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8

The safest approach to arrive in any city is to arrange for your hotel to pick up you, meaning there will be a guy with a sign with your name on it waiting for you right outside Customs. Just give them a ring and ask about "airport transfer" or "airport shuttle service". The obvious downside is that this is usually expensive, often 2-4x the cost of a taxi. ...


4

I live here in Bolivia (Tarija). First of all you should never fly into La Paz. Santa Cruz is the better option as they are less likely to steal your stuff when you go through customs. As far as staying in the airport, if you are not waiting for a layover then by all means take a taxi to your hotel. I would suggest that you have your hotel pick you up as ...


3

Some airports charge their own departure fee (to help fund airport operations) that is not included in the ticket price. Until about 2009 or so, this was also the case for the airport in Christchurch, New Zealand (I think it was about NZ$25). At that time they changed to include the departure fee in the ticket price for departing passengers. This makes it a ...


3

Very easy. There are tours in both directions - I went from San Pedro to Uyuni, and they go back as well. You join up to a 2 night tour, for example, and then it finishes in San Pedro de Atacama itself - and the town is tiny, so you can walk from one side to the other very simply. I went with Tierra Mystica, and aside from claiming to have an English ...


2

I hope someone with direct experience can give you some information. After a quick google, I'd say that I'd feel somewhat comfortable (as a guy) taking a reputable-looking cab from the airport directly to a hotel at 3:30am or whenever your flight lands and you get your stuff. I have a pretty good sense for who to trust and have avoided being robbed a ...


2

RometoRio shows a route for both bus and train. Several, in fact. Each varies by price, and time, for obvious reasons, and it's shown alongside some flight prices as well, if that's a possible consideration. The bus option looks brutal, however, as they're only finding one that goes via Argentina(!), taking 3 days. The train, on the other hand looks more ...


2

Have you looked at the map? That's a long ways away. I don't know exactly but it's going to take a few days to get from Uyuni to Iguazu. What's going to take you longest is having to stop at destinations while waiting for the next busy. I recommend not trying to go straight through and instead make a few stops and enjoy the local places where very few people ...


2

You need to check to see if your international license permits you to drive a motorcycle. Bolivia, like most other countries, expects you to have a special license to ride a motorcycle. Here in Bolivia there are check points checking to see if you have the correct paperwork. Being a foreigner they will probably give you more trouble than if you were a ...


2

If your objective is to get to San Pedro, it makes sense to do an Uyuni to San Pedro tour, instead of doing an Uyuni to Uyuni tour, followed by a trip to San Pedro. Both are readily available from plenty of tourist agencies in Uyuni. There is no public transport from Uyuni to San Pedro (besides the multi-day tours). You would have to first take a bus from ...


1

The airport departure fee as of August 2014 is 20 US$. I (the OP) however didn't had to pay it as it somehow was already included in the ticket price (despite the warning on the website). I got the sticker, confirming that I paid the fee, on my boarding pass at check in. My advice: ask your airline at check in when departing from La Paz!


1

My general strategy for safety in situations like this is not to look like an easy victim. In particular: Know the general route and driving distance to your hotel from the airport. If Google Maps has driving directions in the city you're travelling to, use it. If the driver deviates from it (GPS on your phone can be useful here) immediately say "Hey this ...


1

I have it on good authority (multiple sources) that there have not been passenger services between Calama and Bolivia since 2009. However, I also have it on not-so-good authority (conflicting sources) that goods services are still running. And I myself have seen locomotives move back and forth at the border.


1

When I used to live in Bolivia 5 years ago - I would never go for the cheapest and would try to go on "bus cama" buses more. And also Trans. Copacabana bus cama buses probably had the better reputation from memory (for Bolivian standards)


1

You can go on a tour from San Pedro de Atacama (in Chile) which takes 3/4 days, visits sites in both Chile and Bolivia and will get you back to San Pedro, for about 200USD. As an alternative, you can get a bus from Calama to Uyuni, which takes 7-9 hours, depending on border formalities, while the bus only runs by day and only on 4 days a week. The ticket is ...


1

You can get there from Sucre, Potosí or Tupiza. They also have an airport so you have the option of flying in. Source: I live in Tarija. I give tours of Tarija.


1

You need to be a resident in Bolivia and have a reason for going in(know someone who is convicted). If you go in you will probably take fleas home with you. Source: I live in Tarija, Bolivia



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