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No, that isn't true. Vietnam doesn't operate a true "Visa on Arrival" system. In additional, all visas for Vietnam have a fee. Some nationalities can enter without a visa, paying nothing and being allowed to remain for 15 days, but neither of your nationalities s are included in that list. Your options for entering Vietnam are: Apply for a visa in advance ...


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They will most likely have to leave the US by the 90th day after their first arrival. In other words, their second stay will most likely be limited to a month and a half. See the State Department's web site (https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visa-waiver-program.html): Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to ...


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No (Unless you are a resident of Malaysia and can proof so). You should apply in Australia or your country of residence. The Malaysia site of VisaForChina has a step-by-step guide and when you complete that you will find a list of requirements: (3) Proof of legal status (applicable for those not applying for the visa in their country of citizenship) ...


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In the comments, some have noted difficulty finding official sources. I've found this, at https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visa-waiver-program.html: Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to the United States under the VWP, you may take a short trip to Canada, Mexico, or a nearby island and generally be ...


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If you do the following: Enter the US Stay for two months Go to Canada Stay for four months Leave North America without setting foot in the US Then you'll be fine with VWP and ETA. The caveat is that the US visit clock does not stop running while you are in Canada, so if you return to the US more than three months after you initially entered, then you ...



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