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10

That's entirely possible. Firstly, there are no trains. Seriously. Don't bother trying to find them. In Argentina there's one from Buenos Aires to Rosario, but the bus is cheaper AND faster. There are some tourist trains in North Argentina (near Salta) and yes, there is the train from Cusco in Peru to Aguas Calientes, but that's about it. I'll discuss ...


9

I've done a tour of the Salt flats in January 2010 which is the summer down there and even then it got cold at night because it is pretty high up - 3,656 meters (11,995 ft). I did a tour with a local operator as everybody else did, there are dozens of 4x4s out there every day. The accommodation was indeed very basic, especially on the second night. We ...


8

Most tours to Salar de Uyuni start from Uyuni town, you can get there both by train and bus from further north in Boliva. We took a bus from Potosi in the morning and arrived in the mid afternoon, at least 5 hours. Nice landscape but bad roads, our bus broke down twice. From Sucre you can go via Potosi, but I am not sure whether you can do the whole way ...


8

We do it from Peru side. You have to go to Puno port and buy one of the excursions they sell that could be just for a lake trip or you can stay one night with a family in Taquile or Amantani islands. That option is very recommendable. You also have the option to talk with a fisherman and negotiate a better price, but my advice is to buy a tourist ...


7

The tours of the prison used to be possible in the past, but with the publication of the book 'Marching Powder' they became very popular and the government finally cracked down on the whole situation in the prison. It is no longer possible to do the tours or get into the prison (unless you are convicted to serve time there)


7

G Adventures provide a lot of South American tours. They also monitor any safety updates in that region for their travellers. Here's a timeline of updates and safety info within the last few months: http://www.gadventures.com/safety-updates/


7

It's actually longer than 24 hours. The most common route is from La Paz through to Iquique, and then down to Santiago. The Santiago->Iquique leg alone takes 24 hours. I can recommend either Pullman (we used them for that) or Tur Bus (used them for other shorter trips). I blogged about it as well. From Iquique to La Paz it took us 16 hours. However, ...


7

Actually, you can reach it easily from three different directions/starting points. From Chile, you'd be departing from San Pedro de Atacama. From Bolivia, either Uyuni or Tupiza. There IS a train, from Calama in Chile, but it's so unreliable and nobody knew if it was even running. Although while driving from Uyuni to La Paz at night, I did see it going ...


7

The safest approach to arrive in any city is to arrange for your hotel to pick up you, meaning there will be a guy with a sign with your name on it waiting for you right outside Customs. Just give them a ring and ask about "airport transfer" or "airport shuttle service". The obvious downside is that this is usually expensive, often 2-4x the cost of a taxi. ...


6

Besides the trips from Puno the other popular boat ride on Lake Titicaca is to go to Isla Del Sol, an island on the Bolivian side. You can either do a day trip from the Bolivian town of Copacabana close to the Peruvian border, or stay on the island in one of the numerous basic guest houses. You can easily spend a day walking around the island and go ...


5

No for both countries: Peru: With a few exceptions (notably some Asian, African and communist countries), visas are not required for travelers entering Peru. Tourists are permitted a 30- to 90-day stay, which is stamped into their passports and onto a tourist card, called a Tarjeta Andina de Migración (Andean Immigration Card), that you must ...


5

Short answer: You really can't. Long answer: The most direct way (ie not taking a Potosi bus and connecting) is to take just two buses. The first bus will be from Uyuni to La Paz. This can take 12-15 hours depending on the time of day, the bus company, your driver (some will pull over for a few hours to sleep!) and stops (some stop in El Alto to drop off ...


5

I used Wikitravel. Being a wiki, quite often people will enter info about strikes - I found the road between Uyuni and La Paz was closed two weeks before and two weeks after I went through, and I got that via Wikitravel. Note that from Cusco, you will most likely travel to Puno first. It's a small, mostly dull town, but from there you have two travel ...


5

I did a 2 days boat tour with a home stay on Lago Titicaca this February. The boat leaves Puno at around 9am and we arrive at Taquille Island about 2.5 hours later. Taquille Island looks like a very peaceful paradise where the community leads a very simple life. The altitude will start weighing on you as you climb towards the middle of the island if you ...


5

Very possible. Last year, with a friend, we bussed from La Paz, Bolivia in the early morning to Puno, Peru, on the west side of the lake. By mid afternoon we'd checked into our hostel and booked and were on a trip to the Uro Islands on the lake. We had a storm on the lake as we were leaving the islands, which added to the dramatic landscape and scenery. ...


