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1

The UK youth mobility visa does not grant you any extra rights outside of the UK. As an Australian citizen, you can however travel to all EU countries for at most 90 days without visa anyway (i.e. even without the UK youth mobility visa). Beware, in the Schengen area (i.e. most of the European Union), it's 90 days per 180-day period in the whole area, not 90 ...


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I'm assuming your partner's British passport is because he has UK citizenship (in addition to Australian). As an Australian citizen you don't need a visa to enter most European countries for stays up to 90 days per rolling 180 day period, but you will need a residence permit if you stay in, say, the Schengen area beyond that limit. (Which sounds likely to ...


0

As a native-born American English speaker, I find that I have to 'tune' my hearing if I haven't heard a particular accent before or not heard it for a while. Let's just say that the first time I saw an episode of Taggart (Glaswegian accents), I understood almost nothing. Even after watching multiple seasons, there are still some words that I can't make out ...


1

Your ESTA did not expire 90 days after your first trip to the US. This is not how it works, and probably is why you are confused. The ESTA is good for two years and multiple entries. Approved ESTA applications are valid for a period of two years, or until the passport expires, whichever comes first, and multiple trips to the United States without the ...


2

For starters with a one way ticket, you will need to prove you are leaving Thailand within the time limits of your visa or entry stamp BEFORE they will let you on the airplane. And claiming you are buying a car to drive yourself out of the country will not satisfy the requirement. You will need to either get a long stay visa or buy a throw away air ticket ...


2

Australian citizens do not need a visa for short visits to the Schengen area (including Germany), whether for business, tourism or any other purpose. However, you cannot work in Germany without a specific authorization. I am not sure of the exact legal definitions but things like meeting clients, attending a trade-show, etc. are typically business ...


2

The line between work and business can be blurry. You are allowed in for business, but not for work. Say you are in a retail store, you operate the cash register, and for each hour you spend in the store, the store (company) gives you (a human) $8 US less some deductions. Clearly, you're working. Say you run a consulting company and some of your staff will ...


4

Signing a passport is a requirement for each new passport. As much as anything else your signature acknowledges that you have read its terms and conditions, and that you took possession of it. There is no requirement that signatures remain consistent throughout a person's life time. In your specific case, there would be thousands of applicants in a ...



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