Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

I'm sorry, but you've screwed yourself well and proper here. Not only have you been refused entry three times in a row, which means that any future visa applications will be treated with extreme prejudice, but you've now illegally entered the United Kingdom as well. To expand on that last bit, just because there are no border controls between Ireland and ...


18

Here's what ended up happening- I flew into Glasgow from Dublin with no problems, once there I caught a bus down to London. Also with no issues. I spent a while there, saw the sights and caught up with old friends. Just like I stated I would. Then after much contemplation decided to take the leap and continue with my return trip to Iceland, consequences ...


15

I occasionally talk to people from various parts of Australia. I find that there are different thicknesses in Australian accent. The thicker the accent, or the faster they talk, the harder time I may have understanding them. This applies to folks from the UK too. Different accents or speaking speeds can make it hard for me to understand. This also applies ...


8

There is no international authority that sets any such limit, nor one which would have the ability to enforce it. But for most people, it is not practical to maintain too many multiple nationalities. Most countries frown upon multiple citizenships, and place some restrictions on it, at least on paper. Some countries, like Austria, only allow dual ...


7

Sounds dodgy, frankly. As far as I know, the border control system is not connected to PNC (police system where "wanted" flags are set for people, among other things) directly. That said, UK is one of the countries requiring API (advanced passenger info) from airlines, therefore the airline that you are flying with will pass your details (specifically, ...


5

The first thing a traveller in trouble should do is contacting their embassy/consulate. As you are in Glasgow now, the next Consulate is in Edinburgh: Mitchell House 5 Mitchell Street Edinburgh EH6 7BD Tel: +44 131 538 0582 Unfortunately it is an Honorary Consul (meaning that he isn't really paid for his job and has very limited rights, so do not expect ...


5

There is no limit, in theory or practice. This thread on Flyertalk mentions several people with five citizenships, posits a case where a child born to a couple with three citizenships each would easily get 7, and goes on to speculate that with the right sets of parents it would be possible to acquire more than 9 at birth plus any more you'd care to ...


4

Signing a passport is a requirement for each new passport. As much as anything else your signature acknowledges that you have read its terms and conditions, and that you took possession of it. There is no requirement that signatures remain consistent throughout a person's life time. In your specific case, there would be thousands of applicants in a ...


3

I'm assuming your partner's British passport is because he has UK citizenship (in addition to Australian). As an Australian citizen you don't need a visa to enter most European countries for stays up to 90 days per rolling 180 day period, but you will need a residence permit if you stay in, say, the Schengen area beyond that limit. (Which sounds likely to ...


3

What you're asking about is called a visa run. Staying on back-to-back tourist visas is frowned on by many countries, and Immigration will probably start wondering if you're working illegally sooner or later, but anecdotal evidence says South Korea is not particularly picky and it's possible to stay for years this way. Your mileage may vary. However, it ...


2

Australian Citizens do NOT require a visa if they are visiting South Korea for the purposes of Tourism for stays up to 90 days. (Although as of about 10 years ago one IS required for business visits). The only documentation required will be proof of an onward journey out of South Korea (eg, a return plane ticket). You can confirm this on the South Korean ...


2

The passports in Sweden are only 350kr, that equates to approximately 60 AUD. Even with the 5 year validity coming into question, doubling the cost it is still half the price. I couldn't believe how cheap the Swedish passports were when I checked - having recently paid for a new Australian one, I feel somewhat ripped off!


2

I am a romanian citizen living in Germany for five years. I kept contact with my friends in Romania and I travel there every year. The Australian citizens do not require a visa to enter Romania for a period up to 90 days. Therefore, if I were you, I would travel to Romania and apply for long stay visa from inside the country (conditions and required ...


2

Exiting Schengen and reentering does not seem to be a requirement to make your stay valid. As other answers show it, it is possible to spend up to 90 days inside the Schengen area for tourism purpose even if you had a long-stay visa before. This is only experience and is not an authoritative source, but a friend (who does not need a visa for short stay) ...


2

Understanding unfamiliar accents can be very difficult. Most Americans have never talked to someone with an Australian accent. Personally, I've gotten a lot better at understanding Australian accents due to some Australian friends and a few trips there, but the first time I heard two Australians talking to each other (I was 21 and traveling in Europe) I ...


2

You could look into a B1/B2 visa, which can be for tourist purposes, up to a period of six months. There is quite a bit of information to read on qualifications, etc but with the right documentation and evidence of funds, tickets etc, you could still do it.


2

I've heard of others managing this, and it really can come down to the immigration officer, their questions and their belief of the answers you give to said questions. You're going to want to provide documentation and lots of it. Proof of flight out of the US in two week's time. Proof of your job back home (or study) that you're returning to. Proof of ...


2

For starters with a one way ticket, you will need to prove you are leaving Thailand within the time limits of your visa or entry stamp BEFORE they will let you on the airplane. And claiming you are buying a car to drive yourself out of the country will not satisfy the requirement. You will need to either get a long stay visa or buy a throw away air ticket ...


2

Australian citizens do not need a visa for short visits to the Schengen area (including Germany), whether for business, tourism or any other purpose. However, you cannot work in Germany without a specific authorization. I am not sure of the exact legal definitions but things like meeting clients, attending a trade-show, etc. are typically business ...


2

The line between work and business can be blurry. You are allowed in for business, but not for work. Say you are in a retail store, you operate the cash register, and for each hour you spend in the store, the store (company) gives you (a human) $8 US less some deductions. Clearly, you're working. Say you run a consulting company and some of your staff will ...


1

Brilliantly, they're not clear on the embassy website for Aussies in Canada. However, after some searching it comes down to two options. The express service - priority processing fee applies, means that your urgent/emergency application can be processed and ready for collection or dispatch within 48 hours. The standard service - where it goes via mail ...


1

The UK youth mobility visa does not grant you any extra rights outside of the UK. As an Australian citizen, you can however travel to all EU countries for at most 90 days without visa anyway (i.e. even without the UK youth mobility visa). Beware, in the Schengen area (i.e. most of the European Union), it's 90 days per 180-day period in the whole area, not 90 ...


1

Your ESTA did not expire 90 days after your first trip to the US. This is not how it works, and probably is why you are confused. The ESTA is good for two years and multiple entries. Approved ESTA applications are valid for a period of two years, or until the passport expires, whichever comes first, and multiple trips to the United States without the ...


1

"I am not trying to do a visa run" What you're trying to do is exactly a visa run, you're leaving and reentering the country with the sole intent of bypassing the limits on your visa. Why would US immigration believe that you left the country for another reason than to get out from under the 90 day restriction on your visa, or that you aren't planning to ...


1

It has primarily to do with exposure to different dialects of English. The number of Americans who have traveled abroad is but a small percentage of the population vs Australians, New Zealanders and British. The USA is so large and diversified, that many American travelers have a multitude of things to see and do during their holidays in country without ...


1

In Portugal, being a British citizen gives you some extra rights (you can work without permit, stay there longer than 90 days, use the “EU passport” lane at the border and wouldn't need entry and exit stamps) but you can also enter easily with your Australian passport (no visa needed for a short stay) so nothing to worry about. In the UK, since you are a ...


1

A tourist visa would allow you to enter the UK and stay for up to three months. If you wanted to travel six weeks through the UK with a tourist visa, then stay six months with your student visa, that would seem very dodgy to me and I wouldn't try unless you get some official confirmation that it is fine. (The reason why I think it's dodgy is because you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible