Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Try a credit union. Many of them boast surcharge-free ATMs. Lots of smaller banks don't collect surcharges either. Those that don't often will have a big sign saying so near the ATM. The Credit Union National Association, the Independent Community Bankers Association and The Co-Op Network all have ATM locators on their Web sites. Ask for cash-back when ...


14

In general, when using your card abroad you get charged (some) of the following fees Currency exchange fee A fee levied by your bank for using your card abroad A fee levied by the ATM operator In your case (1) will not apply because the currency is the same, but (2) and (3) might still apply. (2) you need to check with your bank, and you should be ...


14

First of all, it depends on why your card is retained. I can think of at least three common situations: You have entered a wrong PIN too many times. Your issuing bank has decided to cancel and retain your card, e.g. because you have exceeded your credit limit and they want to prevent you from charging the card at "offline merchants". This may of course be ...


13

Per http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/payments/crossborder/index_en.htm cross-border payments in Euro within the Eurozone must not be treated differently from national (inter-bank) transactions in Euro. This also applies to ATM fees. This means that your bank is only allowed to charge fees similar to those for national ATM use at another bank. Examples ...


11

I would be very surprised if you managed to find an ATM that did not charge you a fee. US card holders are also charged fees if we use an ATM that is not the same bank as our card. Then we usually get a fee from both banks: the ATM's and our bank (for not using one of their ATMs). Some non-US banks that branches in the US; I think that would be the only ...


10

What I did for my three months long backpacking trip is that I brought 500 Euros in cash and exchanged it on my first, second day. I probably shouldn't have done that as the exchange rate got significantly better in the next few weeks. I also had rest of my money on my (Croatian) bank account and had my Visa debit card with me. Along with this card, I have ...


8

I've been living in Europe now for about 5 years but still make the bulk of my income from the US (where I'm from). I have tried many US banks and all the debit cards you can imagine. Most promises of low transaction fees and hassle-free transactions are lies. Here's what I've learned. Bank of America (BofA) I used BofA for all my ATM transactions for 2 ...


8

Check with your bank to be sure, but I would say Yes. I use the Bank of Nova Scotia, and since it's part of the Interac network, I can go to a CIBC or Bank of Montreal machine (or a white label machine in a convenience store) and get cash. The other bank tacks a service charge on which can be 1.50 or 2.00. I would think at a minimum you will be treated the ...


7

Not sure where you heard that information. I was in Malaysia about two years ago, any significant Malaysian bank will accept your ATM card. And I had no problems while in Kuantan OR Kuala Lumpur. Now, there are banks non-Muslims are not permitted in, but there was only one of those I saw while in Kuala Lumpur. A bigger issue, at least when I was there and ...


7

Once you go outside of your home country the vast majority of ATM transactions are handled via either the Visa or MasterCard owned networks. Even where they are handled via other mechanisms, you can pretty much presume that any ATM which is going to to allow international cards to be used is going to be a part of the Visa and/or MasterCard networks. This ...


7

You'd probably want to know about the Global ATM Alliance. The Global ATM Alliance is a joint venture of several major international banks that allows customers of their banks to use their ATM card or debit card at another bank within the Global ATM Alliance with no International ATM Access fees. However, other fees, such as an international transaction or ...


6

Yeah, same story here, but i think i got only charged ~1.50 - $2 earlier this year (Arizona, Utah, Oregon, Idaho, Washington). My strategy was to just take out fewer, larger amounts what would last me a week or so and pay with credit card for expenses > $50 like grocery shopping, gas stations, motels etc. But ask yourself how much money you would really ...


6

NAB currently charge a fee of $4 plus 2% on foreign cash withdrawls, and 2% on foreign transactions (other than cash withdrawls). However, if you have a NAB Gold account (which has a monthly fee unless you pay in a lot each month), then there are no foreign transaction fees (including no fees on foreign cash withdrawls). So, if you want to take money out ...


6

When you have a card from another EU-country, it's possible that your bank has a partnership with one or more German banks and those will have the lowest fees. You should ask your bank. At the airports and train stations there are some ATMs that have very high fee- avoid those. Use only ATMs that belong to banks (Postbank, Deutsche Bank, Sparkasse, Citi ...


