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34

My personal experience has been that it's best to get a SIM card for each country I travel in. Local providers almost always have the best deals, and buying SIM cards is relatively inexpensive. Especially in Asian countries (where I have more travel experience) you can easily pick up SIM cards at shopping kiosks almost anywhere, and the rates are really ...


24

Not that phone. Virgin, in the USA, uses Sprint's network. Sprint uses the CDMA standard. Europe uses a different standard, GSM. The only US phones which can work in Europe are: GSM phones from AT&T and/or T-Mobile, the two GSM providers in the US, as long as the phone supports the same bands as the country you're going to (most phones in the last ...


21

I arrived at the kit below by adding gear only as needed. I started with just an iPhone and laptop and only added to that when it was literally impossible to get reliable internet at my accommodations with the gear I already had. I have trial-and-errored through a bunch of other gear that turned out to be unhelpful or not worth the bulk (e.g. higher ...


20

Things to consider: data roaming is very expensive you're charged for incoming calls in roaming you're charged local cost + roaming surcharge for outgoing If you have a sim-free second phone, your best option is to buy local sim. Pay-as-you-go (called pre-paid here) are very popular and inexpensive in Poland. You can get them as low as 5PLN ($1.60 ...


19

Yes, this will work, although you'll need an adapter plug to be able to plug your charger into a European socket. Actually, you don't really need your charger as any regular USB port will do. So if you have your laptop with you, you only need your laptop charger (for which you will also need an adapter plug). A universal travel adapter is something which ...


19

In Germany, you can use Aldi talk. If you buy a credit for 30 EUR the SIM-card will be active for 24 months. Another plus point is that you can use the SIM-card in the whole EU and it will not be very expensive - incoming calls are free, the outgoing call rate is the same as in Germany.


16

Right, with a bit of research, I've put the following together. Modern Japanese mobile phones (携帯電話 keitai denwa or just keitai) tend to operate on unique cellular standards not always compatible with the rest of the world. For instance, most Japanese 2G mobile phones operate on the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC) standard, which was developed and is used ...


15

I was a flight attendant before and I had this problem. I just kept losing them. Then I came up with an idea--An empty cigarette pack. Just put the sim cards inside the plastic that covers the pack and its tight enough to hold it. But then I saw a good thing that really helped me a lot. Its a sim card holder that can hold up to 4 sim cards, Its exactly the ...


14

It depends on what countries you are travelling to. If the country uses GSM, in most cases the best plan is to make sure you have an unlocked GSM phone, and purchase a pay-as-you-go SIM card in the country you are going to. If you Google for "International SIM" you will see that there are tons of websites selling pay-as-you-go SIMs, and in many countries, ...


14

AT&T has PayAsYouGo SIM cards, you can buy them in the real AT&T stores. You just come in and ask the clerk to sell you one. It costs $20 (as far as I remember). Then there's a $20/200MB (not sure about exact numbers) data plan for this card which is pretty expensive if you really plan to use the internet extensively. T-Mobile also has prepaid SIM ...


14

Well, turns out this is really easy - I just entered a store and asked for a monthly plan which includes unlimited data, and the clerk was happy to offer me a choice between a couple of available plans, without any requirement except a credit card (no need for zip code or credit check or American credit card / address). The store was T-Mobile, but I think ...


14

This wiki is a very good source of info: http://www.prepaid-wiki.de/ Many companies offer prepaid SIM cards. blau.de is a good option. I use a NettoKom SIM card, which is a re-branded blau card that is sold for 5€ in Netto grocery stores; other discount grocery stores (Lidl, ALDI, etc) have their own offerings. A one-month data plan will cost 10-15€. I ...


13

If she's there for a year, it might be worth getting a contract, as that may well be cheaper overall. As she already has the phone, she'd want a "SIM Only" deal, if she can get it. A carrier store on/near campus ought to be used to international students, so should be able to help if possible. (I've had a sales guy in a small AT&T shop look at me like I ...


13

For cellphone networks, there are two major standards: GSM and CDMA (Japan being one of the major exceptions if I remember correctly). CDMA only found wide acceptance in the US (licensing issues, primarily; major networks running on this being Verizon and Sprint. You should check with your operator (if it runs a CDMA network) but there's a good chance the ...


12

A possible option is a global sim card, like those from GoSim. They work in nearly every country. Another sneakier method, depending on what you need the data for and how fast it needs to be, is a 3G Kindle. It has free data to download books on Amazon's Whispernet in almost every country in the world, and has a basic experimental web browser on it. With ...


