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8

The Antarctic Peninsula is a part of the sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina. If you are taking a ship that goes only there (and not to the Falkland Islands, for example), you are technically not leaving Argentina at all. I went to the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia last November. The crew took my passport before I boarded the ship, and returned it ...


7

Argentina appears to follow the common rule that you must apply for a visa at the consulate that covers the area/country where you live. Your nationality determines whether you need a visa at all or not, but once you have determined that you do need a visa, it is your residence that governs where to apply. You don't write where you live, but if you live in ...


7

I have traveled extensively throughout Argentina, and I would have to say that the siesta (which does exist in some places) has never affected anything I wanted to do there. Within Buenos Aires, many smaller shops are closed for a siesta, but then many are not, and large ones certainly are not. Outside of Buenos Aires, the siesta may become a factor, but ...


6

For the most part, no. I've travelled extensively in the country as well as the other answerer, and can confirm it never seemed to interrupt anything - indeed most cities don't seem to follow it any more. However, the one place it DID affect was in Mendoza. I spent two weeks there doing a Spanish class each morning, and if we wanted to go to the post office ...


5

No, as a Swiss citizen you do not need a visa for visits up to 90 days. References: Official Argentinean Immigration (Spanish), TIMATIC, Wikipedia


5

One of the simplest is to find your nearest hostel in town, and go find the backpackers. Someone is bound to have just arrived and wanting the local currency (ARS), and may have USD or EUR to give you in exchange.


4

I did this in January 2014 and I'll try to address your questions: 1) Renting a car in El Calafate is no problem. After some googeling and reading reviews in the Internet, I decided to opt for Nunatak Rent a Car and never regretted the decision. They reliably picked us up from the Airport, even though our flight was a couple of hours late and in generally ...


3

It depends on what provinces are you are visiting, perhaps in the north siestas might be an issue, but Buenos Aires for example people don't usually take naps. I was in Tucuman and I wasn't aware there was a siesta and for 4 long hours the city was like a ghost town, but gas stations, restaurants and shopping malls were open


3

Find the nearest friendly little tree and sell your pesos on the blue market: What is the best way to get ARS using USD?


3

I spent a few months in South America, starting in Buenos Aires with limited Spanish skills. I found it hard, trying to use my broken Spanish. I then asked my brother who had been there a few months earlier how he managed, as he had zero Spanish knowledge. "I just spoke English" was his reply. Granted, he mainly did the big tourist spots - Buenos Aires, ...


3

Except for the most upscale touristy places, you cannot rely on having someone in reach who speaks English; it will often be the case, but not always. But it sounds like you're willing to put in some effort (in addition to what you mentioned, I would of course also take a dictionary and/or phrase book along), and as long as you're polite and patient, you ...


3

None of it is particularly scenic. I've bussed most of those routes, and for the most part - especially on the plains, it's fairly standard. The BA to Puerto Madryn was like 20 hours. It was striaght and smooth and a very easy bus ride. Most of it is dull though, flat and ordinary, but you can bus overnight and it's not too bad. I'd suggest Puerto Madryn ...


2

There are two exchange rates in Argentina. The legal rate and the illegal rate(blue). If you want to stay out of trouble you should go get the legal at all times. There is less chances of getting ripped off with counterfeit money from the legal exchange offices. Your best bet is to only take USD with you as it is super hard to find places to change other ...


2

I recently came back from a 6 month trip to Argentina where I also visited Iguazu falls. I only stayed on the Argentine side instead of crossing over to the Brazilian side. I will tell you one thing that I didn't see mentioned in the comments. You should add way more time to whatever you plan on doing because it is currently summer in the Southern ...


2

I would try to arrange to "board" with a Welsh-speaking family while in Patagonia. The arrangement could be made beforehand, or possibly while you're there and find one. You're going to have to eat/sleep SOMEWHERE. Just do your best to make sure that the "somewhere" is with a Welsh-speaking family.


