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12

If you do a search with the terms sushi com chocolate (sushi with chocolate) you will find plenty of recepies. Nevertheless, it's certainly not a trend, I have ate sweet sushi before but I had never heard of norimaki with chocolate before. It's really common to find sweet temakis ("sweet kones") for dessert, I wouldn't be surprised to find one with ...


10

According to TripAdvisor it's rare to get automatic transmissions in Brazil, or that when the companies do have them, they're regularly more expensive. Your best bet is to contact the company before you get to Brazil (from comments of yours on other questions I gather you've booked through Modiva), and find out if you can reserve one. I suspect they'll be ...


8

Try searching for "temaki de chocolate" instead. Searching for '"temaki de chocolate" Brasilia', for instance, got me the Sushiloko chain and a number of other restaurant mentions (I think - I don't speak Portuguese). It looks as if temaki with chocolate and banana, in particular, is certainly not unheard of.


7

Source: Rio de Janeiro City Hall web site. Convetional Taxis: Ride starts at R$ 4.80. Price 1 - R$1.95/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Price 2 - R$ 2.34/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., and, Sunday and Holidays all day) For each hour stationary - R$ 24.57 (this is a reference value). ...


5

I lived in Copacabana. There are 3 options: Individual-operated cabs - yellow cabs which doesn't have a company name written on its side. Don't take those, they can be dangerous. Company-operated cabs - companies that are allowed to get people from the airport. The company name will be stamped in the car. There will probably be a line of people in the ...


5

The seats with different colors (and the color differ from company to company or city to city), are reserved for elder or pregnant or handicapped people, or people with baby in arms. That's for the whole country, not only Vitória. You may sit there, but you should give your seat if someone in these conditions appear. In some countries this doesn't exist ...


3

I confirmed this with a few Brazilians (I'm currently in Sao Paulo). Depending on the bus and the bus route, the turnstile might be at the front or a bit more to the back. This is related to whether the bus needs doors for entry on both sides. The turnstile needs to be after the entry door located furthest to the back. Exit is through one of the back ...


3

There are buses from Santa Cruz to San Matias in Eastern Bolivia, on the border to Brazil. It takes around 15-18 hours on dirt roads. Once in Mato Grosso (on your way to Cáceres) the roads are very good and modern. You won't easily find information on buses online, just go to the bus terminal once you're there in Santa Cruz and buy your ticket. Don't plan ...


3

I am from Brazil and I will try to help you. According to "Departamento Estadual de Trânsito de São Paulo" (Sao Paulo State Transit Department), here what they say about foreigner citizen driving in Brazil: Portuguese: "Ao ingressar no país, o condutor estrangeiro poderá dirigir com a Carteira de Habilitação do país de origem (desde que dentro do seu ...


3

I am not Brazilian, and I successfully created a car rental reservation with Movida (http://www.movida.com.br/) to rent a car for 3 days during the World Cup. It was cheaper than going thru a service like Kayak or Priceline, etc. You pay in Brazilian Reales, it cost me about 220 BRL. Brazilian company websites are kinda of mess in the UI/globalization ...


3

We recently added a lot of routes from Brazil here at Busbud. You can travel across Brazil by booking bus tickets via our platform. You can compare companies, prices and schedules, some of these trips are very long, 50 hours for Sao Paulo - Fortaleza! The Brazilian Gringo will give you more tips about travelling by bus in Brazil on his blog. You can browse ...


3

Layoverguide for Rio suggests a minimum of four hours as a slot to allow a tiny viewing bit of the city. So assuming an hour outside, that still allows three, but that's tight for you. Another traveller online suggests that they've gotten through customs in 30-60 minutes on several occasions, however have once missed a flight with a 1h45 layover. You ...


3

Yes, I have done this twice for the same reason (but with an Israeli passport). Check into the flight with your SA passport There is no passport control on the way out of the US Enter Brazil on your SA passport Check into the return flight showing your US passport Exit Brazil on your SA passport Enter the US on your US passport Sometimes the airline will ...


3

Valenca is right next to Morro, so it should not be a surprise that trip will be much cheaper. I'm convinced you'd be able to get local transport to Valenca through Feira, but it's likely to be cumbersome and time consuming. Typically, for out of the way destinations, local public transport might only be available a few times per day. As an alternative, ...


