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3

I don't believe there are any true park and ride schemes in the London area (park for free and pay just your transport costs). London is just too big for that. However this website is a good tool for those unsure of what parking options there are at London transport stations outside of the centre. It searches from which direction you will be coming from to ...


1

Easy to find car park areas with good public transport into the city are the airport areas. All of them have the official as well as alternative parking areas. Heathrow is on your way to London, Gatwick on your way around towards Dover, Luton and Stanstead can be useful if you plan to use the ferries at Harwich. You can also look in booking a hotel out of ...


1

If parking offsite is still too pricey for long term trip, you might want to try renting a car one-way and doing it to and from the airport. I did this on a recent trip flying out of another region and it saved me a ton of money. If you don't like that idea then there are some other good suggestions for ways to save money on parking on this O'Hare parking ...


5

No additional paperwork is required, other than your normal car paperwork (tag, registration, insurance). You can take pictures, but before handing over the car to the delivery agent they will do a walk around to inspect the condition of the vehicle. You should also make sure you have insurance for the move (this is not the same as your normal liability ...


5

1: As long as you have tags, registration and insurance, there should be no other paperwork required. 2: Always a good idea, as proof of condition before shipping. 3: Once you accept the car and drive it off the delivery yard, they are absolved of claims for damage that you discover later. Always good to do a walk around before signing the delivery ...


1

The answers posted are in line with my experience. I recently traveled in a 2014 Audi A6 3.0 TDI on a trip to pick up my daughter at college. Round trip was about 800 miles. On the roof was a Rhino Rack with oval shaped cross beams and on the rack was a mountain bike and Yakima box filled with items such as duffle bags, books, etc. Inside the car were ...


3

Ask to speak with the manager, show your receipt, ask them to check the cameras, most likely the credit is still in their computer system.


6

Buying a car is not the issue, really, it is getting it registered in your name. I am not aware of any countries where you can do that. I am aware of two alternatives though. In this answer I will focus on the Dutch side of these things as I am most familiar with them. Note that I am not a lawyer and I may be missing factors. Option 1: registering as a ...


3

I bought a car a week after arriving in the country. I was on a WH visa, but at the moment of purchase/registration the visa status was never mentioned/asked/inquired. I bought my car in a fair, so I can't be sure what the process is with a car dealer. If you decide to buy, check the car fairs in Auckland and trademe for good deals. Be sure to have your ...


1

Yes, I understand this is common in NZ. More information on the process is available from the NZ Transport Agency (a governmentt department) here: https://www.nzta.govt.nz/vehicles/buying-and-selling-a-vehicle/buying-a-vehicle/ If you have any queries, you should be able to get them answered by NZTA. The auction website trademe.co.nz is commonly used for ...


4

@Aganju's answer is spot but here is another more generic tip: Use viamichelin.com or mappy (as suggested by @Olielo). They do not seem better or worse than Google Maps to find a route, but they also provide an estimate of the tolls that seems pretty accurate (roughly matches my experience, even if I haven't done any systematic comparison). When looking at ...


5

Anything not going through Switzerland will be much cheaper. Switzerland sells annual toll tickets ('Märkli') only, which for a single trip easily beats any other toll. Each countries' toll road agencies will have websites where you can calculate the expected amounts. Note that in some countries, different toll roads are handled by different agencies.


2

Partial answer: I assume you mean a tow hitch normally used for this, instead of an hook for this (because I never heard of bike racks for the latter one). Germany The empty hitch: If it obstructs the view to the license plate, it must be removed. There are no other "hard" rules. However, in an accident, if the hitch causes more damage than it would ...


7

As a life long Oregonian, I can answer. You pull up to the pump, the attendant comes to your window, and you give them your card or cash, and tell them how much you want (usually filled, but I've asked for $20 before, especially when I pay with cash). They fill the tank, give you the receipt, and off you go. It is illegal to pump your own, and you can be ...


3

To drive legally in the UK you need at least "third party" insurance (insurance that covers liability to third parties). Other common types of insurance are "third party, fire and theft" (which covers third party liability, fire damage and theft but does not cover damage to your own car in an accident) and "comprehensive" (which does cover damage to your own ...


2

The following things are normally apply in non-EU European countries (except Kosovo and North-Cyprus). Car insurance: You need an European green card which indicates is valid in Belarus. You can get this from your insurance company. The BY-unit on the card must not be deleted, which indicates that you have a valid European Third-Party Insurance in Belarus. ...



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