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30

I am living in Berlin Moabit which is very close to Tegel Airport. Since Tegel and Moabit are not that interesting at the first sight (which is what you catch when running I think), you should take the TXL-Bus (public transport / 2.8€) running every 10 min. from the airport to the inner city. Then you should jump off at U-Bhf Turmstraße (subwaystation) and ...


30

Tickets get checked once in a while, usually by people with nondescript clothes waiting for passengers exiting the platforms or getting into the carriage and revealing themselves as ticket inspectors once the doors close and the train is on the move. Happened to me once or twice when working in Berlin and commuting by public transport for 6+ months a few ...


24

To my experience, tickets get checked by people dressed as passengers, so you cannot notice them when entering the metro and change your path. When the doors close, they rapidly ask everyone to show their tickets. I was checked twice on the same day during my 3-day visit in Berlin, which was quite a shock to me. There are no barriers to enter the metro ...


23

Won't using U1 be faster and easier? Yes - but Google Maps doesn't know about it. Apparently the public transit data in Germany is based exclusively on a cooperation with Deutsche Bahn (which operates the S-Bahn). Other public transit (including regional trains not operated by DB) are not taken into account. They may eventually expand their data base ...


19

Having a car in Berlin is more hassle than a convenience, just because of the parking situation, and the money you spend on parking meters. Driving in Berlin is also not exactly fun with the traffic congestion, or much faster than the bus or subway either. Leave your car at home, save the money and then decide after 3 months if you really need a car in ...


18

Checkpoint Charlie is probably worth seeing anyway but it's very touristy and not quite a piece of the Berlin Wall: The checkpoint has been rebuilt and stands alone in the middle of the street. Incidentally, it became a symbol for several reasons but it was mostly notable as the only checkpoint for members of the allied forces. Other border crossings existed ...


15

For general communist architecture I would start at Alexander Platz and walk down the 'Karl-Marx-Allee' all the way to 'Frankfurter Tor' in Friedrichshain. There is nothing super special there, but the street was used for the big parades and still has a bit of an 'East German' feeling to it. As for bunkers, there are still many around, some of them from the ...


12

This is the official website where you can get all the informations you asked for (in english as well): http://www.bundestag.de/htdocs_e/visits/index.jsp Short summary: There are no restrictions for non-german citizens. You can participate in a guided tour and you can even watch a debate from the tribune of the reichstag for ~1 hour. You need a ...


12

There is an express bus running from Tegel, called very appropriately TXL. It runs to Alexanderplatz (trip takes 25 min), and passes a few hundred meters from Stadtmitte at Unter den Linden. The closest stop would be Unter den Linden/Friedrichstraße. One ride costs 2.40 € for an adult. (The same ticket will be valid for 2 hours on U-Bahn or S-Bahn within ...


12

Via the webiste of the German Railways (bahn.de), it is possible to book a bus from Berlin to Krakow for 29 EUR, even for a departure on a (very) short notice (read: tomorrow). The price for a regular train ticket is 61 EUR. Eurolines will charge you about the same. The travel time by bus or train is 9 - 10 hours. By train you have to change once. The ...


12

You can find some good information on all the possible Berlin public transport tickets on their English language website here. They have a few different short time-period based tickets, which include various tourist discounts. The discounts may or may not be of interest. Otherwise, you can get a day ticket (Tagesticket) for the AB zones for €6.90. That'll ...


11

Any large international car rental firm that operates in both Germany and Spain should work. I just searched via the regular homepages of Hertz and Europcar, and both offered similar rates. It won't be cheap though - around 1000 EUR if you allow only a week for the trip, 2000 if you take a month. Be sure to buy a large enough km package in advance.


11

Leave the car at home. As you say, Berlin has "nearly perfect" public transportation coverage. If you find that you want a car for an errand or for a road trip, rent one. In addition to traditional car rental businesses, there are many short-term "car sharing" programs (similar to Zipcar in the US). Taking a taxi is another option.


11

I've done this several times, renting a flat in Berlin for some weeks up to about a month. Over the years, my platforms of choice have been wg-gesucht.de and zwischenmiete.de. The first one of those had more offers than the second one when I last used it in December 2012. A lot of offers were available on both platforms. On these platforms you find ...


