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14

As someone who travelled a lot and stayed in many hostels let me say I also saw similar behaviour in many places, not only hostels but also on buses and at tourist sites. This is not limited to South America, but also happens in South East Asia and India. When speaking to Israelis who travel alone and are usually a little bit older they confirmed my ...


7

The Antarctic Peninsula is a part of the sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina. If you are taking a ship that goes only there (and not to the Falkland Islands, for example), you are technically not leaving Argentina at all. I went to the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia last November. The crew took my passport before I boarded the ship, and returned it ...


7

Easy. For starters, there's a bus (don't take it) from Venuezuela via Lima and Santiago to Buenos Aires that I was told about while there, takes a week. But gives you an idea of the max time you might spend on buses, given you're doing a bit of tracking around. Lima to Arequipa and then Cusco can be done in 1-4 days depending on what stops you want to do. ...


6

I have traveled extensively throughout Argentina, and I would have to say that the siesta (which does exist in some places) has never affected anything I wanted to do there. Within Buenos Aires, many smaller shops are closed for a siesta, but then many are not, and large ones certainly are not. Outside of Buenos Aires, the siesta may become a factor, but ...


6

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


5

When I travel I usually just withdraw money from an ATM. Does that mean that in this case, I should be bringing lots of USD to exchange? Yes, it means exactly that. Does it have to be USD? Do they accept Australian dollars at all? You might be able to find someone who does, but it will be much harder and the exchange rate will not be as favorable. ...


5

Part of this may depend on where you are renting the car from. For example, if you're renting in El Calafate, it's pretty common for people to take cars over the border into Chile to go to Torres del Paine. While the permits and necessary steps might vary between different car rental companies, the offices for all the car rental companies should be able to ...


5

If you are arriving from an international flight, you will probably land in Ezeiza (EZE). There you have two good options: Remis (car with driver): When you arrive, after the customs control, you will see a bunch of stalls selling this service. There is a flat fare to the city center of around AR$200. Some companies are cheaper than other, shop around ...


5

There is a question exactly like yours on Trip Advisor. The gist of the answers is: Noone cares. Taxis don't have car seats to offer and you're not required to have them to travel with kids, so your wife holding your 3 month old will be just fine. Normally most countries(and states) exempt taxis from child safety seat requirements. Discussion on the ...


4

So there are two options. 1) You're planning on doing a Salt Flats tour, if you're going to Uyuni? Most of these run from Uyuni to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, or vice versa, and take 3ish days. It's well worth it and you should consider that if you haven't already, as it'll make the next part really easy. Once you're in San Pedro, there are buses over ...


4

Here is a good detailed article regarding Mobile Internet in Argentina. http://www.robhyndman.com/2011/01/04/mobile-internet-access-in-argentina/ Note the author mostly stayed to urban areas. He also added an update at the bottom you might miss Quick update: I’ve been dazzled by how popular open wifi is in Argentina, even in small towns. Bars, ...


4

For the most part, no. I've travelled extensively in the country as well as the other answerer, and can confirm it never seemed to interrupt anything - indeed most cities don't seem to follow it any more. However, the one place it DID affect was in Mendoza. I spent two weeks there doing a Spanish class each morning, and if we wanted to go to the post office ...


4

I tried a flight for next month on there, and the times range from 13h 40 to 46h 20(!) - quite a difference. Once the page is loaded for your dates, on the left choose more filters, and then play with the stopover and leg times - reduce them and you'll start to see the shorter flights. South American airlines often work on a hub-spoke model, like the US - ...


3

Sort of. If you use the multipurpose RometoRio site to search for routes between those two cities, you can see that there's a bus that takes 3 hours, with a link to sol del paraguay to buy it. However, it is in Spanish. If you have Google Chrome, however, there's usually a popup 'translate this page' option which will try and convert it into English onthe ...


