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134

TL;DR: If you know you're going, and there's a fare you can afford, book it. Waiting will almost never save you money, and never enough to offset paying double or triple the cheapo fare because you waited too long. Detailed explanation, with pictures: The problem is that there is no single "the price" that goes up and down. On any given flight you can buy ...


47

It's hard to understand why this can be the case without some background in how airline fares work, so lets start with a bit of background... For each route, airlines will publish a number of different fares, each with a distinct "fare code" - normally with weird names like "TANRKL", "YSJWNN" or "X34Q". Corresponding to these fare codes are "fare rules" ...


43

I recently travelled for 6 months through Asia. During this time I met many travellers who were travelling for much longer periods, some for several years. Most people like myself had simply worked and saved hard for a year or more then travelled through counties where it is cheap. I also met a couple of people who were working on their travels, a writer ...


34

My personal experience has been that it's best to get a SIM card for each country I travel in. Local providers almost always have the best deals, and buying SIM cards is relatively inexpensive. Especially in Asian countries (where I have more travel experience) you can easily pick up SIM cards at shopping kiosks almost anywhere, and the rates are really ...


34

Let's take this one step at a time. First you must own jeans. Here's your problem - you'll want them to be worth a bit. You can buy jeans for anything from $5 to a few hundred dollars if you really want to in western clothing stores. Let's say an expensive pair - US$200, and I assure you I've never spent that much on a pair of jeans. Now let's assume you ...


30

I have done a 25 months trip (Around the world but mostly in South East Asia) and a 22 months one (Latin America). I spent about 22,000 Euros each which I saved before or between the trips. Important points: I did not have any regular expenses back home, no health insurance, mortgage, storage fees, family. But I also did not have any income either. I do ...


26

If you pay by Dollar (or home currency) The hotel will add a charge for this, hence you will be paying more. If you pay by local currency the exchange rate will be decided by the credit card company or bank. These exchange rates are much better than the hotel rates. Check this Visa page for more information regarding this service for Visa holders. AFAIK, ...


25

That used to be true, back in the 1980s, in the Soviet Bloc countries, because: blue jeans were the fashion trend then and there they were not available on the market, at all (not "sold out", not "in small quantities", not at all.) thus providing an opportunity for home-made imitations and for scarce (rare even) black-market goods Now, that's a textbook ...


23

You can do that. since one-way tickets are always more expensive. Booking a flexible return ticket will also be more expensive than the single ticket version, but you should look into it, since it should be cheaper than the double-return tickets in most cases. But you better make sure that you know where and how to buy a ticket in Hong Kong and how much it ...


23

The cheapest, but especially most efficient way of transport to get around Paris is the Velib. You pay a fee of 1,70 EUR for a dayticket or 8 Eur for a week ticket. During the validity of this ticket you can use any bicycle from the velib network. Source: Wikimedia Commons The catch to really travel cheap is to change bikes every 30 minutes. If you cycle ...


21

Lauren (co-founder of Flightfox) here. I can't tell you exactly what's going on in this contest but I can give you a general answer. Our experts come from many walks of life. Some are travel agents who really know their way around fare rules and ticketing. Some are frequent flyers who have learned from experience. And others are just pure travel hackers who ...


20

It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. Where prices differ is generally when it comes to alcohol (much more expensive), junk ...


20

The metro is only €1,70 per ride, and if you buy a carnet of 10 the price is €13.30 for all 10. Probably your best bet. I hate cycling because of the issues with locking it up, worrying about theft, and if you're in the upper arrondissements going uphill on cobblestone sounds like a miserable experience I would rather spare myself from. The city is ...


20

ConsumerReports.org has done the analysis. Obviously it'll be different for every car and shape and size of roof rack, and contents of the rack, but in their experiment: 2013 Honda Accord (4-cyl.) MPG (Miles Per Gallon) @ 65 mph = 105 km/h ---------------------------------------------- No rack 42 mpg = 5.6 l/100km ...


19

If you have a Nokia Symbian device, then you can get Ovi Maps installed on it. Ovi Maps allows you to download map files for as many countries as you want and store in on your memory card. Once that's done, you can set Ovi Maps to offline mode and still be able to use it to get directions. If you get a local SIM, then it will be able to show you rough ...


