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14

As someone who travelled a lot and stayed in many hostels let me say I also saw similar behaviour in many places, not only hostels but also on buses and at tourist sites. This is not limited to South America, but also happens in South East Asia and India. When speaking to Israelis who travel alone and are usually a little bit older they confirmed my ...


12

This is how we did it today: From the Puerto Iguazu (Argentina) bus station a bus of the travel company "Crucero del Norte" goes directly to the Waterfall Park on the Brazilian side. This bus leaves every 2 hours. The last bus going back again starts at 5 pm. It cost 50 pesos per person going there and back. The ride took about 45 minutes. The bus departs ...


12

I spent a few months in Brazil, I didn't speak any Portuguese and my Spanish is not that good either. So it didn't help me understanding people, but it helped a little reading signs, and they could almost always understand my basic Spanish. Can I get around there with English and a little Spanish? It really depends on where you are going and how deep you ...


11

I have not been to Brazil myself yet, but this is on my list, so here is what my research thus far has found. As hippietrail pointed out, the Carnaval in Rio (and in Sao Paulo) has grown to be a huge event that requires a purpose-built stadium in each city. These Carnavals are put on as big mega-parades by Samba Schools and are nowadays meant to be seen ...


11

There is a bus station in Puerto Iguazu and buses leave every hour or so for the Argentinian side of the falls and were fairly cheap. You have to pay an entrance fee for the park and can get optional boat tours of the river below the falls and above them. I did both and it was worth it. The Argentinian side has walkways and bridges that take you right out ...


11

Generally the burden is on you to prove onward travel. Whether that be air or land. Some case examples: I flew into Canada, and was going to bus to the USA. I had to prove I had a bus ticket to leave I flew into Argentina, with the intention of busing around South America. I had a return ticket to the UK. This was fortunate, as it at least showed I ...


10

According to TripAdvisor it's rare to get automatic transmissions in Brazil, or that when the companies do have them, they're regularly more expensive. Your best bet is to contact the company before you get to Brazil (from comments of yours on other questions I gather you've booked through Modiva), and find out if you can reserve one. I suspect they'll be ...


9

First of all, an airline is not required to check anybody in. By purchasing a ticket, you have entered into an agreement with a private company, and assented to all the terms of their Contract of Carriage. Written into every airline's CoC will be a clause allowing them to deny you passage under various conditions. You may be entitled to be rebooked for a ...


8

On Brazilian side it is possible (unlike the Argentinian side) to pay with credit cards, so you don't really need to have Reals in cash. There is a bus between Puerto Iguazu (city on Argentinian side) and Foz do Iguacu (Brazilian city), and when you're in Brazil, you can take another bus to the entry to the park. It is bus No. 120 to 'Parque Nacional'.


8

OK, December 31st is not a public holiday in Brazil but January 1st is. The Wikipedia article on Rio de Janeiro states in the public transport section that buses run 24 hours, but the metro runs a Sunday service on public holidays (new years day happens to be a Sunday next year anyway) Rest of week metro service: 5am - 12am Sunday metro service: 7am - 11pm ...


8

the outlets don't vary between regions in the country, but a new standard has been "invented" pissing everybody off because it's unique to Brazil, not seen in any other country...very clever! So if you go to a newer property or if it's been recently renovated, you see a deep outlet that looks like this: Photo thanks to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons. If ...


8

In the past, it was fairly common to do "border runs" - when your 90 days were up as a backpacker, you'd exit the country for a few hours, and come right back in. I met many people doing this in most South American countries. In the past, the common way would be to do a border run. Head over from Foz Iguazu to Iguazu, spend the day checking out the falls, ...


8

There is an entire tourism section on the government site for the dam. On the matter of the spillways, it says (emphasis mine): Watch the spillway in action between the months of December and February when the steel floodgates are open during the rainy season. The opening of the spillway does not follow a preset schedule. It is directly linked to the ...


7

I'm Brazilian and I live in Rio, and I can tell you from first-hand experience. Buses do work on New Year, but if you plan on taking a bus to either go to the most crowded spots, or to leave from them after the fireworks, keep in mind it will be slow. Painfully slow. Anyone going to Copacabana beach after 5~6pm of Dec. 31 will experience traffic jams and ...


