New answers tagged

1

Probably yes, but ... I put in my visa application today. I ticked the box for multiple-entry 12 month visa. I had a printout for a flight into Guangzhou and out again just under two months later. I also had a printout for one week of accommodation in Guangzhou. In fact I was told I must have these things the first time I went to the Chinese visa office ...


2

I've just sent my soon to expire UK passport via Australia post to the UK PA in Liverpool, UK. The requirements are unclear- stating no photocopies- but colour copies of every page of the non-UK passport are acceptable. I photographed every page and then collated all 37+ pages onto 4 pages before pdf and printing. Fingers crossed that is acceptable, I'll ...


6

It used to be that you were required to physically send them the other passport(s) as well; I believe the full colour copy requirement is intended to be less onerous than having to send them the passport which you may have been hoping to use for travel while waiting for the UK one to get back to you. It does appear to be a requirement in the latest official ...


2

One way to work around this problem is to purchase a fully refundable onward ticket before you depart. You can show this to the immigration officer if they ask for your onward travel plans. After you arrive, you can then exchange the fully refundable ticket for a cheaper one. Note that depending on the country and airline, you may not be allowed to simply ...


6

Wow I got a reply from the consular section of the Russian Embassy to Cambodia already! For all types of visa for Australian citizens: Single Entry Visa 100 USD 7 business days processing 200 USD 3 business days processing Double Entry Visa 200 USD 7 business days processing 335 USD 3 business days processing Multiple Entry ...


4

For all practical purposes, the Mongolian tögrög is a closed currency, meaning you can't buy it outside of Mongolia. I'm not quite certain why this is so, but probably because it seems to be illegal to take more tögrög out of the country than you bring in, so there's no easy way for an overseas bank to gain a supply of tögrög to sell to you. (But don't ...


2

The only other recommendation I have is to delete (uninstall/remove) any banking related apps on the phone before your travel, for 3 reasons: It is not too difficult to retrieve logs generated by apps installed on a phone and I wouldn't completely rely on the banks that they have secured their apps in all possible ways You are likely to access internet via ...


3

Reciprocal agreements will normally cover the actual medical care but there can be other expenses involved with getting sick/injured while abroad which won't be covered. Accomodation costs can be significant if the emergency delays your travel home. If you are hospitalised on a longer-term basis then the cost of transport home in the injured state can be ...


7

In general the point of the medical component of travel insurance is to deal with acute treatement abroad and then if nessacery to transport you back home (flying someone home on a stretcher is not cheap). Accidents don't just happen when travelling, so if you feel the need for insurance against disablity caused by accidents then you should probablly look ...


6

Travel insurances are "one offs" for special occasions and hence people buy them rarely, for a limited amount of time and don't research them very well. The insurance industry often takes advantage of this and many policies are insanely complicated with lots and lots of exclusions and limitation to coverage. If you want to find out whether a specific ...


6

Everyone has given good advice about the phone and that it will almost undoubtedly be safe if you put a password on it (rather than a short PIN). The only issue that I see is to ensure that access to your email service is encrypted. Almost all are these days, so it's only a concern if you access mail without using SSL. You will see this under Advanced ...


8

Most people that target identify theft are not looking at your cellular phone; they are looking at things that can be used to impersonate you - so your id card, passport, etc. People stealing phones are looking at reselling them for a quick buck. So, if you put a passcode on your phone, it makes it less of a target for being sold on. iPhones in particular ...


8

Unless you need that specific device, I would get a throw-away device to carry in questionable situations. You can get decent Android devices for under $100 US.


19

None, as long as you lock your phone with a password. It took the FBI several weeks of efforts to crack an iPhone belonging to the San Bernardino mass shooter, so a random low-level thief won't have the skills or tools to access your encrypted information. I would worry more about information stolen on your laptop, although that also can be mitigated by ...


36

If you have a sufficiently modern iPhone (eg. anything that runs iOS 9 would be fine), then enable a passcode, set "Require Passcode" to "Immediately" (so you have to enter it every time you open the phone) or something short. The phone's memory is encrypted using a key derived from the passcode. No passcode, no personally identifiable data. If you do this, ...


2

If you are no longer a national of India then your old visa is no longer valid. It is possible to use a valid visa in an expired passport, but the visa indicates that you are an Indian national, so your loss of Indian nationality causes the visa to be invalid. When you travel to the US, you should do so as an Australian, either by applying for a new B1/B2 ...


4

You probably have noticed that India does not recognize dual-citizenship so your Indian passport is no longer valid (as far as India is concerned) and should be given back to the nearest Indian mission. You are facing - penalties otherwise. Also since you have an Overseas Citizenship of India card, India is aware that you acquired another citizenship and in ...



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