3

You're asking for opinions, which are very personal. But... Peru has plenty to offer. You're probably flying into Lima, but not one person I've ever spoken to who has been to Lima has said it was a city worth visiting. Because of that, I skipped it on my trip this year (though I am stopping by next year). Distances in Peru (and South America) are huge. ...


2

I suspect you've already been on your trip and, if so, had a great time. I've done the trip a few times before and its probably my favourite place for wildlife. You can see lots of animals and sights without a guide - travelling along the transpantaneira in a rental car, for example. Pantanal Lodges are still worthwhile since they'll have access to some ...


2

I recently came back from a 6 month trip to Argentina where I also visited Iguazu falls. I only stayed on the Argentine side instead of crossing over to the Brazilian side. I will tell you one thing that I didn't see mentioned in the comments. You should add way more time to whatever you plan on doing because it is currently summer in the Southern ...


2

I've never been to Brazil, but I will be there for the World Cup. I have found http://www.buscaonibus.com.br/ to be a pretty good resource to find bus routes and booking fares on the major bus companies. Flying right now, as of March 2014, is getting pretty expensive (even on domestic/low-cost airlines) and since the cheaper seats have been taken. Unless ...


2

Well, in Brazil you can get automatic transmission, and like @Mark said, it's more expensive. However, be advised when rent "popular" models with manual transmission. In general, the most cheap models are insecure (no ABS, no air-bags...). There are some companies you can contact: Avis Locaralpha Mistercar Localiza


2

TL;DR Get a VITUR Visa which costs Rs. 1600 and is valid for a maximum of 5 years. Write a letter to them explaining your situation and you'll be good to go! A list of documents and important information is also given on the New Delhi Embassy website. As you might have already guessed you're gonna need a Tourist Visa of the VITUR Category. The price of ...


2

Yours spider is not listed by CITES, so it is not forbidden to bring your pet to one off the member states if you comply with the local import rules. It seems that your friend would need to apply for an import permit: For species not listed, the requirements are not known. However, exporters wanting to ship livestock or germplasm whose requirements are ...


2

You may want to check your visa. Brazilian tourist visas are for 90 days, not the more vague '3 months', to avoid such confusion. Example from Wikipedia: Of course you may have realised this already, as in your case, 90 days including Feb 25 IS May 25, but for future readers I'm clarifying this. Your visa is valid for this entire period, and as you ...


2

It's not night here, in most of the games. First phase they were 1PM, 5PM (which there's still daylight) and 7PM. Now they are at 1PM and 5PM. It gets dark in the middle/end of the second game, though.


2

Yes you can. Although the right answer is very dependent on your personal interests, here are a few pointers to get you started: Do a 'free' walking tour. They work for tips, so it's not really free, but it's an easy and friendly way to get to know a bit of the city. Spend time at Ibirapuera Park. There are several decent museums in the park, and it's a ...


2

I found a website where the bus connection is shown. But obviously it isn't such a good route as the person stated it would be, so probably I will take a bus to Salvador and then a transfer via boat to Morro de Sao Paulo. Seems to be the fastest and cheapest alternative, though I didn't expect it to be...


1

You ask many questions, and the answers are several. Yes, you can buy and own a french car while not being a resident. You can insure it either through your own company in whatever country you are in (for a short or long term period) or through a french company. The price might be high, since you might not offer the highest guarantee for the french ...


1

You have to contact your local Argentinian embassy / consulate in Brazil who will determine if you're eligible to get an Argentinian visa. I'm speculating here but given that you're a non-resident in Brazil, the Argentinian consulate MAY ask you to obtain a visa from your home country, the Philippines. I understand that you obtained a visa for Panama while ...


1

I'm staying at Hotel do Papai, run by two older Lebanese (I think) men (and their fairly pretty daughters). A self contained single is 80R$ (about 27 euros), including breakfast and good wifi. It's in the center and seems to be on the low end, price wise, compared to hotels in the direct vicinity. Driving into town, I passed a bunch of fairly shabby looking ...


1

You should get confirmation from immigration, but I'm quite sure that whether you had a student visa for Brazil does not affect your obtaining a tourist visa afterwards. As a British citizen you can obtain a visa/stamp at the border. Upon entry, you might be asked to show proof of future departure. My point above is related to the fact that on a tourist ...


1

This doesn't exist. In general this type of data has not been much mobilized in Brazil, despite the Law of Access to Information and the Open Government/Open Data movement. The link you provide says that the online tool will be released for mobile phones too, but doesn't say when, and knowing the Brazilian bureaucracy's glacial pace of achivement, I ...



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