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19

In most border towns you can, further away not. Sometimes they might also give you small change back in CAD, or charge you a small fee for using USD. If you exchange the money in a bank you will get a much better rate. Try to pay with your Credit card whenever possible.


19

I was in Montreal a few months ago, and I was worried about this. I tried my best to learn some French through podcasts (Coffee Break French - I really liked Coffee Break Spanish), but I still felt like I was floundering. Be aware though, that just 10 words can get you very far, if they're the right words. Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thank you, Yes, No, ...


17

Wikipedia seems to feel that even just stopping/not stopping at an official station is pretty rare and mentions only Canada as a place where you can stop "at any milemarker" on request. I can see this making sense North of Superior. Actually, I would love it when travelling between Oshawa and Montreal, since the train goes right past a place I would prefer ...


17

Your employer is full of it and sounds dodgy as hell. Canadians do not need a US visa to visit or study in the US, but they most certainly need one for any sort of work, including unpaid internships. Now of course you could lie and say you're visiting the US for some other reason, but like the embassy link above says: All Canadians are reminded that ...


16

No. I've lived in Montreal and Toronto and the occasional place will take US dollars, but most places will just laugh at you, perhaps in French. If they do take it, they might give you 80 cents on the dollar or so. Just use credit for everything. There's really no reason not to.


16

On flights into Canada they repeatedly announce that all passengers must claim their bags and clear customs at the first point of entry, regardless of their final destination within Canada or elsewhere. Repeatedly. Also customs in Montreal usually asks if you have checked bags. It is really unfortunate that you were given wrong information by Qatar Airlines. ...


15

There are literally hundreds of ski resorts in North America. Flying in to any of the major ones will be no problem at all. Some of them have their own airports, and almost all will run shuttles from the nearest major airport. If you are used to skiing the best of the Alps then you will need to go to one of the really top resorts to get the same experience ...


15

There's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily, and leaving permanently, which is as much as anything dictated by you returning to your place of residence. If you are in the US under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and you leave the US for a few weeks to visit Canada (or Mexico) with an intent to return to the US then you are deemed to ...


14

Unless the car is over 25 years old, it's very difficult to import a car into the US. Check out this article for some details: Importing Rare Cars into the US If it's newer, it has to meet Department of Transportation and EPA guidelines. California used to charge a $300 "smog" fee for a car brought in from another state, unless it had a special ...


14

Ottawa we can pretty safely drop from the list -- as a planned city populated mostly by government bureaucrats, it's got a few good museums but very little else to interest the casual visitor, and it's quite hard to get around without a car. Montreal vs Toronto is a more interesting showdown. Personally, I'd cast my vote for Montreal: it feels a bit ...


14

Then normally, for most people, you would require a visa. However, keep reading, there is good news, I'm just including all information for future people reading this. VisaHQ - for Indian passport, living in the US, you still need a visa, whether for business, tourist or transit purposes. Citizenship and Immigration Canada also confirms - visitors to ...


14

In Qu├ębec, a flashing green traffic light means that no cross-traffic can go, even the traffic on the same road coming from the other direction has a red light. This means that (if allowed) you can make a left turn without having to yield (except possibly to pedestrians in the cross street). See e.g. this or this advice on the peculiarities of driving in ...


13

Well I wish you had used a photo of a cleaner European toilet for comparison. What will the Canadians think?! Indeed this is typical of North American toilets. The same applies down in Good Ole USA too. In fact I've seen much higher water levels than this. There are two answers really: Man up and take it! In some places in Europe they have a much crazier ...


13

If you are a US citizen, you can indeed cross into Canada using your birth certificate and a photo ID. For safety reasons, you may want to bring the original birth certificate, or at least a certified copy. If you are not a US (or Canadian) citizen or permanent resident, you cannot enter Canada without passport: If you are a citizen of the United States, ...


12

Usually, yes. But now that the US dollar isn't more valuable (and is fluctuating wildly from week to week) I've noticed more places not taking it or taking it at a steep discount. You won't get the value you used to out of it. It's always a good idea to have some local currency on hand no matter where you're going. A credit card will also work, though there ...


12

Mostly Canada, but also a little bit in the Caribbean, and Shannon and Dublin in Ireland. The complete list: CBP Preclearance Locations It doesn't necessarily save time, but it does allow you to fly directly to smaller US airports that aren't international airports and which don't have customs facilities.