11

Like others have said, Checkpoint Charlie is the main tourist point to go. What I'd suggest is looking at the museum (near the US side of the 'border'). There's a piece of the wall standing there, although I suspect it's been moved from its original location, as you'll see when you continue. From Checkpoint Charlie, walk towards the 'border crossing', ...


11

I don't recall any peculiar rule. You are supposed to walk on the sidewalk and to cross streets only when the pedestrian sign is green (unlike the UK, if that's where you come from). You can receive a small fine for failing to do so. It's not as bad as Amsterdam but do beware of bike lanes and treat them like streets (look right and left before crossing, ...


10

Being used to German ample vacation times, 5 days seems awfully short to really see much along such a long route, and I'd therefore avoid going the extra distance to the Alps, unless you require your hikes to include spectacular alpine vistas - but if you're staying in Munich for a while, that's a different story. The most direct route from Berlin to Munich ...


10

The cheapest way is obviously to hitchhike, especially if time is not an issue. You can check out Hitchwiki for suggestions on how to do that. To fly might be cheap, but remember that the cheap airlines (RyanAir, for example) often take you to airports well outside the city, and then you have to get a bus/train in. Also, asking which is the cheapest is ...


10

Ok, JoErNanO explained the legal part, now as German I am able to explain the unofficial part. It has nothing to do with a fine. You are disobeying openly a rule while others are present. The amount of consistency is variable, people from Northrhine-Westphalia are more prudent to ignore lights than those from Bavaria. If noone is present, no cars at night ...


9

If you go to the website of the Russian embassy in Germany, you can find (although a bit hidden) a page where they state that the consular department started since 8. January 2013 to process digital visa applications coming from Consulate Portal of Russian Foreign Affairs Ministry. So if you go to that site you should be able to get your Visa Otherwise, ...


9

My favourite communist architecture in Berlin is definitely the Frankfurter Tor and the rest of the "Stalinallee ensemble". Frankfurter Tor: Thanks to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons Stalinallee / Karl-Marx-Allee: Thanks to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons Building on Stalinallee / Karl-Marx-Allee: My own photo I'm not sure if this is exactly what you ...


9

If you have got luck you can find a cheap ticket for buses (but not direct). For example www.polskibus.com (available in english). There is a bus from Berlin to Warsaw (around 9h) and from Warsaw to Krakow (around 4h30). But sometimes this ticket are not cheap and it may be necessary to spend a night in Warsaw.


9

Why?? I don't know, probably they don't have the information about all kind of public transport. So it's better to use fahrinfo-berlin.de Here is an exaple for this route: EDIT: Google maps shows also U-Bahns, Trams and Buses (but still only in Berlin and Brandenburg(VBB))


9

There is the Checkpoint Charlie Mauer Museum. If you are going to visit, you must visit East Side Gallery - the rather long fragment of Berlin Wall, that is painted with artistic graffiti. This is an endangered place - this year there were plans to destroy it, followed by large protests.


9

For letters (but not always parcels), you can also use general delivery. In Germany, it's called “Postlagernd”. You don't need to do any paperwork beforehand but you need to check that a given post office offers this service and find the correct postal code using this website. You will then have the person sending you mail use the following address: [Your ...


9

Andra is right. It's possible, but the nearest vicinity of the airport is rather dull. Better take a bus for some stops. If you want to walk the whole distance, maybe head a bit east first, then south. As soon as you reach Moabit (around Beusselstr station) the walk is becoming more interesting.


9

Nationwide strikes have become more common in the last couple of years but they seldom last that long. Last week's strike was the last one in a series but with 8 days it was the longest in many years. Also, I have travelled during strikes. It's a bit more difficult because you have to be prepared for delays, crowded trains, and impromptu announcements in ...


8

One amazing Soviet structure is the World War II memorial in Treptower Park, in the southeast of Berlin. (There are several Soviet war memorials commemorating WW2; another is in the Tiergarten. I haven't seen that one so have no idea what's it's like, but the Treptower one seems to be more well-known / renowned, in my experience.) Many people seem to like ...


8

I don't think you can validate the ticket on the train itself. The German page for Kurzstrecken-Tickets states: "Kurzstreckenfahrscheine that need to be validated have to be validated at the beginning of the journey" Even though BVG has English pages there doesn't seem to be an equivalent for that page in English. If this is too vague, you can validate ...



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