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The Antarctic Peninsula is a part of the sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina. If you are taking a ship that goes only there (and not to the Falkland Islands, for example), you are technically not leaving Argentina at all. I went to the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia last November. The crew took my passport before I boarded the ship, and returned it ...


6

I have traveled extensively throughout Argentina, and I would have to say that the siesta (which does exist in some places) has never affected anything I wanted to do there. Within Buenos Aires, many smaller shops are closed for a siesta, but then many are not, and large ones certainly are not. Outside of Buenos Aires, the siesta may become a factor, but ...


4

For the most part, no. I've travelled extensively in the country as well as the other answerer, and can confirm it never seemed to interrupt anything - indeed most cities don't seem to follow it any more. However, the one place it DID affect was in Mendoza. I spent two weeks there doing a Spanish class each morning, and if we wanted to go to the post office ...


3

Except for the most upscale touristy places, you cannot rely on having someone in reach who speaks English; it will often be the case, but not always. But it sounds like you're willing to put in some effort (in addition to what you mentioned, I would of course also take a dictionary and/or phrase book along), and as long as you're polite and patient, you ...


2

I spent a few months in South America, starting in Buenos Aires with limited Spanish skills. I found it hard, trying to use my broken Spanish. I then asked my brother who had been there a few months earlier how he managed, as he had zero Spanish knowledge. "I just spoke English" was his reply. Granted, he mainly did the big tourist spots - Buenos Aires, ...


1

It depends on what provinces are you are visiting, perhaps in the north siestas might be an issue, but Buenos Aires for example people don't usually take naps. I was in Tucuman and I wasn't aware there was a siesta and for 4 long hours the city was like a ghost town, but gas stations, restaurants and shopping malls were open


1

There are hardly any lines at the border. But when I was going by bus from Brazilian to Argentinian side, and had to step off the bus to get my passport stamped (which took maybe 5 minutes for 10 people), the bus driver did not wait for us. We had to wait for the next bus, which go every 30 minutes. Then, going from Argentine to Brazilian airport by bus, ...



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