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18

The Bike Rental in London supports casual hire, which is aimed at tourists. You can buy either online, or using a credit/debit card at the docking station. The casual hire page even has a handy set of instructions in photo gallery form!


16

Short answer: Yes, it's possible! Long answer: You will have to inform yourself with the airline you're flying with if they allow bikes on the plane, how much it costs, and how big the box you put it in can maximum be. Also it might be interesting to know if they allow cardboard boxes (otherwise you will have to get yourself a hard-case box to put your ...


15

In German cities you can use "Call a Bike" from the Deutsche Bahn. You need only a credit card to open the lock of the bike. You can drive wherever you want and leave it wherever you want. There are a iPhone and Android-App, too. More details at: http://www.callabike-interaktiv.de/index.php?id=401& (unfortunately only in German, but maybe you'll find an ...


15

OK, you're at the stage where you have a ton of questions. I'm in a similar position about long distance walking actually, but that's a different story for another time. Firstly, I should probably plug our Bicycles.Stackexchange.com site. For the actual bicycle questions part of your trip, they're going to be a handy resource. One of the biggest cycling ...


14

Copenhagen has "city bikes" available for use by anybody. You can pick them up from one of the bike racks scattered across town, insert a 20DKK coin as a deposit, and off you go. You get the 20DKK back when you return the bike to a bike stand. Copenhagen city bike website The only negative thing I found when using them was that they were very popular and ...


14

Short answer: no, you cannot take your bicycle into all German trains (but you can probably reach any destination in Germany). Many trains in Germany carry bicycles. This is particularly true for local trains, but also most intercity (IC) trains. However, the most common train for long-distance travel is the high-speed InterCity Express or ICE. Usually, ...


13

In Brussels, there's a network of 2500 bicycles available spread over 180 stations, run by Villo. You can buy day-tickets for 1,5 euro, week-tickets for 7 euro, or a year-subscription for 30 euro. Further there's a similar rule like in Paris, you have to bring the bike back every 30 minutes, or you pay extra. You can pay at every station using a bank ...


12

Searching Google for "rude place names" turned up this list, which has lots of entries for Europe. This might be useful in conjunction with a traveling salesman solver, to compute an efficient route between several of the points.


12

Dublinbikes offers a 3 Day Ticket for EUR 2. The first half-hour is free, you should pay a small amount if you use the bike longer. You should also know that: On subscription, you also authorise the provider to request a €150 guarantee from your account.This amount will not be debited unless the bike is not returned after a period of 24 hours.


12

Cycling is generally very safe, particularly in Taito-ku. There aren't any bike lanes really but you're free to cycle on the pavement, as long as you dismount when it's too crowded. Furthermore drivers are used to cyclists, just keep tight to the left on bigger roads. Helmets are seldom worn, even by mothers with a kid on the front, one on the back and one ...


11

In Paris, all you need is a credit card (Visa, Mastercard, Amex, Blue Visa). It will charge you 1.70€ for the entire day, provided you return the bicycle every 30 minutes. Renting it for 30-60 minutes will set you back €1, but be aware that longer rental periods can be a bit expensive. You only need to drop the bike back for 2 minutes before you can take it ...


11

Allow me to recommend traveljournal.net. It is developed by me, while traveling the world and optimised for use on the road. It has all the usual features: blog, photo albums, map (you can upload GPS-logs), secure document vault, etc. One of the things that really sets it apart from other options? no advertisements whatsoever and designed to work wherever ...


11

Dirty-flow's answer is not really wrong, however, I want to substantiate it a little bit. To quote from fahrrad-recht.de: Gut zu wissen: Eine Trunkenheitsfahrt (§ 316 StGB) kann nicht nur mit Kraftfahrzeugen, sondern grundsätzlich auch mit dem Fahrrad begangen werden! Eine Trunkenheitsfahrt liegt immer dann vor, wenn das Fahrrad nicht mehr sicher ...


10

In the Netherlands you can rent a bicycle at almost any railway station for €6,50 per day. They require a deposit. Depending on the model the deposit ranges between €50 - 145. Credit card use in the Netherlands is not that common, so often you need to bring cash to rent a bike. On this site you can find the station and the telephone number.


