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39

There are a few ways to visit Antarctica. Remember that nothing is ever guaranteed and it's quite possible with weather that you might not make it there. Cruises: Larger cruises often will get you close but not to the land. You'll have the comforts of cruising. These big ships may be regulated soon. Smaller ships will often let you get right onto land. ...


37

There are seven countries which have territorial claims on parts of Antarctica: Britain, France, Australia, New Zealand, and Norway, which all recognize each other's claims; and Chile and Argentina, whose claims are disputed. In practice, however, all claims are suspended under international treaty, and there are no checkpoints or immigration officers. For ...


26

Almost all tourist methods leave from Ushuia, in Argentina. You could get work on a boat, book a cruise, or take a tour with GAP Adventures, among others. However, there is almost NO cheap option. However, if you're after a cheaper option and have some time to spare, arrive in November. It's the start of the season and many of the boats aren't full. As ...


21

Work in Antarctica: USA vacancies: Degree Requirements M.S. in Physics, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science or related field is required. B.S. in Physics, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, or related field and substantial (equivalent to a masters degree) experience will be considered. Russian vacancies (from here): ...


19

There are no Polar Bears in Antarctica, except for at Zoos. There are also no Zoos in Antarctica. So all up, you're pretty safe.


19

As Mark noted, no scheduled flights pass directly over Antarctica. As to which goes closest, I think the Qantas flight QF17 / QF18, between SYD (Sydney) and EZE (Buenos Aires), is a good candidate. Mark said BA to Auckland would be the southernmost flight, but the post he quoted is from 2005 and Qantas started the QF17/18 service in November 2008. Also, ...


17

According to Airliners.net, Aerolineas Argentinas operates the world's southernmost (scheduled) commercial route in the world, from BUE (Buenos Aires) to AKL (Auckland), which flies in about 50-55 deg South of the equator. (As it happens I've taken this flight, which is a nice bit of knowledge for me :)) Second is probably JHB to SYD (Johannesburg to ...


15

Another approach you can take involves getting seasonal work as an unskilled laborer in support of one of the governments doing research there. In particular I think Great Britain, the United States, Australia, and Russia have big Antarctic programs and thus employ a lot of civilians. If you're looking for a job at one of the American stations, almost all ...


12

I could not find any reference that confirms these claims. Anyway I found out this article in The Guardian: Cruise ships carrying more than 500 passengers will be prohibited from landing anyone. Only 100 visitors are to be allowed on shore at any given time, in an attempt to prevent damage to the region's unique ecosystem. So it seems that the limits ...


10

From http://www.lonelyplanet.com/antarctica/practical-information/visas: No single government controls Antarctica, so visitors do not need visas to go there. But with the ratification of the Antarctic Treaty’s Protocol on Environmental Protection in 1998, all visitors who are citizens of countries that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty must have ...


9

I believe most of the most popular route is by cruise ship and the most common departure port is Ushuaia, Argentina.


6

There are some expeditions that you can join as a single person. Most of these take place during November, December, January and February (example). Just start this December. As you can see, it is a relatively short tour because you fly to 89° longitude. But nevertheless, it takes approximately three weeks.


6

Depends where you are coming from, and how to get to that transit country. If you come by air, you can go form Australia or Chile. More people however seem to come by boat. Most boats leave from New Zealand, Argentina, Chile or Australia. I would decide between those 4 depending where is the easiest to get a Visa, and then search for operators through those ...


5

Certainly. Qantas flies them from Australia. Antarctica Flights They're infrequent, but a few a year do fly down. I watched a documentary on it, it's crazy that you can pay less for an 'inner' seat where you don't even get to see out the window without craning your neck! From the site: The flight provides a full day of Antarctic experience. Our ...


4

Become a researcher in an Earth/Planetary Science department or in a lab that studies the physics of ice. The department I'm in at Brown University does send expeditions to study the dry ice valleys in Antarctica (to study parallels with Martian climate). Alternatively, do research on penguins (though there are not many penguin researchers in the world). ...


3

well, you need no visa for Antarctica itself as it doesn't belong to any country :) Of course as uncovery mentions you will need visa for the country you're staging from, and if you're visiting a base on Antarctica the country operating that base may want you to have a visa for that country as well. As most countries from which you can reach Antarctica afaik ...



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