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11

Cycling is generally very safe, particularly in Taito-ku. There aren't any bike lanes really but you're free to cycle on the pavement, as long as you dismount when it's too crowded. Furthermore drivers are used to cyclists, just keep tight to the left on bigger roads. Helmets are seldom worn, even by mothers with a kid on the front, one on the back and one ...


8

Clothes Wear confortable clothes. Try everything heavily before travelling. Remember that you will do the same leg movement for several hours. Seams or other similar things rubbing the skin will "burn" and to the limit hurt. Take lite clothes to cycle. Even with cold weather you will heat up. Weight Try not taking more than 20Kg (the less the better as ...


8

Rental prices are not designed for periods of more than a few days. It might be possible to negotiate a long-term price at a flexible rental business. It's definitely possible to get a decent used bike for 50-100 EUR. There's a risk that it could be a stolen one, but almost none of running into problems, even if it is. I'm pretty sure that shipping a bike ...


8

You can take your bike along in most trains, but not in the ICE. It's probably best to check when you look up the connection online (you can even use it as a search criterium). In some local trains you don't need an extra ticket. It seems to depend on all kinds of factors, including the time of day. In regional and national trains, you always need a ticket ...


7

As already said, the best option would be to buy a used bike. You can find very good offers on eBay kleinanzeigen. You can find a good bike even for under 50 EUR. Another option is wo-bleibt-mein-fahrrad.de. They buy, sell and repair old bikes in Leipzig. I'm not sure if that would be useful for you, but maybe there are some interesting cheap bikes.


7

Open Cycle Map provides a good coverage of Europe. On the GPS section, you can find a device recommendation suited for cycling, as well as how to put Open Street Maps on it.


5

In addition to uncovery's answer: Some tunnels may be disallowed. Even for tunnels that are allowed, Google Maps cycling directions are very (IMO overly) cautious about tunnels, and might refuse a route as soon as there is a 100 metre tunnel. In my experience, the best way to see if tunnels are permitted is through Google Streetview.


5

There are 2 different highway types in Switzerland, Autobahn and Autostrasse. Those are both limited to motorized vehicles that reach 80km/h. Autostrassen are limited to 100km/h, Autobahn 120km/h. Autostrassen are also often narrower and sometimes have only one lane per direction. The road 12/E27 you mention is such a "Autostrasse". There is a list of all ...


5

The pertinent information is here on the gvb.nl site, in Dutch. Bicycles are only allowed in the metro (subway) and in tram line 26, not in other tram lines or bus lines. GVB also doesn't have any trains, if you want to take the bicycle on a train, you'll need different tickets entirely (both for yourself and for the bike). The GVB supplement is valid for ...


5

Indeed it appears online that the Lesovo border is for commercial trucks only, and I can see where you get that view. This blog, for example, notes that the road they are on to the crossing at Malko Tarnavo is almost devoid of traffic, as all the trucks go through the Lesovo border. The Lesovo border was the focus on the news recently when it looked like ...


4

Wellington is actually a very small city geographically surrounded by large hills with several commuter towns that make up greater Wellington, such as Lower Hut, Upper Hut, and Porirua. When using Google maps in the area i suggest using the terrain function. Wellington, It's technically Lower Hutt Top Ten Holiday Park which is 15km (Google says 57 min on a ...


4

Cycling in Tokyo is a popular means of getting around for locals, so as a visitor you should try to experience the city by bicycle. Touring a city by bike gives you a totally different perspective as you become part of the city rather than a regular observer. As stated by others it is acceptable to cycle on both roads and sidewalks, so you're free to cycle ...


4

Dedicated bicycle paths are rare to nonexistant; people ride their bikes on the (usually narrow) sidewalks. Interestingly, there are explicit bicycle lanes marked on crossings, but only there. However, I would still consider it safe since everyone (drivers, pedestrians and cyclists) is very careful, polite and rule-abiding. If you behave similarly, there ...


3

To start with, you should ask the company before you pay. On the other hand, it really depends which area of the world you are going to. Law and customs are quite different in different areas of the world. Whereas in the western countries I would expect the operator to have some basic level of insurance cover for accidents, I would expect exactly the ...


3

You can take your bike on Dutch trains. Folding bikes that don't take more space than a normal piece of luggage travel for free, but they must be fully folded during the trip. However, for normal sized bikes you need to buy a bicycle day ticket ("dagkaart fiets") which costs 6,- and can be bought from the ticket vending machines. You will of course also need ...


3

You might consider Warm Showers - it's like couchsurfing, but for cyclists. If you find a member nearby, they may be willing to look after your bike for you for 10 days at their house, which would presumably be secure as they keep their own bike there too.


2

There are several shops in Leipzig renting out shops. The challenging thing there is that the websites for these shops are all in German. However, I am quite sure that calling them in English will be no problem. From the list, I can pick out some that I would recommend: Bikeandsport: Because they are at the main train station in Leipzig and therefore very ...


2

I think I would start with going to a big and respectable bike shop and ask there. There seem to be quite a selection of backpacks especially designed for bikers, you can google for it to get an idea. Then you can ask specifically what is different in these special bike backpacks, etc. If you want to carry your laptop in the backpack, I strongly recommend ...


1

You can find some information here, unfortunately in Italian. Basically you can rent a bike for 15€ for the entire day. If you want they also provide a basic lunch for 5€. This should be the location of the office: Piazza Einaudi 8 25015 - Desenzano del Garda Brescia Italy - +39 (030) 9142268 - desenzano@cts.it I suppose they speak English, maybe you can ...


1

Have you considered getting a pannier rather than using a back pack? I cycle to work with a change of clothes and a laptop as well as all my cycling maintenance gear in my pannier and it's great. You also avoid arriving at your destination with a sweaty back. Also you are probably better off asking questions like this on the Bicycles Stack Exchange site.


1

Here's my own answer: It's OK to ride a bicycle on any road in Switzerland except an Autobahn/Autostrasse. These are easy to recognize (for Americans) because they're akin to interstate highways in the U.S.: Limited access points, multiple lanes each direction, and high speeds. You're not that likely to accidentally enter one on a bicycle. You can also ...


1

Technically yes, because the Williamsburg bridge has a cycle path? But in reality, it all depends on where you are going from/to. Check here to map yourself a route: http://www.nycbikemaps.com/maps/nyc-bike-map/


1

It certainly exists for the USA: RentaBikeNow.com help cyclists find and reserve rental bikes 24/7 Shop, it allows you to compare and reserve items from participating bike shops when it’s convenient for you. Reservations can be made at more than 250 bike shops.



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