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21

I've just been in Rovaniemi, Finland a couple of weeks ago. It's currently impossible to see the aurora as the 24-hour day is in place; obviously you need a dark sky to see it. However, Rovaniemi is just by the Arctic circle, is easy to get to (fly or train from Helsinki overnight), and is also the home of Santa Claus! I stayed at the Borealis ...


14

This article is invaluable for that sort of decision. The growing season (summer) in Iceland is two months long. The tail ends of the summer are the low points, which means early June and late August. Things begin closing down in September. By Christmas, all sorts of things are closed, all though from time to time the industry tries to bring tourists to ...


14

I guess it depends on what you want to do, and how long you're staying. Traveling around the country might be a little more difficult, but if you're just staying in the Reykjavik area you should be fine. I just got back from a short trip to Reykjavik, and had a great time. As another commenter said, more darkness means more time for the Northern Lights. ...


13

Well one good reason to go would be more darkness. And more darkness = more hours during which to see the Northern Lights! If you do go, make sure to go when it's a new moon for even more darkness, and have a look at our question on aurora sightings. Also check our question on the best time of year to visit Iceland.


10

If you want to get up to watch the northern lights, rather than staying out all night I would suggest staying outside of town, otherwise you will have a lot of light pollution. on the topic of light pollution Check the phase of the moon and its location. I used Stellarium for the location and just google 'moon phases' to make sure It's isn't going to be a ...


9

We stayed in Tromsø on december (2009) and we were really lucky according to what some locals tell us. As @froderik stated, they explained that the Aurora is common from december to march and rare rest of the year. We stayed 3 days the first week of december and took these photos that were "great for this epoch": Not very spectacular, but good for early ...


9

According to wikitravel Tromsø is in the "aurora belt" between 6pm and midnight and it is dark before 6pm between mid-october and mid-march. It goes on to say that the best time to visit for the aurora is december to mid/late march. It seems that you are just on the edge of the best circumstances with the 21st of march.


9

During the night, no buses operate away from the city. The cable car does not operate at night (except during summer). Bus 100 leaves for Setermoen at 21:00 (arriving 23:25), and you could get off at a dark spot, but a bus back won't depart before the morning, and you'll be very cold. The last public transportation arriving to Tromsø is the southbound ...


9

I was in Iceland for a weekend in March and although we did see the Northern Lights, they were quite dim and not that spectacular. The guide did say that only a few days earlier they had a really good one. Wherever you go, try to allow a number of nights to get out and see them as you may not get lucky on your first try.


7

Best weather is during summer time. What I call mild is what is the average summer in Iceland. The long days make it possible to do more in one day. That does stroke with #4 though. Also some roads (to the north) close after heavy snowfall around October/November, which makes it harder to get around the country. I estimate the tourist season to end at the ...


6

My friends, boyfriend and I are talking about going to Yellowknife, Canada. My friend's boyfriend has been there and said it was amazing.


6

How do I get from Berlin to Abisko, Sweden? I have a Eurail pass, so I would like to make the most out of that. The cheapest option Berlin – Abisko on EUrail Berlin – Copenhagen, train 50473, 00:32 – 10:07 Copenhagen – Stockholm, train 536, 11:15 – 16:40 Stockholm – Abisko, train 94, 17:58 – 11:33 Details I recommend to take train 94, the direct ...


5

What's special about the aurora is that it moves, otherwise it can look quite different every time. I've seen it twice, both times rather small and weak, not breathtaking but still a special experience. But it really doesn't look like a cloud. I'd say the biggest risk is not that it would be disappointing, but that it might not appear at all (or be ...


5

You should really consider flying from Stockholm (ARN) to Kiruna (KRN). It's hour and a half, while the train is more than 17. You can then take a train from Kiruna to Abisko (takes less than hour and a half, price is trivial at 60 SEK). Unfortunatelly, you won't be able to use your Eurail pass if you take the flight. SAS has two flights per day on average, ...


5

It depends on what kind of trip you want. Reykjavik is still an amazing time, especially if you want a party. There is always the nice hot baths, that are perfect during the cold winters. And most importantly of all, the natural beauty. It is truly a sight to see during the winter, very very pretty. I hear the views are totally different during the summer ...


