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11

Two weeks is a decent amount of time to explore Cambodia. Here are a couple of my recommendations: Siem Reap: The Angkor Wat and surrounding temples can either be covered in a day, or over a couple of days. This is important because you need to buy a pass, and there are passes of different durations: 1-day ($20), 3-day ($40) etc. There's a 7-day pass too ...


10

Getting to Aranya Pratet via train or bus from Bangkok There are 2 trains that leave from Bangkok daily for this town; The first train is at 5:55am from Hualamphong and the second is at 13:05pm. The tickets cost 48 baht and are available only on the day of travel. The trains do tend to get delayed along the way, so unless you have plans to break up your ...


8

Recently while planning my trip to Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, I did a little research: I am not sure about direct buses from Siem Reap. However, Stueng Traeng is about 5 hours. From there, you can get a mini bus connection to Pakse. This takes about another 5 hours. From Pakse it is an overnight sleeper to Vientiane. If you have time, it is advisable to ...


8

For Laos, Canadian citizens require a Single Entry visa, valid for up to 60 days. Cambodia you require a single entry visa, valid for 90 days. However, in both cases, while they're valid for 60 and 90 days respectively, this is just the period after application during which you enter, and you can only actually stay in each country for 30 days, or when ...


8

Well according to Wikitravel: The nearest Cambodian town is Stung Treng, and the border is a 90-minute speedboat or bus ride away. Note that the border is lightly used, with almost no onward public transport available at the border (therefore book through transport from Stung Treng to Ban Nakasang for Si Phan Don/Don Det) and both customs officers and ...


8

Here's a recent article from the Phnom Penh Post: Dealing in turtles is mostly illegal in Cambodia, where six of the 14 turtle species are endangered, some critically. The only legitimate options are to import them or buy from the single licensed farm. But a thriving trade that stretches from small provincial restaurants in Cambodia to Hong Kong ...


8

I hacked up a basic version of such an app as a single-page of HTML with Javascript. Then MeNoTalk came along and made it pretty! When you edit any of the fields in the "price" or "paid" sections, all the other fields update. Not as you type but when you hit enter after editing. The bottom section tells you how much change you should get. It's doesn't ...


7

I think to get from Saigon to Kampot, you have to go through Phnom Penh. The main roads and bus lines go that way. Even if there are more direct roads, I doubt they can be used by buses because of the condition of many bridges in the area. Usually you can always get a private taxi to take you anywhere, but I doubt you'll find someone in Saigon driving you ...


7

The Minibus from the Oasisbar in Ha Tien to Kampot via Kep leaves at noon as I mention in this answer. Though the motobike taxis leave whenever you want. And yes it is not as safe as in a car. Though the driver can take your backpack between his legs in front of him like shown in the picture. So you either take a little risk or get the minivan at noon. ...


6

Will you need visas? Yes Based on hippietrail's great comment, here's the breakdown: Canadian: Fiji: No visa Indonesia: Visa on Arrival (VOA) Thailand: No visa (expect to get entry stamps in your passports) Cambodia: VOA Laos: VOA Vietnam: Visa required before entry (or pre-approval, read below) Swede (same requirements as Canada for these countries): ...


6

Mark's answer covers most parts so I'll throw in a couple of notes from my experience: The on-arrival visa is a single-entry visa; the same visa won't allow you to get back from Laos. You could get an ordinary visa or a business visa (the type 'E' that Mark refers to) but by default these are single entry, and you need to get an extension to get multiple ...


6

Another option would be to go through Thailand, take a bus from Pakse to Ubon Ratchathani (3 hours leaving 7:30 am). From there take a bus to Surin running on highway 24, there may be a train (3 hours) as well. From Surin you can take a swangthaew or minibus to the Cambodian border at Chong Jom (2-3 hours). 16 km south of the border is Along Veng but ...


6

I walked from the hostel zone near the Independence Monument to the immigration office, opposite the airport (a long way, not recommended for people less crazy than me). Apparently a tuk-tuk would be about $9/$10 but we discovered there is a comfortable air-conditioned city bus to the airport for KHR 1,500 (37 and a half cents!) which runs along ...


5

The ferries between Koh Kong and Sihanoukville ended a few years ago, and the service seems unlikely to return. Between the paving of the southern road, the rise in fuel prices, and the fall in foreign tourism it is no longer economically feasible, and despite the election of the Shinawatra government, tensions between the two countries are high due to ...


5

I can't vouch for micro SIMs, but this wiki (very handy) will give you the lowdown on getting prepaid SIMs most everywhere you need to go. Shops or airport kiosks will probably know more about getting a micro SIM. If all else fails, though, you can use a SIM cutter.


