Hot answers tagged

160

TL;DR: If you know you're going, and there's a fare you can afford, book it. Waiting will almost never save you money, and never enough to offset paying double or triple the cheapo fare because you waited too long. Detailed explanation, with pictures: The problem is that there is no single "the price" that goes up and down. On any given flight you can buy ...


74

Short answer: No, you will not get such a discount. Longer answer: For any significantly-sized airliner, the commodity they have to sell you is floor space in the cabin, not weight. If you're occupying one seat of the same size, you're costing the airline almost exactly the same as someone who weighs twice what you do. Let's consider some numbers: ...


63

It's hard to understand why this can be the case without some background in how airline fares work, so lets start with a bit of background... For each route, airlines will publish a number of different fares, each with a distinct "fare code" - normally with weird names like "TANRKL", "YSJWNN" or "X34Q". Corresponding to these fare codes are "fare rules" ...


56

I suspect your Mom hasn't spent much time in the places you're planning to visit, because the notion that these countries are dangerous is frankly ridiculous. I've spent most of my life living in Europe, including Ireland, UK, France and Germany and have never been the victim of any personal crime. Maybe I've just been lucky, but if you want something a bit ...


51

I recently travelled for 6 months through Asia. During this time I met many travellers who were travelling for much longer periods, some for several years. Most people like myself had simply worked and saved hard for a year or more then travelled through counties where it is cheap. I also met a couple of people who were working on their travels, a writer ...


51

Some Stats I ran some stats for you (from our data on Hostelz.com, a travel website that I represent) and currently 97% of hostels provide free bedsheets, and the remaining 3% charge a fee. Towels are a different matter. Currently 50.5% of hostels include free towels, 46.9% charge a fee, and 2.6% don't offer towels at all. The History Over the long ...


40

I'm not sure where you are coming from, USA? Cities in Europe are like cities in the US, there are business areas, residential areas, entertainment districts with restaurants & theatres. In general you will be safe in Europe but you should probably get a guide book for each country you plan to visit, guides such as Lonely Planet warn of the rough areas ...


39

My personal experience has been that it's best to get a SIM card for each country I travel in. Local providers almost always have the best deals, and buying SIM cards is relatively inexpensive. Especially in Asian countries (where I have more travel experience) you can easily pick up SIM cards at shopping kiosks almost anywhere, and the rates are really ...


38

I have done a 25 months trip (Around the world but mostly in South East Asia) and a 22 months one (Latin America). I spent about 22,000 Euros each which I saved before or between the trips. Important points: I did not have any regular expenses back home, no health insurance, mortgage, storage fees, family. But I also did not have any income either. I do ...


36

Lots of reasons! Most of which boil down to prioritizing time and convenience over cost. You need to fly to a city with no direct service. Most LCCs only sell "point to point" and will not cover missed connections, while full-service carriers do. You have an unpredictable schedule and need the ability to change your flights easily. LCCs tend to fly less ...


35

In Finland/Sweden/Norway/Iceland you are allowed to do this by law as long as you stay away from houses and use common sense like you say. It is literally translated as 'every mans rights' (See also this question on Travel-SE for more information). In the summer these countries are perfect for this kind of holiday and I can recommend it to you very much. In ...


35

Let's take this one step at a time. First you must own jeans. Here's your problem - you'll want them to be worth a bit. You can buy jeans for anything from $5 to a few hundred dollars if you really want to in western clothing stores. Let's say an expensive pair - US$200, and I assure you I've never spent that much on a pair of jeans. Now let's assume you ...


33

France Wild camping is allowed except in specific protected places, depicted here: Anyway there are many local rules, so the best is to find the city hall of the village where you want to camp and ask there. An alternative to city hall is church, where the priest might be able to tell you whether the local church owns some field in the country side. If ...


31

No problem, many people do it all the time. Rick Steves, the travel writer of the 'Europe through the back door' guide books did it himself and that was years ago. It's arguably safer now. Accommodation - hostels. Use sites like Hostelbookers to find accommodation (book early if possible, they can fill up). They're social, fun, and you'll find lots of ...


30

There are two options, both roughly equidistant and neither an obvious winner: Japan is about 10 hours from Sydney, with direct flights to Tokyo. While snow is rare in Tokyo itself, there is tons of the white stuff anywhere in the Japan Alps (eg. Nagano), on the Japan Sea coast (eg. Kanazawa) and up in Hokkaido, where ski bunny haven Niseko has become a ...


