New answers tagged

2

Sure. If you want to go to the US, and the trip isn't for an E-3 purpose, but does qualify you as a visitor for business or pleasure, you can enter on the VWP or a B-1/B-2 visa. I'm not sure what would disqualify you from traveling as an E-3 but not as a B or VWP visitor, but I imagine there might be reasons such relating to your US employment, or perhaps ...


3

It does not seem so. At least not related to the free trade agreement. It likely depends on politics and those are hardly forecastable. First of all, the 10-year visa for Chinese citizens you refer to were not agreed upon in ChAFTA, the free trade agreement you mention. You can find the text of that here. Annex 10-A has the commitments of Australia "on the ...


2

Yes, the passport number will change. The reason that airlines ask for passport information when booking flights is so that the airline can satisfy any pre-clearance requirements by immigration authorities at the destination. Typically, the information needs to be transmitted to the destination country authorities a certain number of hours or days before ...


4

I am American. Things may be different in Australia but probably not. When I renewed my passport, the new passport had a different number. However, I did not lose my old passport. Any visa in it are still valid. I can still use my old passport for many purposes. Book your flight with your old passport. Bring both passports to the airport. There will ...


5

As others have said, your new passport will almost certainly have a new number, and it is this number which you should record on your booking, so that it matches when you get to the airport. However, note that you generally don't have to provide a passport number at time of booking, only before check in, because the airlines / travel agents know that you ...


7

YES I'm an Australian citizen and have had five passports, perhaps six, beginning in 1989. Each time I've renewed my passport over the years the new passport has had a number different to the old one.


46

All biometric passports have serial numbers that change when issued. Per this notice from the Singaporean government, this is an ICAO requirement: https://www.ica.gov.sg/news_details.aspx?nid=12246 And since virtually all passports are now biometric, even those countries (like Singapore) that did not previously change numbers do so now. Update: Here's ...


12

Yes the passport number changes upon renewal. The new passport will have it's own unique identifier i.e. its own passport number. This is a common practice. The old passport number will be invalidated and will appear as such when checked by border officers if you try to use it to travel. As an authoritative reference, the British embassy in Bern confirms ...


6

Yes, it will change. A quick google search reveals it certainly does so for all major English-speaking nations. I believe this to be true as a general matter of fact, however I can not find an authoritative reference at the moment. However, Wikipedia says: A standard passport booklet format includes the cover, [...]. Passports have numerical or ...


9

Yes, your passport number will change. I have looked at my old and new passports (2 UK ones and 3 Australian ones) and the numbers are different for every renewal/replacement. Additionally for me, I have had different issuing offices for each one, so that may be the reason mine have changed.


36

I called the Australian Passport Office, as I couldn't find this information anywhere on their website. They confirmed that passport numbers do indeed change both at a renewal and also at a passport reissue due to name change. Obviously this only applies for Australian passports; I'm unaware of whether this is a general rule for other countries.



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