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5

A late-ish answer with some random thoughts after a 30+ hr transit with 2 3 year-old boys (LAX - Dubai - Johannesburg). Use potty breaks to take a walk around, although my boys didn't want to run around as much as I had feared. If the kids are asleep, try to sleep yourself and not "catch up" on movies/tv/books/etc. Quickly learn how to access the kids ...


1

May depend on country but in my experience an infant doesn't get named as they don't get a seat of their own (whereas from age 2 a child does). I doubt it'll cause any problems.


2

As @andra mentions, it is commonly accepted that flying East is more complicated. I am the exact opposite. When I was flying routinely from Europe to the US (for about 10 years) I usually landed about 15:00 or 16:00 local time (which was about 22:00 at home / body time) and tried many times to follow the advice "stay up until the night". This ended up me ...


6

There are specific requirements per country in EU. EasyJet has a good page on that. Note that minors (< 18 yo) flying from Portugal are covered by one of the specific entries in the page I linked.


21

There's no definitive answer to this and it will vary by country and airline. This is what the UK Civil Aviation Authority says: http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=2207&pageid=12706 From a safety point of view children (it doesn't specify an age) SHOULD be seated CLOSE to their parent/guardian. The reasons are many but if you imagine a ...


24

Any person above 2 years must have a seat, but where is that seat that's something left for common sense and not covered by any policy I am aware of. Seating policies usually go like "every effort must be made to ensure that families are seated next to each other" and that's it, and as we know, as long as that "effort" costs money, then airlines might ...


11

Happens often enough that there appear to be no rules at all about seating children other than not in the exit rows. The airline seat-reservation model certainly has no exceptions for age, but if you call the reservation line they will probably accommodate you next time. If not, maybe enough of: Can I really sit a 4 year old next to innocent strangers ...


2

In general, most restaurants in Paris will accept childs/babies with no particular issues, except maybe in the expensive ones. A good way to check the restaurant acceptance is to ask for a 'siège enfant' (child seat), many restaurants have one or two ready for customers. If you intend to keep your baby in it's trolley, just be careful not to disturb other ...


6

I have raised three children and know the problem intimately. This answer is about bringing the baby along (you asked: "is there another solution to this problem?") At the Northern end of Rue Mouffetard, you'll find a covey of small restaurants, all of which provide a venue for comfortable, family-friendly restaurants. There's about a dozen of these ...


4

It will depend on where in Spain, as that is regulated by local government (autonomías). You should ask the local municipality (ayuntamiento) for an authorization, and you will probably be required to pay some form of tax. I've been trying to find an authoritative source but, as Spanish government is so decentralised, regulation is so fragmented that I ...



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