19

victoriah wrote in her answer: It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. I'm from Finland—another Nordic country generally ...


19

Well they travel as cheaply as possible. There are lots of tricks and lots of levels. No matter how cheaply you do it you always meet people in comparison to whom your expenses seem ridiculously extravagant! The main three factors in a trip are 1) accommodation 2) transport 3) food You can save on all these at multiple levels depending on your sense of ...


19

Not sure if this is quite the scenario you are outlining, but: If you're really really broke, chances are you won't be eating at restaurants or places that require tipping in the first place :) At least in the US, tipping is not the norm (or is completely optional - eg. tip jar might be present) at fast food (McD, Chipotle), sandwich shops (Subway) or other ...


18

Honestly, I would stick with couchsurfing. I hate to sound like the news and say craig's list can be dangerous, but I know some people that have had bad experiences... really bad experiences. I would say stick with a site that validates users. If you don't mind working, you can always go with somethign like WWOOF. Also, working in a hostel is usually a ...


18

Yes, there is! On the first Sunday of every month, almost all the main museums and art galleries are open for free. The only slight downside is that loads of people take advantage of this, so the queues can be quite long (it took 25 minutes to get into le Musée d'Orsay today mid afternoon as a guide), and they can be very busy inside. See this question on ...


17

Municpal bus 96T is probably the cheapest, at 3.00 lira (~$2 USD), but it takes very long (~1.5h at times) and is often packed. Havas bus is faster and costs 10 lira (~$6.50 USD). If you plan to use public transport a lot, buy the Akbil pass (saves a bit of money and you don't need to dig for coins all the time). The trip is also possible via metro, but ...


17

As was said before, the main sources of costs are accommodation, transport and food. What I want to add for accommodation: There are several hospitality services. Essentially, these are social networks using which people offer places to stay, all around the globe. The most popular I'm aware of are Couchsurfing, Hospitality Club and be welcome. Didn't ...


17

Ryanair allegedly shows different prices to based on your previous visit / search history to give you the illusion that cheap tickets are running out. Clearing your cookies or visiting the site in incognito / private mode can show you the truly cheapest price they have. Flying out in the middle of the week is a good strategy for almost any kind of air ...


17

Yes, you can: Accommodation: Hostels are very cheap, here says that you can stay one night from 10 euros. Anyway, in my experience, if you talk with the owner you can get a discount for a long period stay. So, say you will expend 300 euros on this. Transport: Forget to take public transport. Use your legs. Try to find a hostel near the places you will ...


17

A summary of fuel dumping and the ethics of it are on My philosophy on Fuel Dumping on hackmytrip.com: Fuel dumping is a method by which a fuel surcharge on an international fare is removed through the addition of one or more additional unrelated segments. Because of IATA (International Air Transport Association) rules that few people understand ...


17

I spent quite a lot of time investigating this last year. Last time I checked (around February 2012) the only realistic possibility of a traditional courier flight without knowing anyone on the inside or with an airline is with British Airways, who offer a courier spot on flights between London Heathrow and Tokyo Narita. I called up their reservations ...


16

I think the trip is doable reasonable well, although double or triple the time wouldn't be a bad thing. You just have to concentrate on the main sights. For example in Paris, you could easily spend one or two days in the Louvre, but if you're happy with seeing it only from outside, or just take a glimpse at Mona Lisa, 1 hours is enough. I traveled really a ...


16

A number of people will tell you different things, but I'll say Tuesday or Wednesday. Now, there are two parts to this question. Firstly, what day is the cheapest to fly, and then what day is the cheapest to buy. To fly, is generally during the week days, not Monday or Friday as people are coming back / going on trips - leisure or business. ...


15

The most simple answer to this is "because they can"! In most markets International airfares are priced on a directional basis, so AAA-BBB-AAA will be priced completely differently to BBB-AAA-BBB, and it's extremely common for the prices to vary wildly between the two origins. Sometimes the price different at a point in time is simply due to a "sale" going ...



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