2

The blue rate is the street rate. You will be changing dollars on the street. So, yes, there is a risk involved. That said, it's a fairly small risk. Though technically perhaps not legal, street changers are so common and the exchanges are so public, you're likely not to run into problems. In Buenos Aires, go to the city's main shopping street, Florida. ...


2

You can bring in merchandise up to a value of $300 by air or sea or $150 by land. Technically, bringing in merchandise with an industrial or commercial purpose is prohibited. You need to fill out form OM-2132. For the laptop you are importing you can pay by credit card (Mastercard, Cabal or Visa only) but there is a 15% surcharge. The authorities may request ...


2

In El Calafate, you will find lots and lots of small travel agencies that offer tours to Torres del Paine. They're quite flexible at organizing whatever you want to do at a reasonable price. Of course in your case, you'll want to book in advance. So just search for "travel agency el calafate" and write some emails.


1

You can buy them on eBay. One seller from China has them now at for $5 for 5 connectors plus $3 shipping. The category is here: http://www.ebay.com/sch/Connectors-Ties-/41982/i.html


1

Your boyfriend is an Argentine national (non-visa national) who contemplates spending 18 continuous months in the UK by combining VISITOR and T5 Sportsperson visas. For your first question: is it possible to switch out of visitor into a T5 Sportsperson visa? Briefly, the answer is no. It is not possible to switch out of visitor into ANY category. ...


1

If you are stepping out of the airport in Columbia then you might have a problem as you will be required to go through customs there. As far as taking the phones into Argentina it depends. Usually you are only allowed ONE device per device class(i.e. cellphone, tablet, camera, laptop) per person. So legally if you bring more than that in you will either ...


1

You have to contact your local Argentinian embassy / consulate in Brazil who will determine if you're eligible to get an Argentinian visa. I'm speculating here but given that you're a non-resident in Brazil, the Argentinian consulate MAY ask you to obtain a visa from your home country, the Philippines. I understand that you obtained a visa for Panama while ...


1

Use azimo.com, this has been a life saver for me. Allows you to send peso to several locations in Argentina for pick up. Its safe and cheap, and most importantly its at the blue exchange rate!


1

According to Buses Fernández they run 8 buses a day from Punta Arenas to Puerto Natales "todos los días del año" (ie every day): Incidentally Turismo Condor operate full day trips from Puerto Natales to Perito Moreno (via El Calafate) every day (but have a 4 person minimum).


1

Most of the locations you want to visit are very distant from each other, perhaps you could take a Bus from Mendoza to Cordoba (I think it's a trip of 500km). One disadvantage when traveling inside Argentina is that most cities are connected through Buenos Aires.


1

There are hardly any lines at the border. But when I was going by bus from Brazilian to Argentinian side, and had to step off the bus to get my passport stamped (which took maybe 5 minutes for 10 people), the bus driver did not wait for us. We had to wait for the next bus, which go every 30 minutes. Then, going from Argentine to Brazilian airport by bus, ...


1

Legal or not, there is reason to defer buying Pesos with Dollars because inflation in Argentina is running at around 11% pa (was as high as 20263% in 1990) and more like 2% in USA. So each month exchange is deferred the purchasing power of USD relative to ARS effectively increases by almost 1%.


1

Argentina commonly uses dual plugs that fit European and Australian/Chinese plugs. Make sure that you have the Aussie plugs though as not all are dual plugs.


1

I used Movistar all over the country. You can buy a sim (pronounced seem) in a Movistar office for 30 peso. Once its activated you have to then go buy credit from a shop or kiosk, I would just go into a shop and say "recharge" and point at my phone, they will then ask for your number,best to have it written down to show them, and the amount of credit you ...


1

You can get one in almost any corner(convenience) store that. They will either have a sign saying that they sell "tarjetas" or you can ask them. FYI don't load too much money on your bus card at once as certain cards only work in certain cities.



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