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28

In Finland/Sweden/Norway/Iceland you are allowed to do this by law as long as you stay away from houses and use common sense like you say. It is literally translated as 'every mans rights' (See also this question on Travel-SE for more information). In the summer these countries are perfect for this kind of holiday and I can recommend it to you very much. In ...


27

France Wild camping is allowed except in specific protected places, depicted here: Anyway there are many local rules, so the best is to find the city hall of the village where you want to camp and ask there. An alternative to city hall is church, where the priest might be able to tell you whether the local church owns some field in the country side. If ...


19

Allemansrätten, or Every person's right, is a freedom in Sweden which states that everyone must have access to nature. As far as I remember, there are similar rules in other Nordic countries, but I'm not familiar with the specifics. Naturvårdsverket is the Swedish environmental protection agency that regulates the access to nature. You can read the rules at ...


18

Check out Freagle. Freagle is like couchsurfing, instead of your couch you can offer your backyard, barn... It's not wild camping per se but it is trying to fill the gap between the illegal wild camping and the normal camp site. And indeed, not so many hosts available. Still worth a try. My own experience with wild camping in Germany is positive if you ...


15

I've investigated related topic for the bicycle trip over Italy, and I can say this: There are many camping zones where you can easily stay for the night and even get a tent for rent. You can easily find such camping by internet, and choose ones matching your criteria. About tolerance - remember one thing: If there any fence, rope, metal wire or something ...


14

In Scotland, UK you are legally allowed to camp on privately owned fields that don't have crops. Scotland does not have a law of trespass - although camp on military land at your peril. The rest of the UK (England, Wales and Northern Ireland) do not have this freedom, you legally have to go to campsites. In Ireland you do not have the legal right to roam ...


14

The "Visit Iceland" website has a page about your rights to camp in Iceland. Camping with no more than three tents is allowed on uncultivated ground for a single night, unless the landowner has posted a notice to the contrary. However, campers should always use designated campsites where they do exist. Do not camp close to farms without permission. If a ...


12

Here's a similar summary for Finland, with a PDF brochure giving more details. It's pretty similar to the Swedish rules, with a few minor differences: Certain types of fishing (angling without reel, ice fishing) are allowed without permit. Open fires are not allowed without the landowner's permission, except in emergencies.


12

You might get forcibly evicted by the police. This could include any of these further downsides: You might be the target of tear gas. You might be the target of water canon. Your tent and gear could get damaged. If one side is perceived as becoming violent, the other side may also become violent. You could feel the sting of a police baton. If you are ...


12

I would not recommend a tent if you want to see the cities and rely on public transport: campsites are generally outside the city, near woods, lakes or the sea, since they are intended for recreation; unlike in the states or Australia where some people live there permanently and this also means there wont be much public transport near campsites Leave ...


12

There's good news and bad news. The good news - you CAN camp anywhere, except the church land, private gardens and near water reservoirs. We researched this in 2008 and found many, many resources online saying it's perfectly fine to camp even on the side of the road. We even checked this with locals in Novosibirsk when we got there. However, they ...


10

All the quotes are from my LonelyPlanet: Bulgaria: Camping in the wild (ie outside a camping ground) is technically prohibited but normally accepted if you’re discreet and, most impor tantly, do not build wood fires (which attract attention and damage the environment). Greece: Free (wild) camping is illegal, but the law is not always ...


10

If you are going to "occupy" Auckland, you are de facto part of their cause. You're in for the demonstrations, the speeches, music, and any other activities that comprise the event. And you're subject to any backlash that group encounters: civil disobedience, counter demonstrations, police, legal action, etc. The upside is that, if it's a lawful assembly, ...


10

In general wild camping is illegal in Germany. However I could find where you can do it, but not for free. Trekiking-pfalz.de offers 10 camping places for up to 6 tents, the price for one tent is 10 EUR / night. You're allowed to stay on one place only for a night and then you have to move along. On their website there are some recommended routes, and there ...


10

Japan does not have a general "right to access" like Scandinavian countries, wild camping on public land is theoretically illegal and wild camping on private property requires the landowner's permission. That said, both rules are only loosely enforced and there's a bit of a tradition of "urban camping" (野宿 nojuku) in Japan: simply put, if you pitch up a ...


