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3

I have been in Australia as a tourist, traveled east to west with the Indian-Pasific, overland (with a tour) to Alice Springs (seeing the famous sights on the way,) flew north to Darwin and took the train south. (With a couple of tours to see things where I was.) I love trains and sitting in a train for a few days, but even for me the Indian Pasific as sit ...


8

This almost comes under 'opinion based', but we can treat it as a compare-and-contrast option. Hi from Sydney, btw. Australia is huge. Literally similar in size to the US. That doesn't mean you can't drive across it, but you have to take things into account that don't occur to people compared with the US: gas stations are few and far between in some ...


3

The exact limitations of the eVisitor (subclass 651) visa are listed in the "Migration Regulation 1994" act: 651.611 Conditions 8115, 8201, 8527 and 8528 must be imposed. The description of these conditions is spelled out in the Visa conditions section: 8115 The holder must not work in Australia other than by engaging in a ...


4

I was in Sydney last month and was lucky enough to see one of the little penguins in the wild, during the day, on a rock, looking out to sea, about 10 metres from a pathway that is part of the coastal walk near Manly, a little West (closer to Manly beach) of Shelly beach. Here's a photo I was able to snap of it. Not the greatest quality as it was taken on ...


2

Ideally you should check with the all airlines and involved and the security administrations of all airports you go through. However that's easier said than done. In practice this is a relic of the distant past and a complete non-issue. US security (TSA) has stopped this practice many years ago. Over the last 5 years I've flown 500k+ miles in 20+ countries ...


0

It's not disallowed to carry a computer that won't power on. Rather, turning it on is just one expedient way to show that it is a genuine computer. I have travelled with a Mac mini as carry-on luggage before, whose operation was not convenient to demonstrate. It's also not uncommon at all for travellers to run out of battery on their devices. They should ...


-2

It's the opposite: Battery in the checked in luggage, laptop with you. The reason why they want to see your laptop working is that there are explosives that cannot be distinguished from a battery. So if you claim you have a laptop with a non-working battery, it could be a laptop full of explosives. A laptop without a battery is fine because they can see ...


3

Depending on how flat your batteries are. If my laptop closed down from lack of power and I restart it, it typically lights up for a second, maybe even displays the IBM screen and then dies down again. The battery symbol will be orange (signalling low power) during that entire time. In the unlikely (that has so far not happened to me, and I have to think ...


2

I don't know about the rest of the EU, but I can tell you the situation here in the UK: Summary: for strictly recreational purposes there is no legal requirement. If you had your own boat you could take it out with no training, experience or certification at all (thankfully most people don't). So the level of certification/experience needed depends on the ...


1

Since ETA is no longer an option, the fastest option is to apply for a Subclass 600 Australian visa, also known as a Visitor visa. The official processing time at the Australian consulate in Canada is 4 weeks, with no expedited option available. Unless you are in a true emergency (such a death of a relative), you will have to postpone your trip.


4

The Short Answer is: Most Probably You need to note that licencing and qualifications are not standardised across the EU and as such each country sets their own licencing conditions (in practice most EU members will observe equal terms and skills recognition between member states). Further, most states of Australia have reciprocal skills recognition with ...


4

It is illegal for civilians to wear camouflage clothing in Trinidad & Tobago, so if you're heading that way you should avoid wearing clothing (or carrying luggage) that features any camouflage patterns. When I flew there (from the UK) last year we were advised that we would not be allowed to board our flight if were so attired.


4

The previous ban would have flagged your application up for human review, which obviously isn't going to be instant and depending on the current amount of applications, could take quite a while. Other reasons could include Technical Problems or another Technical Reason.


7

From which point near the NSW/QLD border does it become legal for pedestrians to walk along the M1 (Pacific Highway)? From which point do I change my clock? Really you'd have to guess a bit, but I'd say you'd be okay once you've passed the 'Welcome to NSW' sign... Which coincidentally is not accessible by pedestrians from the QLD side on the physical ...


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Without being a local resident, I wouldn't be able to give you a definitive answer, but the general rules are that you should be fine as long as there are no signs stating no pedestrians. I'd advise that you only take a route that you know and is legal. You should be able to find this out by asking someone in the particular local area if you are not sure. ...


8

It's not a rule on paper that decides what's allowed, it's a human with their own history and beliefs who has that authority - if you can't board the flight it doesn't exactly help you that the airline apologizes to you afterwards because the decision to throw you off was clearly wrong. People get thrown off flights for the most ridiculous reasons, so my ...


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Temperature in Boston, MA on 2016-05-25: 88F (31°C). Temperature in Seattle, WA on 2016-05-25: 66F (19°C). Sudden changes in temperature can make a person sick. The pilot was simply trying to protect this young woman's health by suggesting she cover up with appropriate clothing. Thus, to answer your question: Wear clothing suitable for the destination's ...


4

There are a wide variety of reasons why you may be denied boarding. I described some of the alleged security reasons here with references: Physical appearance and clothing, do they affect the passenger's chances of getting on the plane? In the example in question, the reason was not security (or a pretence at security), it was (allegedly) decency. From ...



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