10

You can check famous cycle paths for estimations. The most famous along your 3) From Switzerland to the Black Sea is the Donau Radweg, which is almost fully cyclable from Donaueschingen in Germany up to Budapest in Hungary. Given durations depend on the kind of trip you want (family, sport, leisure...). It gives approximately: Donaueschingen to Passau: 15 ...


10

I think what you probably want is the OpenStreetMap powered OpenRouteService. When using OpenRouteService, once it has calculated your route, then in the Extras/Download area there's a link for Route Profile. Click that, wait while it processes, and you'll get the profile you're after. You get profiles that look a little like this: If you want to try it ...


10

how to start: Start small. Don't think you can cycle long distances without getting in shape. Even across town may well be a challenge for you right now. So start on that, set yourself REALISTIC goals to get in shape, not just your legs but your arms and lungs as well. Start with say 10km trips, then gradually increase that until you can comfortably drive ...


9

In Ljubljana, Slovenia, they implemented bike service last month. You use it with smart card, which can be purchased at newsstands or special machines located at bus stations. After you buy the card, you have to register via internet (you need credit card). It's free if you check in your bike at a station after an hour. Here it is, explained into details: ...


9

In Oslo, Norway, tourists can rent a bike at the Tourist Information Center(s). The price is NOK 80/day, which is about $15 USD. More info can also be found on this page.


9

What immediately sprang to mind was not as rude as your opening question, but will still upset people in the Bible Belt of the US and probably a few other people too I suppose: Hell, Norway Thanks to Wikipedia & WikiMedia Commons for the photo


9

but there are a lot of blogs online about that stuff and it seems pointless to add another. There are never enough blogs on any topic. See http://the-pastry-box-project.net/chris-coyier/2013-january-2/. What things to consider especially for travel blogs? the backend (where you create your content and config your blog) should be accessible from ...


9

Buses According the general conditions of eurolines (more or less the only paneuropean bus company bicycles are not allowed: 5.5 A maximum of 2 pieces of luggage (suitcases, bags, and packages 70x80x20 cm with a total maximum of 30 kilos) per passenger will be accepted for carriage. Children and Infants are allowed to carry 1 piece of luggage. ...


9

You can take your bike along in most trains, but not in the ICE. It's probably best to check when you look up the connection online (you can even use it as a search criterium). In some local trains you don't need an extra ticket. It seems to depend on all kinds of factors, including the time of day. In regional and national trains, you always need a ticket ...


9

Clothes Wear confortable clothes. Try everything heavily before travelling. Remember that you will do the same leg movement for several hours. Seams or other similar things rubbing the skin will "burn" and to the limit hurt. Take lite clothes to cycle. Even with cold weather you will heat up. Weight Try not taking more than 20Kg (the less the better as ...


8

Each airline has it's own rules. My friend carried his bike on 2 trips. Once it was free and the other time he had to pay some reasonable amount extra. He had to pack it/reassemble as compact as possible (turn and secure the wheel, flip pedals inward, etc.). He then packaged it in plastic tape (or whatever this thing people often wrap their luggage in is ...


8

There is a system in Wrocław, Poland. There are 31 stations in the city. First 20 minutes is free, but you need to register first at http://www.nextbike.pl/ where you need to make a small (1 PLN) bank transfer to authorize yourself, and then you also need a mobile phone or a paypass debit/credit card to unlock the bike.


8

In Lyon there is such a service (Vélo'v). You will be able to get a short-term card but only if your payment card comes with a chip. If it only has a magnetic band you cannot buy the card.


8

It actually worries me a little bit that you are planning such an extensive trip without the capability of estimating yourself how long it will take :) Checking out estimates for other bicycle routes might help you, but my experience is that they are exactly what they are labeled: only estimates. To give you an answer with a higher confidence rate than ...


8

Within England, the answer is The Cycle Streets site which will generate much more accurate and helpful cycling routes than Google, and could certainly be used to get you from London to the coast. It also generates astonishingly traffic-free routes through London itself. Outside England, I can only suggest using the Open Cycle Map, which covers most of ...



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