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2

The 'Child Safety' page has some information on this. Mostly it says that child safety restraint systems (CRS) get approved for traffic and/or airline use by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but that FAA does not control all of the approvals. And stresses to check that the CRS has the label: This restraint is certified for use in motor ...


0

CARES Child Aviation Restraint System is designed specifically for aviation use for children age 1 and older who weigh between 22 and 44 pounds. These youngsters are old enough to be in their own seats, but are too small for the seat belt alone to protect them and provide the safety they require during airplane travel. Their bodies cannot ...


5

As was explained in the comments: The way that all the airline booking systems work, it is not possible to have people on different booking (fare) classes on the same ticket. If you have two people on the same flights in the same booking classes, it's fine. If you have two people on the same flights but different booking classes (could be business and ...


1

It is imperative that you BOOK EARLY TO GET FOUR SEATS TOGETHER. Put all other considerations aside. There're no "good" seats in that plane, no difference. As soon as you see this, SELECT YOUR SEATS so that you get four together. It is very likely that you will get caught out by this new crap where the airlines will magically require you to pay a few ...


4

After checking the seat layout provided in @pnuts's answer... Bad news No good seats to fit your exact needs, I was thinking of the bulkhead seats, but it seems in this particular airplane for this particular airline the bulkhead seats have "restricted leg room", which is not the case in many other airlines, as they add few extra inches to the leg room in ...


0

Take your pick. Other than avoiding those in yellow or red they all look "much of a muchness" (as is the nature of mass markets!) You might not be allowed or at least not welcome in the Emergency Exit rows for safety reasons, though they may provide a little extra room for fractious children - and if they are noisy at least complaints from those sitting ...


-1

Depending on things you can claim the citizenship of the airline, as there is some law (was told during my training but now long since forgotten) that until you exit the aircraft, you are under the protectorate of the country of the plane's registration. E.g., if the plane was USA registered, and you are born midair between Oz and NZ, then you are under the ...


0

In Canada they automatically become a Canadian Citizen :( It's named jus soli (Latin), or right of soil, as opposed to jus sanguinis, or right of blood. The citizenship policy is unique, among developed nations, to Canada and (at one point, not sure if it still is) the USA. It was put in place in the 1947 Citizenship Act when people would come and would ...


9

It varies according to country. And if the country does not have a rule, there is a United Nations directive that kicks in to prevent the baby from being stateless. In the United Kingdom, your question is explicitly addressed in the British Nationality Act 1981. For the purposes of this Act a person born outside the United Kingdom aboard a ship or ...


14

In vast majority of the cases, the child will have one or more of the parents' nationalities through jus sanguinis (this is true even if the child is born in some country). As far as I know, every country in the world (except the Vatican where nationality is ex officio) has some sort of jus sanguinis system, where children born abroad to parents of that ...


39

I have direct experience with this; not actually in flight thank goodness, but in transit. My daughter was born prematurely in Shanghai last year during a short layover between Paris and Auckland. My wife and I only had limited 48-hour transit visas for China and our flight was due to depart about 10 hours after she was admitted to hospital at the beginning ...


37

It's complicated, but as always, Wikipedia has it covered. The short version is that in the vast majority of cases, the baby will inherit one or more citizenships from its parents through jus sanguinis, and nothing more. If the baby is born within the territorial limits of a country that applies jus soli, including flying overheard and within nautical ...


4

Only countries that recognise jus soli ("right of the soil") consider babies born within their borders to be citizens of that country. Today, only countries in the Americas and a handful of others recognise jus soli. So, for the majority of the world it's not relevant where a baby is actually born. However, wherever a baby is born there is generally a ...


3

If one or both of the parents are from a country which operate a jus sanguinis system, the baby would be entitled to the citizenship of that country. The vast majority of countries have a jus sanguinis system, either by itself or in conjunction with a jus soli system (which entitles the baby to citizenship if s/he is born on that country's soil). If, ...


4

For small babies (up to 6-7 months): Any time of the day will work. Babies sleep a lot at this time, and if they will sleep on the plane, they will. Usually feeding/nursing a young baby to sleep on the plane is the best way to go. For older babies and young toddlers (7 months- 1.5 years): Redeyes usually work the best I found. At this age it is very hard ...


16

When we got the passport for our daughter (also German, then also <1 year old) we were told that we can have the photo in the existing passport updated for less than the price of a new passport. Children's passports can also be extended (being valid for another 6 years) and apparently this can be combined with the photo update, costing you 6 Euro and a ...


9

Yes, you have to change the passport. This tells * : Was viele nicht wissen – wenn Ihr Baby, Kleinkind oder Kind zum Zeitpunkt Ihrer Reise keine Ähnlichkeit mehr hat mit dem Lichtbild im Pass, dann kann es sein, dass der Pass nicht mehr akzeptiert und für ungültig erklärt wird. or, in English, What many do not know - if your baby, toddler, or ...


7

I can't speak for Germany specifically, as each country sets its own guidelines for this, but there is a general obligation to get a new passport if your appearance changes drastically. However, this is usually intended at adults only, and the US even exempts children officially as long as the change is due to the "normal aging process": You may have to ...


4

How long I need at the peace dome? It's just the ruin of a relatively small building to look at from the outside. The whole park, including the Sadako Sasaki memorial, takes an hour, tops. There's a museum that probably takes more time, but probably not a good place to take toddlers to. Is Miyajima a whole day trip With toddlers, it's at least a ...


2

N.B. I'm reporting information found on the web in French, which looks broadly consistent and up-to-date. I've never visited these caves. The Lascaux cave, or more precisely the partial replica Lascaux II that's open to the public, is open everyday during the summer period, and closed Mondays and for lunchtime outside the summer period. Check the web page ...


4

If you are thinking about Lascaux cave, you actually visit a replica of the cave, not the actual cave itself. But you really can't tell the difference. At the tourist office in Montignac you can buy tickets in advance, though it is limited to just a day or two ahead. So you could go buy the tickets, while your family does something else, then head to the ...



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