5

Yes, you can travel to Oruro by bus from Potosí or Sucre, and from there you can take the train or bus to Uyuni. As Peter mentions it can be hard to find accommodation in Uyuni late at night so arriving earlier is recommended. Oruro train station is on the road Velasco Galvarro slightly south of the centre of town. It usually doesn't open until a couple of ...


4

As far as I know there are no passenger trains in the north of Chile and certainly not all the way to La Paz. The only trains in Chile run south of Santiago to Talca. The train station in Antofagasta looks like it has not been used in many years. Your information must be very old. Buses are your only choice on the ground, unless you drive yourself.


4

I also started in Uyuni, on a standard three day tour you spend the first day on the salt lake, getting off it in the evening, then going further south the second day visiting various lakes and rock formations, the third day you are going back to Uyuni. If you want to go to San Pedro you are dropped off at the border to Chile in the morning of the third ...


4

It will depend on how much time you have. Salar de Uyuni is HUGE (10,582 square kilometers), and not only you will need time to get there, but also to see the many different facets of it. Still, it is possible to visit it from Chile if you have enough time. You can get a train from Avaroa on the Chilean border, but keep in mind the schedule is not exactly ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think there's many options in Uyuni for accommodation. I slept in the same place Peter mentions, and I was honestly anxious when it began to get colder and colder outside. The 'common area' was fine though, the tour guides (a really nice couple) gave us some sleeping bags and there were also blankets in the room. It might be because ...


4

Long-distance buses connect Puno to La Paz, some of them are really comfortable (buses from Peru are generally better than Bolivian ones). There are two things you can't miss when connecting those cities, so I'd recommend you make at least one stop in the middle. There are plenty of connecting buses, so it shouldn't be a problem. Copacabana is one of the ...


4

None is completely reliable in that part of the world. Bring plenty of patience and plan a good amount of time between bus arrivals and departures. The La Paz - Uyuni segment is the roughest. While you can do half (Potosi-Uyuni) on train which is more comfortable, it makes logistics more complicated. Train cancellations are common and so are bus ones but at ...


4

So there are two options. 1) You're planning on doing a Salt Flats tour, if you're going to Uyuni? Most of these run from Uyuni to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, or vice versa, and take 3ish days. It's well worth it and you should consider that if you haven't already, as it'll make the next part really easy. Once you're in San Pedro, there are buses over ...


4

EDITED: You get an international driving permit from your home country: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Driving_Permit No problem at all to rent motorcycles and cars with that if you have the requirement in your original driving license. While the convention says that you should have your original driving license available I never have done ...


3

I am visiting Lake Titicaca next week and will be taking a tour offered by All Ways Travel. I chose them based on the recommendations from my friends who have taken Lake Titicaca tours with them. Lonely planet and other travel guide books also recommended them. Again, I am yet to go there so take my advice with a pinch of salt!


3

The Footprint travel guide site has a good page about the park in English. They describe how to get to the park independently and also mention a camp ground within the park at Los Fierros. I did not quote the relevant parts here, as I am not sure about the copyright implications. I think if there is a road in Bolivia, you can also park there. They are ...


3

By bus, the easiest is going to be a stop in La Paz, Bolivia. You have two options from Puno. The direct - through the border and round the south side of Lake Titicaca to La Paz. It doesn't take that long - about 5 hours from memory, although I've heard it can take 8. Option B is the ferry through to Copacobana. It's meant to be quite the experience, but ...


3

I don't think you will have any problems with theft in the buses. They are used by either tourists or people working (and I honestly suggest you keep an eye on tourists!). But don't expect comfortable and 100% reliable buses with air con and snacks. Buses from Peru and Chile are usually better than Bolivian ones, and around La Paz there are quite alright. ...


3

The nearest airport, UYU, is a domestic airport; you will need to connect at La Paz (LPB). Amaszonas and TAM offer UYU-LPB services. Arequipa, for its part, has limited international service, and you would need to connect on a LAN or TACA flight through Lima (LIM).


3

Trains exist in Bolivia but are quite rare. In fact, so rare that asking several travel agencies they all said that no train services were available, yet once in a while I met someone who just arrived by train! Actually considering one of my hotels a few months ago faced the passenger train station in Uyuni, I can say that it does exist. Only for your ...



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