12

It's not a neighbourhood per-se, but I think you'd find the Olympic Park interesting. You've got the main stadium itself, which is impressive and you can go up the tower to an observatory to see the surrounding area. That in itself could be enough to tick your urban design box! Also in the park you have the Montreal Biodome, in the old cycling facility. ...


12

Whenever I used to visit Montreal I'd try to hit as many of the following as possible: The Old Port of Montreal St. Catherines street Bell Centre/new forum. Plus the old forum, it's a lot of hockey history, and my favourite restaurant is right next door (indeed the only St. Hubert's I'll go to) Olympic Stadium, although it was more when they had a baseball ...


12

You should be fine. According to the Canadian Border Services Agency website: If you are importing or exporting monetary instruments equal to or greater than CAN$10,000 (or the equivalent in a foreign currency), you must report the amount to the CBSA when you arrive or before you leave Canada. This applies to either cash or other monetary ...


12

The short answer is that by regulation, the three-character IATA code for an airport in Canada generally corresponds to a three-character Transport Canada code (TCLID), which in turn generally corresponds to the last three letters of its four-character ICAO airport code. So why do the ICAO codes for Canadian airports all start with CY or CZ? That is murkier. ...


12

In Ontario, pretty much all of the flashing greens have been replaced with green arrows. When we had flashing greens, they were inevitably accompanied by a sign "advanced green when flashing". This referred to the fact that you were getting the green in advance of the traffic moving towards you, and so could freely turn left (or go straight.) Some ...


12

but [tipping] is meant to be for a good job Yes, in theory, but in practice it's standard to (almost) always leave a tip. Even if the service is merely "bad", then you generally leave a tip on the low end of the scale. If it really is appalling (ie, they got your order completely wrong, or were excessively slow for no good reason), then you leave a ...


12

The Rainbow Bridge is a land border crossing between Canada and the US. There are no facilities to cross it without departing one country and entering the other, so as a result you will need whatever legal status is required to enter the other country - which obviously depends on your citizenship. If you are a Canadian or US citizen then you do not ...


11

Lunenburg is a UNESCO world heritage site. Tourists go there from all over. You could also walk the Cabot Trail (not that Cape Breton is super close to Halifax, but if you're outdoorsy you'll love it) or go see the tides in the Bay of Fundy. The provincial tourism board is not a bad place to start for details and more ideas.


11

It depends what you define as Northern Ontario and how much you want to see. Some places (Moosonee and Moose Factory for example) are train only. Many are bus only. You can fly to Sudbury on a regularly scheduled commercial flight. Heck, some people might consider Peterborough or Barrie to be northern, and you can take Go Transit (commuter trains and buses) ...


11

The Pacific route is a beautiful route! Expensive, but beautiful none the less. From the West Coast of the U.S., you can take Amtrak's Cascades train (tel. 800/USA RAIL; www.amtrak.com) to Bellingham, Washington; the dock for the Alaska ferry is quite close to the railroad station. From the east, it makes more sense to use Canada's ...


11

No, you can't. They're different types of adapters. What I do when I need confirmation is to check this website: http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity.htm It has an EXHAUSTIVE list of each and every type, the voltage and the countries that use them. It's been handy for some of the stranger countries I've been to and hasn't failed yet. Myself, I have ...


11

To expand the other answer and my comment ... Why do you want to do this? Your profile says you plan to live in Sweden for a bit then Canada. I'm assuming you want to take the Taser to Canada, and there it might be legal, the prohibited weapons lists says only: 30 Device with incapacitating electric charge shorter than 480 mm This category ...


10

Yes, you do need one. The US doesn't share the concept of "in international transit" that a lot of other countries have. When you step off a plane on US soil[*], you must clear US customs and immigration. Only then can you proceed to board your next flight. The DHS have an entry about this in their FAQ: Do nationals or citizens of countries that ...


10

There are a large number of ski resorts in the states, with varying degrees of notoriety, and almost all of the big ones are fairly easy to reach. Depending on where you're starting from, you may need to change planes once, but from most major European airports it shouldn't need twice. There are even charter flights to some of them! Nip into your nearest ...



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