29

You can do that. since one-way tickets are (almost) always more expensive. Booking a flexible return ticket will also be more expensive than the single ticket version, but you should look into it, since it should be cheaper than the double-return tickets in most cases. But you better make sure that you know where and how to buy a ticket in Hong Kong and how ...


29

If you've got a contactless credit or debit card, you don't need an oyster card. Since September 2014 you can just tap in using that contactless card everywhere you can use an Oyster card, and it charges you the same rate as an Oyster card, with the same daily capping policy. (there are other high tech "contactless" options too like NFC smartphone apps ...


27

You are 18 and travelling to Europe for the first time and want to know if it's safe, and what other things you should be aware of. I assume you are an American or Canadian. I also assume you will be unemployed and with few, if any, demonstrable ties to your home country. Unforeseen Obstacles The first and foremost thing to be aware of is the likelihood ...


26

Well they travel as cheaply as possible. There are lots of tricks and lots of levels. No matter how cheaply you do it you always meet people in comparison to whom your expenses seem ridiculously extravagant! The main three factors in a trip are 1) accommodation 2) transport 3) food You can save on all these at multiple levels depending on your sense of ...


26

That used to be true, back in the 1980s, in the Soviet Bloc countries, because: blue jeans were the fashion trend then and there they were not available on the market, at all (not "sold out", not "in small quantities", not at all.) thus providing an opportunity for home-made imitations and for scarce (rare even) black-market goods Now, that's a textbook ...


25

If you pay by Dollar (or home currency) The hotel will add a charge for this, hence you will be paying more. If you pay by local currency the exchange rate will be decided by the credit card company or bank. These exchange rates are much better than the hotel rates. Check this Visa page for more information regarding this service for Visa holders. AFAIK, ...


25

A lot of hotel booking sites offer free cancellation up to the day of the stay as an option that costs a few EUR or USD more. Business-oriented booking sites sometimes even have cancellation up to early evening of first day of the stay. (HRS.de is advertising this on TV right now in Germany as their main feature). I would pay the few more dollars for that, ...


23

Lauren (co-founder of Flightfox) here. I can't tell you exactly what's going on in this contest but I can give you a general answer. Our experts come from many walks of life. Some are travel agents who really know their way around fare rules and ticketing. Some are frequent flyers who have learned from experience. And others are just pure travel hackers who ...


23

ConsumerReports.org has done the analysis. Obviously it'll be different for every car and shape and size of roof rack, and contents of the rack, but in their experiment: 2013 Honda Accord (4-cyl.) MPG (Miles Per Gallon) @ 65 mph = 105 km/h ---------------------------------------------- No rack 42 mpg = 5.6 l/100km ...


23

Samoa Air does, but the demographics make the reason for that obvious. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10127347/Samoa-Air-introduces-XL-class-for-larger-passengers.html Also an individual passenger's weight is not that important until we are on very small planes.


22

The metro is only €1,70 per ride, and if you buy a carnet of 10 the price is €13.30 for all 10. Probably your best bet. I hate cycling because of the issues with locking it up, worrying about theft, and if you're in the upper arrondissements going uphill on cobblestone sounds like a miserable experience I would rather spare myself from. The city is ...


21

Not sure if this is quite the scenario you are outlining, but: If you're really really broke, chances are you won't be eating at restaurants or places that require tipping in the first place :) At least in the US, tipping is not the norm (or is completely optional - eg. tip jar might be present) at fast food (McD, Chipotle), sandwich shops (Subway) or other ...


21

When I've needed to do this in the past I've used Victoria Coach Station's left luggage facilities, which are cheaper and more flexible than the rail stations. There are details on TFL: Deposits up to two hours: £2.50 per item (no weight consideration) Deposits 2-24 hours: £4 per item under 20kg Deposits 2-24 hours: £6 per item over 20kg Multiple days ...


21

A summary of fuel dumping and the ethics of it are on My philosophy on Fuel Dumping on hackmytrip.com: Fuel dumping is a method by which a fuel surcharge on an international fare is removed through the addition of one or more additional unrelated segments. Because of IATA (International Air Transport Association) rules that few people understand ...



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