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41

Yes, for every problem with the police, you can insist to do it at the station. But I wouldn't choose this as first option automatically. Normally trivial things like showing your ID might extend to several hours (with a bit of bad luck). Getting a car to get you to the next station, waiting there if something is more important, doing the full course of ...


21

I notice in the comments that you're looking for somewhere to sit and work. Apparently, Vienna has a very high concentration of co-working spaces purpose-designed for the sort of thing you're looking to do. From this article: Move over coffee shops! The Viennese have found a better place to work, connect, and stay warm: Austria may be small, but ...


20

Google reverse image search says that it might be Feldkirch, Vorarlberg. Indeed the church and the first house in the foreground (the one with the two windows underneath the straight part of the roof) seem to be the ones in the picture below from Wikipedia: File:Feldkirch3.jpg, Wikimedia Commons, CC by SA 3.0 Google maps places it here. By precise ...


17

The purpose of the Schengen Treaty is to let EU/EEA citizens pass internal EU borders without having to wait in line to have their papers checked. This greatly simplifies cross-border travel and commerce since there are no delays. Earlier treaties allowed EU citizens to pass those borders without visa or passports, just with their national ID cards. Those ...


14

The sign "dekoriert" in Germany and also in Switzerland means that there will be Fasnacht/Fasching/Karneval decoration in the venue, mostly in Restaurants and Bars. Only decoration - nothing else implied. You will find those signs on the most boring and conservative countryside family restaurants just as well as downtown bars that open at 23:00 and close at ...


14

Directly after the train station in Zurich there will be nothing to see. You will drive through a tunnel for a quarter of hour and when you will see the daylight again, you are already at the lake Zurich. The train line follows more or less directly the shoreline, and if the weather is nice it can be interesting to observe the people there sunbathing and the ...


13

Don't worry, you will be able to communicate in Hochdeutsch. One thing you should know is that the German you will hear and read in Austria is not the German you may hear in Hannover. There are some particularities (EN, DE). However, if you have a good command of German this won't be a problem. Moreover, the Austrians when speaking have a typical accent ...


12

There are no objections to taking the train from Vienna airport to Brno. However, in your precise case, the bus has two advantages. The bus is direct. You get in the bus at the airport and get out off the bus in Brno. No need to change. With the train you have to change at least once, sometimes even twice or three times. You have to carry your luggage ...


11

You can search for stores on the Starbucks site, here are the results for Vienna, Austria. There are many stores and many are near U-Bahn stations and/or tram and bus stops. For example this store is right beside Wien Mitte Station and also even closer to a local tram stop, here's a Google Maps shot: and a close up showing the tram stop: But there ...


10

You might not have a seat. In European trains, the seat reservation is independent from the train pass. Some trains require a seat reservation (TGVs in France) but not all. In German countries (at least Germany and Austria) it is possible to buy a train ticket and then a seat ticket. You can also buy it anytime (as long as there are seats left) and the ...


10

Renting Winter-Equipped Cars in Italy I think it is actually possible to rent a car, equipped for winter road travel, in Italy. Indeed, Hertz agrees with me: To help you enjoy safer, more reliable and more comfortable journeys, we offer a range of winter driving accessories: Winter tyres - for significantly improved handling and stopping ...


10

The UK requires visas of refugee travel document holders, unless the country which issued the travel document is also a signatory of the 1959 European Agreement on the Abolition of Visas for Refugees. Visa-free entry is limited to 3 months instead of 6 months under this extremely little-known scheme. Austria is not a signatory, so this does not apply to you ...


9

In my opinion, 8 days are fine to visit Vienna, Salzburg and Hallstatt, but you'll have to speed up a bit to visit the main attractions. I recommend you this route: Vienna-Salzburg-Hallstatt. Spend at least 3 days in Vienna. This city has one of the biggest cultural offers so, even a 3 days time visit won't be enough. Visiting "the Ring", Vienna's city ...


9

YES AND NO. Yes - the SIM card will work in Austria, but NO, you cannot use your normal flatrate. Aldi talk also offers EU Internet Paket 60 but it has only 60MB for 1 week and costs 4.99 EUR and EU Sprach Paket 60 which has 60 Minutes for 1 week and costs also 4.99 EUR.