3

Except for the most upscale touristy places, you cannot rely on having someone in reach who speaks English; it will often be the case, but not always. But it sounds like you're willing to put in some effort (in addition to what you mentioned, I would of course also take a dictionary and/or phrase book along), and as long as you're polite and patient, you ...


3

It's not legally required, but obviously it's safer to use one if you can. That said, we've found using baby carriers like Baby Bjorn to be a pretty good compromise. They're not as safe as a car seat, but much better than relying on your arms and much more convenient to carry around. They're also a lifesaver at airports when waiting around in immigration ...


3

There are regular and express ferries from Buenos Aires to Montevideo. One option goes directly to the Ciudad Vieja district of Montevideo, situated very close to downtown, with the Buquebus ferry company, and takes about three hours. Another option is the ferry+bus combination (which I've personally done in the reverse direction), which has two companies ...


3

No each of these countries has a different set of carriers. Even where the name is similar such as Claro Peru and Claro Argentina the SIM chips do not work on each others networks. However the solution is simple. Just buy a cheap unlocked phone here (most phones in South America that I have seen have been unlocked) and buy a new pre-paid SIM chip in each ...


3

One factor I would like to add: the "blue" exchange rate can be quite different in different places. Namely, when there are a lot of tourists around such as in Ushuaia or El Calafate in Patagonia, the supply of Dollars is much higher and the exchange rate will not be as good for you. It will not be as easy to find "cuevas" as in Buenos Aires (where they ...


2

My answer would back up what I've read here so far. Caminito is cool, on the walk to the stadium you should use caution, but beyond the stadium you should probably not venture too far. I did with a group of people and as predicted the two who were straggling got held up at gunpoint by a drugged out guy. He took the nice camera hanging around the guys neck ...


2

It's entirely possible, cheap, and simple. Go to the main bus terminal in Puerto Iguazu. Get on a bus going to Cuidad de Este (it'll likely just say 'Paraguay'), and it travels across into Brazil to Foz Iguacu, and then across another bridge into Cuidad de Este. You'll go through customs/border at Argentina/Brazil, and then...probably again going into ...


2

I spent a few months in South America, starting in Buenos Aires with limited Spanish skills. I found it hard, trying to use my broken Spanish. I then asked my brother who had been there a few months earlier how he managed, as he had zero Spanish knowledge. "I just spoke English" was his reply. Granted, he mainly did the big tourist spots - Buenos Aires, ...


2

I recently came back from a 6 month trip to Argentina where I also visited Iguazu falls. I only stayed on the Argentine side instead of crossing over to the Brazilian side. I will tell you one thing that I didn't see mentioned in the comments. You should add way more time to whatever you plan on doing because it is currently summer in the Southern ...


2

As long as you have a valid passport and you are allowed to enter into Brazil from Argentina, yes, you can do that. When I went to the Iguazu waterfalls I was staying in a Hotel in Brazil, but I spent a couple of days on the Brazilian side and a couple of days on the Argentinian side. I passed the border a couple of times per day without any issue. Just ...


2

Have you looked at the map? That's a long ways away. I don't know exactly but it's going to take a few days to get from Uyuni to Iguazu. What's going to take you longest is having to stop at destinations while waiting for the next busy. I recommend not trying to go straight through and instead make a few stops and enjoy the local places where very few people ...


1

There are hardly any lines at the border. But when I was going by bus from Brazilian to Argentinian side, and had to step off the bus to get my passport stamped (which took maybe 5 minutes for 10 people), the bus driver did not wait for us. We had to wait for the next bus, which go every 30 minutes. Then, going from Argentine to Brazilian airport by bus, ...


1

January is summer time in Argentina and it is the high season. Flight prices will be more expensive than any other time of the year. If you flight from Buenos Aires to Ushuaia, you could consider flying with Lan Argentina instead of Aerolineas Argentinas. If you try to book online with a non-Argentinean credit card on Aerolineas Argentinas, suddenly the ...



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