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18

You can certainly rent a car in Basel and drive around. I have driven with my European license in the States without any problem, so I asume you can drive in Europe as if you are in the US. There are certain differences in trafic rules, but if you drive carefully you'll be okay. Having said that, I would recommend the public transport system in Basel. When ...


9

foodguide.ch looks fairly reasonable to me (ratings seem to agree with my impression). Comments by owners and patrons are in German for Basel, though.


7

There is a cable-car going up to Niesen Mountain. As the Wikipedia article says, it is one of the longest cable-cars in Europe. An overview about the prices is available on the official homepage. You should look for the station at the top of the mountain which is called Nielsen Kulm. The price is around 53 CHF for a return ticket if you don't have any ...


7

You can easily fly to Zurich. The connections from Brussels to Zurich are way better than the connections from Brussels to Basel. And from Zurich you're in less than a hour in Basel when you take the train. The prices for that train travel start around 15 Swiss franks. The SBB (Swiss national train carrier) has an understandable website. I found flights for ...


5

Generally speaking it is no problem to rent a car at Basel airport. As you can see on the homepage of the airport, you can rent car from at least 6 major and worldwide-known companies. It isn't a problem to drive a car with your US license, you should just provide a credit card as usual in the whole word. The price really depends on various factors, as ...


5

For the Greater Zurich Area I'd recommend Z├╝ritipp, a collection of all reviews by Zurich's largest newspaper.


5

An interesting online resource for "insider tips" in Switzerland is www.ronorp.ch. This site offers a daily newsletter that sends you the latest information about a chosen city. First it was only available for Zurich, but now it is available for all big Swiss cities and also some foreign cities (e.g. London). The newsletter contains information about events, ...


5

Generally speaking the borders between Switzerland and its neighboring countries Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, France and Italy are open for every one. Obviously, you need an appropriate visa, but if that is okay there is nothing that restrains you from crossing any border. For example with a Schengen visa you can cross every border between Switzerland ...


4

No first hand experience, but some info based on online sources: Looking at the airport website, you'd probably be taking bus 50 to Basel, which is operated by BVB (Basel's public transport company). BVB's website has a page on single tickets which only talks about Swiss francs. However, you can also buy the ticket from a machine which accepts euro coins: ...


4

Yes. As a citizen of the United States (I presume), you are in the visa-exempt ("Annex II") category, and will receive a landing permission on arrival that is valid for 90 days throughout the Schengen area, which includes Switzerland, all its neighbors, as well as everything else in the map below (thanks Wikipedia!) that is blue or light blue.


4

I would recommend public transport if you can use that. Switzerland is very wealthy, so has a decent public transport system. (It also means it has very good roads) It is also quite strict with many laws, like speeding. There are numerous other little traffic laws that might catch you out (e.g. turning on a red (is that legal in USA?!?!?)), and then bang, ...


4

Try places.google.com. If you rate restaurants you have already visited, you will get suggestions. The more restaurants you rate, the better the suggestions are.


3

I would look at flying to Zurich and taking a train Bern might be another option but may not be as good. Personally I'd drive but that may be US traveler talking.



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