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27

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


22

According to the producer of the backpacks: “SL“ stands for Slim Line. The entire pack, including the carrying system, is designed with a woman’s physique in mind, but can also be used by anyone with a smaller torso and frame. Features of the SL system: A slightly shorter back length (to accommodate a shorter torso). The SL back system ...


16

Locked means there is a lock on it. For a backpack, if you lock the main compartment and perhaps the secondary one, it should effectively be considered locked. This of course does little to ensure contents of the pack remain in the pack but if you have to do it according to some rules, it should do. To lock it more effectively, place it in a wire metal mesh ...


11

Checked bags may be opened during screening. So the plastic wrap would be removed. You could get a duffel bag with a draw string and put your backpack in it. That would offer more protection then a plastic bag, but it would take some room in your backpack to carry around when your not using the duffel. The TSA's site has some tips.


10

The women's backpacks have different shape to accommodate for the fact that most women have narrower chest, so women's backpacks are generally narrower. Some have shoulder straps shaped differently (S-shape) not to go on top of breasts. Same goes for the shape of the hip belt to accommodate for different shape of men's and women's hips. Also general size ...


10

For Germany: The most inconspicous backpacks are either Jack Wolfskin or Deuter. Seriously, while traveling it is like a lighthouse: Hello, compatriot ! Other popular brands: Arc'teryx, Eagle Creek, Tatonka, The North Face, Thule, Vaude or special brands like PacSafe. But you can always use a cheap No-Name brand: They are also quite often visible. For ...


9

Right, so after thinking about how I'd answer this... Why packing is an individual thing Each to their own. Some friends backpacked South America and New Zealand with day packs. Others take extra luggage and suitcases. It all depends on what you think you'll need. Odds are you'll overestimate - you never need everything. It's easier to pack less, and ...


8

I have a similar pack. When I fly with it, I usually remove the shoulder and hip straps (and put them inside the pack itself). This seems better to protect them from getting damaged. So far it has worked fine. I haven't considered wrapping it in plastic as the airports I use don't provide this option. On my pack, the shoulder and hip straps are made of ...


7

That's a bit risky, since the roll is only held there by pressure. A couple of good whacks to the side, exactly like the ones the bag will receive on the conveyor belts and in the loving arms of the baggage loaders, and it can be knocked out. There's a simple trick for considerably increasing the odds of a rucksack and its attachments making it through in ...


7

Common sense is the best feature you can have when wearing a backpack. Always keep the valuable stuff in the inner big pocket not in the outer small pockets. Pickpockets can simply manipulate the outer small pockets when you are wearing the bag without you feeling a thing. Even if you are using locks on smaller pockets, pickpockets can use a blade to make a ...


5

If you buy a travelling backpack, i.e. a backpack that opens like a suitcase, normally they will have a pocket that you can zip the straps into, which keep them out of the way when checking in. Like this (courtesy from MEC's website):


4

As for France and other European countries (Spain, Poland ...), go to Decathlon. That's the most popular sport store by far, it is reasonably priced and the quality is good, they invest much in R&D. I would recommend actually buying your backpack there than in North America, I bought one at Mountain Equipment Coop, the Canadian equivalent, and for the ...


4

You can also use the (paying) plastic wrapping services that are often found in the airport terminal. This will ensure that all straps, handles, etc do not protrude, and thus will not be caught in the tapis roulant. If TSA/Security or whoever needs to access your bag, they will cut through the wrapping and should then replace it with their own heavy-duty ...


4

Find a pack of appropriate size. Find other things from the store and stuff every compartment to the max. While packing everything you'll need. Put it on and walk around. Climb some stairs or step onto a bench/chair. Is it comfortable? Can you easily access some compartments while wearing it? Can you use the zippers while wearing gloves? Does it inhibit ...


4

The backpack I have has a pocket at the bottom with a cover that zips over all the straps sort of like what alanh mentions in his answer. That'll only help you if you consider this important enough the next time you buy a backpack, though. Apart from that, I've also got a combined rain cover and transit bag. Something like this: ...


3

If you don't mind hauling it around at the other end (or discarding and looking for another when its time to go home) maybe a cardboard or plastic tube of the type used for transporting blueprints and art (any art store should carry the type shown below). Some of them might be useful transporting other stuff with a backpack so it wouldn't be totally wasted. ...


3

First, establish the use for the backpack. Will you be wearing it all day, in all kinds of weather, while walking 8 or 12 hours through nature? Or will you be putting it in the luggage compartment of buses or trains? Will you be using it in a city where you need to worry about pickpockets or bag-slicers? Does it matter that it fits the rules for carryon ...


3

I think the choice of luggage very much depends on the type of trip you are planning to do. If you are doing standard backpacking trip, when you need to carry your stuff mainly for short distances from a hotel to a bus or train, then it makes sense to have a bigger backpack with more clothes/stuff to make your journey more comfortable, and have some spare ...


2

The other thing I've seen some bags come with is handy nylon+velcro organisers for straps. Kind of hard to describe, but here goes: Short length of strap-style nylon, about 4-6 inches long. Velcro on each end Place horizontally across the long dangly end of your strap after tightening all the way/clipping where possible Wrap the dangly end around it, ...


2

It depends. There are guys who have only 2 pair of socks (change if one get wet, one on feet, one is drying), 2 T-Shirts etc. On 1-week trip it can work, and it can, for sure, get you free compartment in the train, as no one will want to sit near you... If you don't go so extreme, I can't honestly imagine packing for a few weeks in 55l backpack. There are ...


2

I think I would start with going to a big and respectable bike shop and ask there. There seem to be quite a selection of backpacks especially designed for bikers, you can google for it to get an idea. Then you can ask specifically what is different in these special bike backpacks, etc. If you want to carry your laptop in the backpack, I strongly recommend ...


2

Here is a basic premise that was told to me before I went travelling that proved good to keep in mind: If somebody really wants to get into your bag, you're not going to be able to stop them. What you can do, however, is discourage them. Assuming you're not leaving your bag out in the road unattended for several hours, all you have to do is be ...


2

Not tried, but it strikes me you could use a baby stroller bag like this one. They're meant for use at carry-on/gate check, but I reckon there'd be no problem checking them in. They also fold down quite small so you'd not waste too much space while you're backpacking.


2

Personally I would package them tightly together using generous amounts of bubble-wrap and heavy-duty scotch tape. The more bubble-wrap the better. This way the sharp edges of the poles will be safely contained, and the package together will be bulky enough as to reduce the chances of damaging it (bending the poles) if weight is applied on it.


1

You can actually dismantle many of the telescoping poles and when you do, they are even shorter than when telescoped up. Be sure to try this at the shop (or at home) before you travel so that you know what to expect (some have fiddly bits that come out when you unscrew them).


1

Have you considered getting a pannier rather than using a back pack? I cycle to work with a change of clothes and a laptop as well as all my cycling maintenance gear in my pannier and it's great. You also avoid arriving at your destination with a sweaty back. Also you are probably better off asking questions like this on the Bicycles Stack Exchange site.



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