5

You can get a tourist visa on-arrival in Cambodia at all airports and most main land border points with Thailand, so you don't need to obtain one in advance. If you still want to get one in advance, the easiest way is to apply online for an 'e-visa', the details for which are listed on the Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website. Getting a visa in ...


5

From everything online (blogs, wikitravel, and websites) the ferry as you know is best in the wet season, when the river is high (June to November, usually) However, as the dry season approaches or ends, it's debateable. If the rain comes early, you could be ok. However April is quite well into the dry season, but still over a month before the rains - ...


5

According to this thread on a dedicated forum there's a bike shop called Flying Bikes in Phnom Penh that should sell Hydrapacks's. Flying Bikes sell Hydrapaks - as good as a camelbak. A quick search on Google maps reveals that there are two homonymous shops with incremental names. I'm not sure if they are part of the same franchise though. Here is ...


4

From wikitravel regarding Saigon - Ha Tien: There are buses to Ha Tien from Ho Chi Minh City's Mien Tay terminal (about 8h). To get to Mien Tay Bus Station (Western bus station): Take bus No. 139 from Tran Hung Dao Street. I found this on Tripadvisor, a nightbus to Ha Tien the bus leaves from the Western Bus Station in Saigon,at 21.00 and gets ...


4

There are boats between Battambang and Siem Reap, they leave in the morning (around 7am) and take most of the day. You spend several hours on a small river where you can see tons of animals and birds, later you cross Tonle Sap Lake, the last part to Siem Riep is by jeep. It takes a while but its a great ride. The fruit shakes in Battambang are ...


4

As far as I can tell, the official answer seems to be nothing. As a Philippines passport holder, you don't need a visa for either country for stays of less than 21 days. But since the ASEAN visa-free zone isn't quite as smooth in practice as it is in theory, do bring along any written documentation about why you are going to Vietnam, who you are meeting, ...


4

As mentioned in the comments you have very few options flying into Cambodia. You can check Cambodia Airport site to see exactly who flies in and out of the 3 major airports in the country. The closest major airport to Phnom Penh that one might fly into actually appears to be Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam, though to fly there you will still have to make a ...


4

There is no convenient midpoint stop, I think it's better to just bear the long road journey (I hear it's better in 2012 than few years ago). Chachoengsao has a huge buddhist temple (allegedly the largest in the world), an old market and a decent river tour. Worth a visit, technically on the way, but rather close to Bangkok (1-2h). Poipet is a seedy ...


4

Apparently Google can convert multiple currencies to one. In the example showed it sums 1 British Pound, 2 US Dolars, 10 Swiss Francs and 1000 Indian Rupees and converts it to Euros. But when I try to sum any currency with Cambodian Riels it doesn't seem to work. Perhaps it's a bug or I don't know how to make Google understand what I wish.


4

It looks like that page I quoted on www.cambodiahome.com is at least out of date, and probably just outright wrong. I asked the person at the desk at my guesthouse and it seems jpatokal and Tom are right that it can't be done directly in Siem Reap. The guesthouse quoted me a price above $60 taking four days by sending it off to Phnom Penh. I think I'll ...


4

I managed to find a couple of shops which had "hydration bladders" as well as "hydration packs", all of them were westernised bicycle shops with a wide range of accessories. Flying Bikes 2 had a good quality 1 liter bladder for 23 USD and a lower quality 2 liter for 18 USD. On street 182 between Bd. Charles De Gaulle and Monivong Bd. there was a ...


3

I can't say about the smaller places, but in the big cities like Hanoi, Phnom Penh and Ho Chi Minh it's fairly easy to get the sim cards. (both normal and micro sim's) it appears that the 3G network is also quite good, and not expensive. (check viettel.com for some information)


3

I liked the 4000 Islands (Si Phan Don) in the very South of Laos and did the relaxing and reading as Ankur is mentioning - not much more to do there. When I was in Pakse I rented a motobike and drove to the Bolaven Plateau for Coffee, local market and the Waterfall Tat Fan which is a 120m high twin-waterfall.


3

I didn't get to travel to Laos because of travel (transportation onward from Stung Treng sounded iffy from reports I heard due to local flooding at the time) and unclear visa situation for Indian passport holders for visa-on-arrival at the border. Still, I gathered something from travellers who went there and back to Cambodia. Laos is a tougher country to ...


3

No, you cannot do this any more. The reason is that the Angkor Wat archaeological park is a protected complex, and drivers need to be registered with the authorities who maintain the park to be allowed into it. My tuk-tuk driver told me they need to be registered too, and of course, any tourists need to buy a valid pass. I am guessing that people who live ...



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