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6

The railway structure both in terms of pricing and network is very different in the Alpine countries than in Germany. Broadly speaking in these countries, it's expected that passengers will not plan their journey based on price, but that they'll just show up when they want to travel and take the next appropriate train. While there is some tariff discretion ...


4

While the previous answers justify the reason for it not being there, you can find it. At least for ÖBB trains, head over to the Fahrplan (i.e. the Timetable). These can typically be found around the stations or on the platforms. You will find that every train, even the S-Bahn, has a unique Zug-Nummer (Train Number). Source (Ignore the yellow circle. It ...


3

Sometimes while travelling, tourists need to 'stock up' on a variety of items. Other times one family member may be attending a business meeting and the other family members need to kill a few hours until the family is reunited again. If a place is new and there are language barriers, it is natural for people in some cultures to contemplate what they would ...


3

At Swiss train stations, there are blue information tables on the platforms that tell, for each long distance train, the train number in addition to the exact composition. They're usually located next to the yellow time tables (apologies for potato quality): Of course, you also find the information in paper timetables, the online timetable and mobile ...


3

If you know the type of the train, the departure time and the destination you can uniquely identify a train — I don't know of a single case where two trains to the same destination via different routes depart at the same time. In those cases, the platform is always shown in electronic journey planners (and often on your ticket). If the scheduled platform is ...



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