4

Another fine resource is SpaceWeather - with Aurora forecast maps for all over the world (it happens down under too), as well as recent photos of Auroras that people have spotted, images of the sun, info about the newest sunspots and predictions of the chance of a flare or an aurora.


4

I recently did a volunteering project in Iceland and I would say that the highest chance to see Aurora Borealis would be at Westfjords, Iceland (Mostly in winter and sometimes in Fall/Autumn or Spring).


4

what are some more affordable things to do in Norway? Anything that does not include supermarkets, hotels, hostels, campings, restaurants, public transportation, organised tours, car rental, souvenirs, postcards, may be affordable in Norway. It sounds like I'm excluding a lot, but this still includes one of the most popular activities in Norway: ...


4

In 2009 December, 2 friends and I were successful in seeing the Northern Lights in Tromso on a low budget. We spent 280 € per person in 4 days including the flight from Alicante (Spain). The cheapest way to get to Tromso then was fly to Oslo with Ryanair and then to Tromso with Norwegian. But maybe that's not the cheapest option now or from your location. ...


4

It's probably too late for the OP, but for future visitors this may help. When we visited Tromsø in February 2013 we simply rented a car and drove outside the city to see the Aurora. We were completely at our own leisure. Their is a tunnel on Kvaloya island, west of Tromsoya just a few kilometers (turn south when you get to Kvaloya), and there is a parking ...


3

You should probably book in advance, but more than 2–3 days is not needed unless you want an overnight trip. There are two aspects regarding booking tours in advance: Tours might be fully booked Tours might only go if there are enough people The anwer depends on the kind of tour. Tours vary from an extended taxi ride to a dark corner, to overnight ...


3

Northern lights look like a floating ribbon of light. They're very easy to miss if you've never seen them before. The first time I saw them, I thought it was just some car light over the hills. But my parents, who had seen them before, asked me to wait. Within minutes, we could see a ribbon on light floating in the sky, which got thicker as the time passed. ...


3

None of this suggests where you should go, but hopefully help your chances once you have picked somewhere. So earlier this year I was in Tromsø, and I got talking to a professionalism northern lights photographer who lives up there, on the flight from Oslo. He had some useful tips for trying to view them. Obviously going at short notice is best so you can ...


3

There's a new article on CNN Travel today: 5 places to see the brightest Aurora displays: There's still a chance to catch the most magnificent Northern Lights in years It cites Tromsø, Norway, Yellowknife, Canada, Fairbanks, Alaska, United States, Kangerlussuaq, Greenland and (cough) the Southern Hemisphere.


3

The likelihood of an aurora occuring at all, as well as its intensity, corresponds pretty directly to latitude, so the further north, the better. On top of that, the further north you are, the longer the nights are in winter (up to 24 hours beyond the arctic circle), which improves your chances - and offsets the fact that auroras are more common around the ...


2

I have travelled in Iceland during February (twice), April and August. I hire a car and have never had a problem. This last February it was a lot milder (and wetter) than in the UK. The interior is basically closed in winter but you can still travel the whole of route 1 (the ring road that follows the coast around the whole of Iceland) without issue. If it ...


2

Bear in mind that there's a lot of stuff you probably can't do during the winter easily - travel to the interior being an obvious one. I suspect travelling anywhere out of the vicinity of Reykarvik would be difficult/expensive. It's a pleasant small city to visit, but if I were you I'd save my money and visit during the summer when you'd have much more ...


2

The winter is a great time cause everythign is cheaper and there are less crowds. For the most part doing a self guided tour might be more difficult because of the chance of roads closing due to the snow. As someone else mentioned, winter is the best time to go if you want to see the northern lights. I'm actually going to Iceland at the end of February ...


2

I made a search here in Sweden in SJ and found a train possibility: Start: 22:30 Berlin Hbf - 08:10 Malmö C Change 1: 12:11 Malmö C - 16:40 Stockholm C Change 2: 17:58 Stockholm C - 11:33 Abisko Östra Its a 37 hour trip. If you have a better way to get to Copenhagen (Danmark) or Malmö (Sweden), then the train is very easy from there. EDIT: Just checked ...


2

It is certainly feasible to do it on your own. You can get information about aurora conditions on the website of the Icelandic Met Office. It shows expected cloud coverage for the next few days and (except during the summer) a forecast for aurora activity. If you are not a part of a tour, it is important to monitor this so you know when to stay up late! ...



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