


2

Having appropriate travel health insurance is indeed one requirement for Schengen visas. Regarding documentation and the like, you don't need anything particularly mysterious but you should be able to show that you are coming for tourism (hotel confirmations, etc.) and have enough money to cover your stay. The things you mention in your question should be ...


2

I would be rather curious about how your girlfriend would get deported if she can't enter without a visa. There is a website Italian Foreign Ministry that allows applicants to determine whether or not they need a visa. And if you check on the site it will show that she will need to provide the proof of duration of stay. Basically usually referred to proof ...


1

I just talked to my friend, who used to live in Chile. He (a Bangladeshi citizen) traveled a lot in this very route. According to him, this is a very unusual case. He never faced something like that. Even crossing border (for Peru, or Argentina), sometimes there's no need to show passport. Also, no visa required. I guess the driver had "something" on his ...


1

Consider using a small, not-so-well-known rental company. Big companies often have rules laid down by the legal/controlling/compliance department that branches have to follow, no exceptions allowed. One way that smaller competitors that lack the brand recognition can compete is through flexibility. In November, I did a 2 week trip starting in Chile and ...


1

There's a place in Santiago that is famous for having lots and lots of casas de cambio, which is located on Agustinas near Paseo Ahumada, about 2 blocks south of Plaza de Armas: Along Agustinas, you will find lots and lots of places that exchange money: If anybody in Santiago is going to buy Paraguayan Guaranies, you'll find them there. Unfortunately, ...


1

Santiago - Iquique takes about 22 hours by bus with the companies Pullman or Turbus and 2 hours by plane with Skyairline or LAN


1

Iquique is a good start point to get to the Atacama Giant. See a possible itinerary to get there.



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