12

My name is Olivier, from FrenchConnection. The thing we usually do is deliver in advance in the hotel or camping where you will be staying overnight. As mentioned by someone earlier, we can still organize a collection in Paris gare du nord (it does not appear anymore on the website, but if you ask politely, we will of course do it). Also a very useful ...


12

@alx9r wrote a fantastically detailed post here, but I think it may be overkill. I'm on the road for most of the year and need to be connected 24/7 for work. For the most part you can get away with: An mini-router (I use an Airport Express). Flakey hotel wifi can be remedied by using a LAN cable to your mobile router, providing a personal wifi spot, ...


11

Apple sells a "World Travel Adapter Kit" http://store.apple.com/us/product/MB974ZM/B with a number of different charging options. It includes the USB-iPhone cable, an iPhone/iPad power adapter (semi-useless but I guess it's always good having a spare at home), and a number of swappable plugs for various countries. The advantage of this option is that ...


11

I'm just adding this in on the off chance that the US is the same as Australia, hopefully this is helpful. If you have a place in your city like a China Town that has plenty of Chinese shops you can get very cheap calls by purchasing Chinese calling cards. Many Chinese grocery stores have posters stuck up with call rates. This is very common in my local ...


10

My own best way to avoid data roaming fees when travelling is simply NOT to bring a cell phone abroad. Making a phone call is easy from anywhere without a cell phone and internet connections are provided in many places in cybercafés. Moreover, this is one object that you won't get stolen if it stays at home.


10

Google Voice -- $0.02/min. The way it works is you can call online or call a local US number that will call the Chinese number for you (which would use your minutes or your normal per minute cost on top of the $0.02). Your girlfriend could call you online using it as well, if you set up an account for her in the US (it can't be set up outside). That would ...


10

There are two types of mobile operators in the UK, network operators and virtual operators. Last time I landed at Heathrow terminal 1 there was a stand selling sim cards from one of the virtual operators between passport control and baggage claim though in central London you shouldn't have a problem finding a store of one of the network operators or the ...


10

Although this has been phrased as somewhat of a shopping-related question I'm going to answer the issue of short trips in multiple countries and having an easy way to stay connected to each other. I'm not going to cover calling abroad/home as you've already got that sorted, so I'll concentrate on calling locally (between the two of you and other locals) ...


10

Most airports in India have counters at arrivals, right after Customs, where you can pick up SIM cards very easily -- at least by Indian standards. In Delhi Airport T2, I used to be a regular at the Bharti Airtel booth, which would take your digital photo (or bring 2 passport photos to speed things up a bit), copy your passport, fill out the necessary forms ...


10

If you intend to stay in UK and Hungary more than a couple of days in each, you'd need to buy a package for each country separately. The global services rates you cite are actually pretty competitive, if I compare with what I'm charged for roaming in countries in Europe other than my own. I'd just try to reduce my voice usage as much as possible, and look at ...


10

Cell phones run on two different types of networks: GSM and CDMA. These network types themselves are subdivided into various bands (e.g. GSM 850 MHz). Most recent phones will support a wide range of bands within one network type. GSM is predominant in most countries except the US, which uses both. To verify that your current phone will work in another ...


9

I guess you might be in the UK based on the networks you listed? For within Europe, Vodafone are currently pretty good. Vodafone Passport means it's a single charge to answer/make a call, the rest is at the UK rate. If you're on a £40+/month plan, they'll give you 25mb/day/country of data for free, and 10 free texts a day When I go outside of Europe, I ...


9

While fairly slow to use, the Kindle 3G web browser works well enough for email and some browsing, and the 3G SIM is contract free and works throughout most of the World. Bar the cost of purchase it makes it free to use the internet for a lot of travelling.


9

In many of the big cities you will find department stores that are dedicated to selling electronics equipment. This is the place to buy your plan. The reason is that most of the booths are manned by young people and you are more likely to find someone who can speak English. You need to understand that although Chinese people are trying hard to learn English ...


9

Easy. If you're taking a laptop, Skype is the answer. Romania has the second fastest internet speeds in the world (I know, I was shocked when I read it two months ago, which is why it stuck in my head). Hostels have wifi as well, some hotels will too, so that's really probably your best option, if price is your primary factor to consider. Others may ...



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