9

It's feldkirch. I live near there. (It's the view from the schattenburg, the blue "hypo" sign in both pictures is the same sign)


9

Every capital city I have ever been, and many smaller cities and towns, have shops selling coins, and those mostly also do bank notes of the country. In German, for Vienna and Germany, you google on 'Münze' or of course 'shops Coins or Numismatics' (leave off the last few letters and google will fill it out for you. I can not find the Slovak word as fast, ...


8

There are a lot of different questions in here. I tried to answer at least some of them: 1) Apart from a fully functioning car I would recommend to take a GPS navigation device with you. Check if the maps are up-to-date. Additionally, you should inform yourself, if you need any additional gear if you want to travel through foreign countries. If I remember ...


8

If you're willing to drive 2.5 hours from Munich you can reach some of the famous ski resorts in Austria. A good starting point to find some resorts is this website, that maps a lot of them to a map. You're particularly interested in those on the left side of Austria. This site is very similar, but maybe even easier to understand, since here Munich is also ...


8

Generally, Austrian trains are quite punctual and on time. However, two minutes to change a train is really tight, and 4 minutes isn't really better. The train station in Schwarzach-St.Veit is quite small and this will enhance your chance that you will catch the train. On the other hand, the train station in Salzburg is quite big, so if you're unlucky, there ...


8

The answer is indeed no; no visa or ESTA of any kind needed for a visit of 90 days or less. Here's what the US State Department (Bureau of Consular Affairs) has to say: ENTRY / EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR U.S. CITIZENS: Austria is a party to the Schengen Agreement. As such, U.S. citizens may enter Austria for up to 90 days in any 180-day period for ...


8

06:00 to 18:00 at most on Saturdays, not opened at all on Sundays. There are exceptions for stores in airports and train stations. Here's a list of branches with special opening hours for Billa, a large supermarket chain.


8

In Germany, there are two options that you might use: A Reisemobil-Stellplatz is an officially designated area where you can spend the night in your vehicle, theoretically it's inteded only for RVs. However, many of them also allow cars and I doubt you'd be turned away with a car that you actually intend to sleep on. There are websites such as this and ...


8

The western half of what you're looking at would fall well within the range usually referred to as Allgäu - here is a 'map' of the outlines of that region as used in today's tourism industry, covering both Germany and Austria although originally Allgäu was a part of the German Oberschwaben, see here. The Austrian areas are part of (Nord)Tirol - a map with ...


7

In Vienna they speak Viennese, which is their city dialect of standard German (Hochdeutsch). However they have no problem in speaking or communicating with you in Hochdeutsch. You will be perfectly fine . In addition most young Austrians speak English, so if the German were to play up (although highly unlikely) you can always communicate in English.


7

Well, yes. Most hostels have guest kitchens, and indeed when I stayed in Vienna at one of the Wombat chain hostels, it had both a bar with food and drink, and a guest kitchen for people to prepare their own meals. As a comment on the question said, it's very rare that hostels don't have kitchens for guests to use. They may be small, they may be ...


7

Accord to the Salzburger Verkehrsverbund, a single ticket from Salzburg to Bad Ischl costs 10.10 EUR: You can indeed buy the ticket from the driver. The Austrian Federal Railways quote a fare of 4.10 EUR for a single 2nd class ticket from Bad Ischl to Hallstatt:


7

It does not cover all the regular busses in the country but postbus.at is the main operator and does operate busses you could use. Unfortunately, it's not a part of the national train company (ÖBB) and the website therefore also includes trains, which is why busses do not show up in the search results for this particular journey… rome2rio is another site ...


7

The "Member state of first entry" will be Austria because that's where you will pass through immigration.


7

I don't know why you think it's generally 26 in Europe. In fact, with a normal ticket (Austria, train only, not international, no week/month card etc., no other discounts), the adult price is for age 15 and above. You can check this with Michael Borgwardt's link too, for any two stations within Austria. At least in Germany it's 15 too, so two countries out ...


6

The information you're looking for is which mountain passes are open/closed. Here's a site (in German) detailing the situation in Austria, as well as Germany, France, Italy, Switzerland and Slovenia. Purple/red means that the passes are closed.



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