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0

Many countries, and I assume that the Netherlands is among them, has an order of priority for conflicting signs in their traffic laws. When I learned to drive (not in the Netherlands though), we were tought about three categories, here listed in the order of increasing priority: Road markings and fixed signs Traffic lights and variable signs Orders from ...


8

When it's open, you're allowed to cross the line. Source (Dutch). I had never actually heard that before, so I assume everybody else reasons the same way I did: it's an open lane, you're obviously supposed to use it as a perfectly normal lane, so the fact that it can only be reached by crossing an uncrossable line must be a visual illusion that can be ...


5

Yes you can. Because a Canadian license permits you to drive manual transmission cars back home, it's taken as permission to drive one abroad. Since there isn't a specific 'manual transmission' license there is no other approach that could be taken. I have rented manual cars in Britain many times on an Ontario license.


1

You read correctly. A UK driving license differentiates between automatic and manual, and those with automatic licenses are not allowed to drive manuals. I'm not sure about the conditions of Canadian licenses in the UK, however if you acquire an international driving permit then this distinction doesn't apply no matter which country you are from. Also ...


2

To add to the other answers: It is a good idea to create a paper contract (possibly even with a lawyer present) with the other party to clarify that the person who signed the contract with the rental company will be reimbursed by the non-signee for any monetary costs following from an action or inaction from the non-signee while he is using using the car. ...


5

Regarding the Risks Yes I think it could be possible for you to find someone willing to drive your car back. As MarkMayo suggested there are a few options out there including organised services, as well as other travellers' forums (LonelyPlanet, etc). In the case of an organised service such as Transfercar I would assume they have all the legalese figured ...


16

Sort of. It's simpler than that, and potentially far cheaper. You just need to be flexible. Services like Transfercar allow you to return cars for free, essentially. The idea is that generally more people travel in a particular direction when renting - the flow is not even. In New Zealand, for example, many renters get a car in Auckland (most common ...


0

because of sanctions international companies usually will even prohibit the access to their free services for users located in Iran (for example Google code) and because of their nature, insurance companies will be very happy to deny to cover you in Iran, and even if they want to cover you they can't because at this time most foreign companies(especially ...


1

I agree with all the other answers. Bottom line: the best way to tour an entire country is by Road. Depending on the type of journey you are planning there are various combinations of means of transportation you could use. For example, if you plan to stay for a long period in a region, say Normandy, and then think of moving all the way across the country to ...


5

I haven't done the trip but I know some who did it as part of the Mongol Rally. I checked with them - being Australians, they bought their insurance through 1Cover so they definitely covered the whole trip including driving from Europe (London) through to Iran and beyond. The Rally itself suggests Campbell Irvine, which suggests they will also cover that ...


0

The simple answer is of course, obviously, get a car. France is - well - France. You want to see every little village, tour around and see everything. So, you'll be "touring" - get a car. French trains are fantastic for TRAVEL - so, you're in Lyon and you need to go to Paris for some reason; you're in Zurich and you need to go to Barcelona for some reason. ...


1

I would ask on one of the motorhome forms, e.g. http://www.nzmotorhome.co.nz/NZMotorhome/index.html


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In addition to the usual maps.google, an alternative is http://livetraffic.tomtom.com. On the left, you can enter the time you are leaving and it figures out when you'll arrive, or enter the time you want to arrive and it figures out when you should leave. It is based on many different data points, so it is pretty accurate. It's a good alternative to ...



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