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15

You can go to French Guyana or Suriname. Both countries are for 80% covered by the Amazon rain forest and they are not touristic hotspots. Being part of the EU, French guyana would provides a safety net, comparable to EU standards. My favorite being a bauxite-covered road with the road sign "Bienvenue sur l'autoroute de France" and the accompanying orange ...


12

I recommend you to go with a local guide instead of an international one. You may find some very different options depending on the city you plan to start. You can start in Belem, near the ocean and go through the river to the deep continent or you can start directly in Manaus. Both are big cities and you will find good places to stay there.


10

One way would be to go through an Adventure travel company that offers trips in the region. They'll have their own trained guides that have extensive knowledge of the area and will generally have lots of reviews so you can get an idea of whether or not the trip is good. Examples http://www.gapadventures.com/ - Great trips through the amazon ...


8

Things that you need : Boots + Safari/Cowboy Hats Clean water Mosquito repellent Mosquito net Long Stick Things to consider : Vaccination Get a complete set of vaccinations before you travel to the Amazon rainforest. This can defend yourself from common diseases including malaria, yellow fever, meningitis, hepatitis, rabies and dengue. These illnesses ...


7

I've only been to Amazon jungle near Manaus, Brazil. If you're imagining yourself and a guide whacking your way though the jungle I think you're going to be disappointed. There are many developments on both sides of the river and lots of boat traffic. Most tourists stay at a "jungle lodge" which is typically just a simple hotel set on the riverbank. ...


4

I have never been there, but one traveler and author, Beata Pawlikowska wrote several books about the jungle. She would go to Iquitos and hire local Indian guide there. And I believe, good communication in Spanish will be necessary, as few people there would be able to speak English. Unfortunately, only a few of the books have been translated into English ...


4

The CDC (Center for Disease Control) has a list and information about health in Peru and health in Ecuador. You'll want to make sure your MMR, Polio and other regular ones are up to date. Tetanus too, because it's just annoying to have to get in a foreign country if you do injure yourself. Scroll down the list, and you'll see Hep A, B, Typhoid are also ...


3

You've essentially asked where is it dry except where it's dry? Galapagos and coastal provinces are usually dry around this time of the year. The rest of the country expects moderately rainy weather in March which means a higher probability of rain. You may be lucky some days, while others not. Jungle trips are possible and you should expect rain there any ...


3

Neither Peru or Ecuador require you to have a Yellow Fever vaccination before entering (see http://www.passporthealthusa.com/vaccinations/yellow-fever/ for a list of countries that do require it such as Bolivia). However there is some Yellow Fever in the Amazon areas of both countries (see map of Yellow Fever infected areas in above link). So if you are ...


3

So Rabies is suggested? Before I started traveling I thought I don't hang out with animals I don't need that, in the end I still took it, better safe than sorry. I was bitten by a street dog in the hills around Cusco (near Machu Picchu). I was just walking down the street when a bunch of them attacked me. So you need three rabies shots and they are not ...


3

I am an American expat. operating a small adventure tourism company out of Puerto Maldonado, Peru called WildPERU. Our operation is geared more towards adventure-style travel in the S.W. Amazon Basin in Peru including boat travel up-river, camping and trail walking in the forest and Pampas. We call it more of a "dirt-under-your-fingernails" kind of ...



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