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13

There are three classically, iconically, Chicago dishes, and one newcomer that is heavily associated with the city for serious foodies. Beyond that, as Mark Mayo notes, Chicago is a large, diverse, cosmopolitan city with a very large population of migrants from around the world, so there are any number of best-in-class eateries for a wide variety of cuisines ...


12

TL;DR: While it probably would be possible for you to get downtown, see one or two things and get back, I would recommend settling in with a good book/iPad/kindle and get some movie watching/reading done. O'Hare is a terrible place to get in and out of. I imagine I'll leave the airport by 9, and should be back by 11:30. Is this reasonable? Assuming ...


10

Most US airports have no concept of "transit" and no "airside" where you can make your connection. You land, clear US customs, and then can go wherever you like, whether that's just over to another terminal to catch your plane, or out into the city to explore. So if you have the paperwork to enable the connection, then you almost certainly have the paperwork ...


10

Assuming you arrive in the domestic terminal and leave from the international one, I would first go over there and try to check in early, just to get that out of the way. It is always risky to leave the airport and get into suburban traffic when you have to catch another flight, especially an international one. Your time is limited and I wouldn't spend too ...


8

Basically there are two dishes that the city is famous for. the deep-dish pizza - made with a soft dough, cheese slices, chopped tomato sauce and a variety of ingredients on top. Hot dogs are made of beef, steamed or boiled meat and served with mustard, onion, sweet sauce and pickled cucumbers, sliced tomatoes and salt, ketchup is not added. However, ...


7

I use those Admirals' Clubs regularly. They are OK. The food and drinks options are poor, but the showers are pretty nice. There are also some comfortable chairs which recline, which might be good for sleeping, although they can go quickly. The quiet rooms generally are quiet, but they don't contain the reclining chairs (from memory). It costs $50 for a day ...


7

It's hard to find good info on spots in the airport, but Foursquare does mention: New privacy station with nice seats and power (free) near Johnny Rockets between T1 & T2 if you're looking for a place to nap and recharge (pun intended), this may be it. Apparently, several of the departure gates also include arm-less benches (airport sleepers' ...


7

I have had this problem in other US cities (and, to be fair, other countries/cities before). I think many taxi companies are not that interested in taking advance bookings - either they figure there's a good chance you won't turn up, or they just don't manage their taxis that way. In either case, in US cities, when booking something like this a day or two ...


6

You're right that next to the water it's worse. I live in northern Sweden next to a massive lake and it regularly gets -30C here at times in the winter. The humidity makes it worse - it's painful to breathe. However, Chicago is apparently more like -10C in the winter, which is really not so hard to deal with! Although I get that it's scary for a desert ...


6

I've not slept in this airport, so I can't give you personal information. Nevertheless there is a site called "Sleep in Airports" that gives general information about sleeping in almost any airport. About Chicago O'Hare, this page says that you can sleep in a lounge for US$40-50, there are 3 hotels and if you are looking for a free nap you have some reviews ...


5

I did it a month ago, but I had 9 hours between my flights. And I was lucky because I decided to return to the airport earlier than necessary: the CTA derailled and we had to take a bus to return to the O'Hare. You'll spend almost one hour to go downtown, and another hour to return, so you'll have some 3 free hours. I went to the the Chicago Beans (not the ...


5

Driver's licenses issued by one U.S. state or territory are valid in all of the other states and territories. In fact, it a constitutionally-based guarantee, deriving from Article 4, Section 1. Note however that if you have a valid driving permit in France, you will be able to use that to rent as well. You will be asked for your current address when ...


5

If your California license is in fact valid, you are all set. All US states recognize each other's licenses. The rental car company will want to see your California license but you shouldn't need any other documents; your citizenship and visa status should be irrelevant. You may want to call the California DMV and double-check that your license is still ...


4

Technically your license would have become invalid once you were no longer a permanent resident of the US. A "tourist" visa is NOT suitable for obtaining/holding a drivers license in California as only residents (temporary or permanent) are allowed to do so. California drivers licenses issued to non-permanent residents should have an expiry no later than ...


3

Essentially it's quite easy to find some suburbs considered 'Irish', from Wikitravel. From there: Far Southwest Side (Beverly, Mount Greenwood) Ireland in Chicago: authentic Irish pubs, brogues, galleries, and the odd haunted castle, all extremely far from the city center Further down, it speaks of Ethnic neighbourhoods: Chicago's Chinatown is ...


3

The City of Chicago as a web page on Transportation Between O'Hare and Midway. At that hour, a taxi or car service will be your most expeditious option. At $75 cab fare ($25 per person excluding the 3-year-old), it will be the most expensive, but there are taxi stands at each terminal, the ride is only 40 minutes in light traffic, and you won't have to ...


3

Chicago-style pizza is one of the specialities (and in my humble opinion is well worth trying). It's very deep, and almost more like a pie than a pizza. You will struggle to get exactly this kind of pizza outside Chicago, and certainly outside the USA (whatever frozen-pizza manufacturers might like to claim). Uno Chicago Grill (formerly Pizzeria Uno) is ...


3

If you can lug your baggage to the Clinton stop of the Blue Line, that will be the easiest option for you. You arrive straight in the airport and can take the elevator right up to the Sky Train, which will take you to Terminal 5. The current Megabus stop is about a block and a half south of Union Station, which makes it even closer to the Clinton Blue Line ...


2

Basically your best bet would be to use the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District's South Shore line to take a train to Chicago. Personally having driven on both I-94 and I-90 South East Chicago, Gary, and Hammond might not be the best places one might leave a car, so I would suggest going to South Bend as it might be a little out of the way, ...


2

My new favourite weather site, WeatherSpark, has as one of its features an Averages page, such as this one for Chicago. The averges page gives a distribution of values for various weather metrics, over a year. The one relevant to this question would I think be Dew Point: Dew point is often a better measure of how comfortable a person will find the ...


2

Getting through immigration usually takes at least half an hour and can often take an hour or more. Getting from O'Hare to downtown is another hour; getting back is yet another hour. You need to be back at O'Hare an hour and a half before your outgoing flight. That only leaves an hour to an hour and a half of your layover for actual sight-seeing.


2

Generally speaking Mass Transit in the US weekend schedules are lighter then the Weekday ones so you should keep that in mind. You can take a look at Google Transit as CTA's page suggests at how you can get from O'Hare to Midway, which is not 1:15 but closer to 2 hours and with a transfer from Blue to Orange Lines. It also suggest options using buses but ...


2

Try Kayak explore, one of my personal favorites for finding cheap airfare to wherever is cheap


2

I fly through O'Hare a lot, from a US domestic airport, to the UK. Typically you won't even see your checked luggage at Chicago, as long as you are travelling on the same airline/alliance (note: this is not true when flying in the other direction, i.e. when coming from a destination outside the US, as you need to go through customs, then "re-drop" your ...


2

I realized there is already an accepted answer but I figure I would add my 2 cents. Having lived in Chicago for 6 years and enjoyed the winters. For regular walking about when it is >0F, especially if you plan on going indoors at all, ex. shopping then I usually wear wool socks, non-insulated boots, jeans, t-shirt, heavy cloth button down shirt or sweater, a ...



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