9

It turned out there was a campground just a couple of minutes walk from the KTEL bus station where I posted my question from! It didn't show up when I used Google Web or Maps for "camping" or "campground". I fluked finding it by Googling for "Lonely Planet Ioannina" where they listed its name and no other details. Then Googling for its name led to some ...


9

Whether the budget is sufficient depends on several things: Which countries you are going to, the ones you are mentioning are all on the expensive side How you travel, getting a rail pass helps but hitch-hiking or ride sharing is cheaper How much you spend on drinks and going out. Whether you eat in restaurants, fast food joints or cook in hostel kitchens. ...


9

According to this page wild camping is illegal in Germany, but what is allowed is "overnight parking". The distinction is that overnight parking just means you are parking in a regular parking lot and not setting up a table outside your vehicle or anything similar.


9

It is possible, but not legal. Other questions have already addressed the illegality of wild camping in Germany, and offer some alternatives if you don't want to violate the law. However, if you're in a remote place, high up in the mountains, or otherwise in a place where people do not pass by, and you are very well-behaved, the chances of being caught may ...


8

East Coast Park is a nice place for camping especially in Singapore. The first thing is that you'll need to get a camping permit, which you can book online or at AXS self-service machines. You will only be able to do this if you have permanent residence or a long-term visa for Singapore as the permit requires you to enter an IC number or FIN (and AFAIK, AXS ...


8

My company Russian Connections specializes in travel to Russia for people from the United States. I looked over all of the responses and have some extra information for you. Rules with Russian change all the time. REGISTRATION: Currently you only need to register yourself only if you plan to stay more than 7 working days in Russia. I agree with the other ...


8

WorldWide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) is the only way I know of to stay for free somewhere other than couch surfing. This might be what the Romanian you met used. I'm not familiar with Korea's program specifically, and all WWOOF farms vary depending on the host, but they may be able to help you arrange free accommodations and meals in exchange for ...


8

AFAIK almost every forest/unoccupied land in Germany is private property and therefore legally off-limits. But I have often camped wild as resident with tent in Germany and never ever experienced problems. Conditions: You are camping in a forest which is really big enough. Noone likes uninvited campers in direct vicinity. An option is to ask a farmer if ...


7

This is the site your looking for. It is the official Munich website and it lists some places where you can park your camper. A lot of them are camping grounds, but there are also some areas where you don't have to camp but where you just can leave your camper. At the bottom of the page there are also some special places listed, that are only available ...


7

The ADAC (Allgemeiner Deutscher Automobil Club), the german automobile club, features a series of guides, that covers thousands of campgrounds in whole Europe. Each campground is shortly described, rated, and the facilities as well as the prices are listed. Here is an example of the actual guide that covers Germany and Scandinavia. I used these books a lot ...


7

The tourist information offices in Ireland (here's a list from the Irish Tourist Organisation, 'Discover Ireland') sell booklets with maps of campsites. I got one in the Dublin office for €5. It lists loads of campsites, has some photographs of them, lists details (opening days, phone numbers, directions, facilities, etc.). They also sell booklets of ...


7

Wow, cheapest place you saw was 50 €. I was in Ioannina in August, and just by walking from the bus station towards the centre I stumbled into a nice little hotel and inquired about prices. It was 25€ for a single room, and I took that. The room was comfy, air-conditioned, etc. No breakfast though. The place was called Hotel Elpis. Address: ...


7

National Forests generally allow "dispersed camping" without any fee. Exact rules may vary from place to place, but typically you may camp anywhere you want on Forest Service land, as long as it is at least 100 feet (or some such distance) from a road, trail, or water source. You can normally park your car anywhere along a Forest Service road as long as ...


7

Wild camping is permissible as long as you maintain a respectful distance from homes etc, but in some places it might difficult to find good spots to put up a tent close to the road. Based on my experience, the best spots are found taking side roads a little bit off the main ring road. Near populated areas you can usually find official camping sites (check ...


7

From FaroeIslands.com: Camping There are no public wilder­ness or common areas in the Faroes. As a consequence, camping is only permitted at designated camp­sites (See page 88). Moreover, it is not permitted to stay overnight in your camp­ing cars along the road, at rest stops, lay-bys or view areas. Be aware that many camping sites are ...



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