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4

A few tidbits about Visa Debit cards (from the USA I am guessing). While they work in all USA ATMs, as you discovered they are not always tied to the Plus ATM network so you need to make sure the ATM machine displays the Visa logo. If you have a choice, when outside the USA the card should be treated as a "credit card" not a "debit card" when used for ...


4

In general, from all my travels, it has been very inconsistent. It varies from airline to airline and country to country. I don’t have an answer to your question, but have some alternative solutions. Though your inquiry about a bus ticket is something I haven't investigated as it is not always easy to get a bus ticket over the internet in many countries. If ...


3

What you are encountering is "voluntourism". It is a feel good travel product, which provides some minor benefits for the organization you are being volunteered for. Many countries require work permits or business type visas to volunteer, as they consider your benefits (free room, food, etc) as remuneration for "work". Organizations counter this by ...


3

The black currency market in Argentina is called the "blue market" or "dolar blue" and is a daily changing situation. An answer here will not serve future readers well; but my answer is a little too long for a comment. Today, you can check https://twitter.com/dolarblue for the standard but unofficial USD$ to peso rate, and against which any blue trader will ...


3

I just recently visited both and they are quite different. The Argentinian side is much bigger with many viewpoints on the falls including 3 or 4 pleasant trails that can easily fill a day. The Brazillian side is beautiful too, I wouldn't say it's less beautiful as some say it's more intense and concentrated in one main area and you feel the strength of ...


3

To not rush, and to be able to really take in the spectacle, you should consider taking a large part of a day to visit Iguazu Falls, on either side. With this, I'm saying that you shouldn't try to visit both sides on the same day. But, visiting the falls on the other side is very easy. You can take one of the many regular public busses that travel between ...


3

If you are travelling on an Argentina passport, you will be able to apply for leave to enter at a UK port. The applicable rules for this case are found in Immigration Rules for visitors which has this to say about funds... (the applicant) must have sufficient funds to cover all reasonable costs in relation to their visit without working or accessing ...


3

Short answer After a bit of searching all I can say is it's conflicted. You can book a bus to be on the safe side, it lessens your chances of being refused but it's no guarantee either. As @user35350 mentioned, I remember I had to buy my bus tickets in Argentina as they were not available over the internet so keep that in mind. Long answer Consular answer ...


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It takes about 40 hours by bus. that's according to the schedule of omnilneas I would recommend to break the journey into several pieces, there are lots of things to see on the way.


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For Philippine passport holders, it is possible to get a visa for Argentina while in Brazil. I did this before and it can be expedited same day process. People in the Argentina embassy in Brasilia were very helpful.


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By ferry, there is also a third company (SeaCat) which make the Buenos Aires - Colonia crossing and their rates are generally the cheapest of all three companies. I agree Mark, however, that you'll leave yourself quite short on time if you go via Colonia. If you fly, since the former Uruguayan airline (Pluna) closed in 2012, your only options are LAN/TAM ...



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