7

"Do you just buy a ticket to Rio, book any hotel and just enjoy?" That's about exactly what I did for my visit in February 2009. Well I chose my hotel carefully - a decent hotel - search engines are your friend as are reviews. I chose a major airline as well. I booked tickets to the Sambadrome online and for one of the Samba school balls at a ticket seller ...


7

The US citizens are required to have expensive visas to Brazil in "reciprocation" for US visas for Brazilians. Even if there is a stopover, a transit visa is required. As far as I know, that the only exception of this rule is São Paulo-Guarulhos Airport. If your stopover is there, and you don't leave airport (don't try to go trough customs), you don't need ...


7

I'll answer my own question after staying in Rio and doing the trekking. This trail is completly safe in all sense. There are police controls in the first part of the trail (the Pista Cláudio Coutinho) and in the upper part (the cable-car station). In reality, all the area is a militar settlement, so I doubt that anybody try to attack you there. In the ...


7

When you are traveling inter-state the buses usually have better amenities than most cheaper airlines, water/tv/ac/etc. And yes, they are safe to go anywhere. I have traveled from Pernambuco in the Northeast to Bahia and Rio Grande do Norte multiple times, including travels inside of the Pernambuco state. They could look something like this: ...


6

Here is a good site where you can check on the type of power used in different countries and the outlets. Wikitravel will also usually give you good information. In Brazil it seems that different parts of the country use different voltages and outlets. Some are 110V and use the North American outlet, and others are 220/240V and use the European outlet. The ...


6

You need the drivers license from your home country an international drivers license that serves as a translation. Even if there is no legal requirement for this (I found conflicting information on this), you cannot rely that the policeman who stops you in the road nor the clerk at the car rental knows English well enough to read your US license. There ...


6

Based on the discussions on similar forums the burden of proof of onward travel is on you and whether or not to accept something as proof of onward travel would be entirely in the discretion of the Immigration officer when you arrive. Now if you are concerned about whether or not your ticket from Santiago to Auckland is sufficient proof of onward travel you ...


6

A tourist in Brazil can stay for a maximum of 90 consecutive days, extendable to 180 days every one year by issuing a request at the Federal Police Department (DPF). That's not automatic; you must go to the nearest Federal Police office and fill a form and pay a fee (currently R$ 67.00 or US$ 30.70). Be prepared to present them the usual information you need ...


6

Source: Rio de Janeiro City Hall web site. Convetional Taxis: Ride starts at R$ 4.80. Price 1 - R$1.95/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Price 2 - R$ 2.34/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., and, Sunday and Holidays all day) For each hour stationary - R$ 24.57 (this is a reference value). ...


5

The one and only country-wide official source is the website of the Agencia Nacional de Transportes Terrestres (ANTT), the Brazilian’s government official body for road transportation. Apparently its an unfriendly website to get to grips with. This blog entitled "Brazil Travel Blog - 7 years travelling throughout Brazil" provides additional resources for ...


5

I just found an answer on yahoo anwsers (Portuguese). There are boats that take you from Manaus to Leticia. You just buy the ticket directly in the boat, there are no agencies. The schedule is a bit irregular but as a rule of thumb they go out every other day. The journey takes around 5 to 7 days. If two boats depart on the same day (apparently it can ...


5

Yes. Emirates offers nonstop flights from Dubai (which is on the continent of Asia) to both Rio de Janeiro (GIG) and São Paulo (GRU). Qatar Airways has nonstop service from Doha to São Paulo. Near-misses: Etihad has announced that it will fly from Abu Dhabi to São Paulo starting in June 2013. Turkish Airlines flies from ...


5

I did some "googling" and the only thing I cam up with was this blog: http://culturadoam.blogspot.com.br/ (Portuguese) This is the cultural agenda of the Amazonas region, as it seems, where the theatre is included. It seems that the "Festival Amazonas de Ópera" is currently on the theater. I talked to a friend that was there very recently and she confirmed ...


5

The official answer appears to be NO. I e-mailed the Brazilian Consulate in Houston, and this was their (ambiguous) response: Dear Sir/Madam, Tourist visa applications require the presentation of the itinerary. Please contact this office once you have certain plans. You don't have to present a purchased plane ticket. A round trip ...


5

This information is not true. There are no restrictions on foreigners buying tickets in Brazilian airline companies. I can assure you that, at least in the two largest companies (TAM and GOL), any foreigner can buy tickets including low cost. The only thing you need to do is change the country configuration to your counry (U.S. i presume) and buy your ...



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