6

If the ATM is in a bank agency and it's working hours you can go inside and ask them to give you the card back. It's not 100% guaranteed that they will give it back. Each bank has its own policies. Most likely they will identify you (you probably have to give them an ID or Passport), they will make a copy of the ID/Passport and they will return the card. ...


5

I found it hard enough finding an ATM in Vancouver that would even ACCEPT my card (or my friend's). However, keep an eye out for HSBC ATMs, they seemed to be the ones guaranteed to take both my UK and New Zealand credit/debit cards. Failing that, any 7-11 never failed to accept my cards. And yes, some do charge extra fees. (This was last month - was ...


5

I currently use the Charles Schwab High Yield Checking card, which reimburses all ATM fees charged by other banks (even internationally). It's a little bit of a hassle to set up as it requires you to have a linked (but free) brokerage account with them as well. And it's just ATM fees, foreign transaction or currency conversion fees still apply, as far as I ...


5

I don't know if it is possible to get Euros from ATMs, but I can help you with your general strategy by quoting my Lonely Planet: The denar isn't convertible outside Macedonia. Restaurants, hotels and some shops will accept payment in euro (usually) and US dollars (sometimes).


5

I'm quite sure that within the Eurozone, the cost of international Euro withdrawals are not allowed to exceed the cost of national Euro withdrawals (when using regular bank cards and regular banks). So, the maximum you can get charged is what you get charged at home. I did a quick search, this Wikipedia page seems to back this up: ...


5

There are some pairs of banks across the world which apparently have agreements not to charge each other's customers extra fees. I work in tourism in Australia and some travellers tell me if they go to bank XYZ they can avoid fees. As an Australian travelling overseas I am not so lucky. But check with your bank in your country whether they are part of ...


5

From the Lonely Planet forums: Transit passengers who do not clear customs will not have access to any ATM in Incheon Airport. The only ATMs at Incheon airport are outside the sacred circle of customs. So if you need cash when you land at Incheon, you have to clear customs. There are two currency exchanges on the transit side that will ...


5

The important thing to do, is to know what flag your card belongs. What I realized in my trips was the ATM machines don't cares about the bank or country of your card. The flag is important. If the flag belongs to Visa or Mastercard, being assured that even most of ATM Machines will accept this. This is important also to discover if the bank that has ...


5

One thing you should be aware of is not all cases of an ATM eating your card are merely accidental equipment failure. There is actually a variety of ATM skimmer that prevents the ATM from properly ejecting your card, allowing the thief to come along after you have left, and steal your card: ...


5

It depends on the (retail) rate/fees your bank/credit card company is charging compared to the rate offered by the bank/money changer operating the ATM. Both depend on the current exchange rate but they are not identical to the interbank exchange rates. Your bank should provide information on fees and exchange rates (for example here are the rules for ...


5

The only way to answer this question conclusively is to call the bank which issued the card. There should be a phone number on the back of the card which you can call. You should ask a few key questions: Will the card work in your destination country/ies? Do you need to inform the bank of your travel plans and dates? (Many banks will notice foreign ...


5

When it comes down to it, it's often a people problem rather than a system problem. Someone could accidentally write down the note and forget to press the button, or mis-read a flag on your account. With HSBC in the UK, I travelled to all sorts of countries without notifying them, and despite their 'security', never got flagged or blocked. South Africa, ...


5

I live between Japan and the US, and travel regularly in Europe and SE Asia. My American bank issued credit cards regularly get blocked for suspected fraud (I should not that two cards have actually been defrauded before). My solution is to have three credit cards and two debit/check cards spread across two banks so that I always have a backup, and also its ...


4

The amount you can withdraw from an ATM depends on the bank in Nepal. Some (usually old) ATMs only allow 10K, but if you ask around you can find ATMs that you can withdraw 20K and I found one in Pokhara which also allowed 30K. The Nepal banks doesn't charge any fee when you withdraw so the only thing you pay is to your own bank. It's best to have a card ...


4

28 Degrees offers a Mastercard (credit card) that doesn't charge international fees. If you put your card into credit and just withdraw your own money, you won't be charged cash advance fees. But if you withdraw their money, you get charged at credit card interest rates until it is repaid. It's a way of avoiding the fees charged by the Australian banks when ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible