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9

You can buy your tickets here. The price is about 185 USD. It's not necessary to do any special preparation, as the train will take you back to "normal" altitudes after a couple of hours at 4200m. When I was in Argentina, the train didn't work, so we had to rent a car to do more or less the same path the train makes. We stayed about 2 or 3 hours at 4000 ...


7

It's actually pretty common to sleep at Cusco your first night. My brother, for example, flew from Lima to Cusco. It's not ideal and you're likely to have a headache, but it's uncommon for anything too serious. You definitely want a full day (two nights) based in Aguas Calientes if you want the full experience. The reason being if you want to be on the ...


7

I travel & trek regularly between 3000-5000+ meters , and I find altitude sickness highly predictable : practically everyone I've seen sick have been outside safety guidelines . First night between 2000-3000, third night still below 4000 , and max 500 meters higher in sleeping altitude for every night ...end of all major problems. Diamox not only ...


7

Machu Picchu itself is only around 2400 metres above sea level - well below the altitude that most people would suffer any real effects of altitude sickness, and about 1000 metres lower than Cuzco (3400 metres) where most people visit before heading to Machu Picchu. If you are planning to trek then it really depends on which path you take. The "Inca Trail" ...


6

Essentially what you're asking is covered quite extensively in "Avoiding or minimising altitude sickness". In terms of Machu Picchu, be aware that the treks are NOT easy walks. The Inca trail is a long, difficult walk. Extremely fit and active relatives and friends found it to be, and I quote "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life". You're in the ...


5

First of all DON'T listen to tour operators. I made this mistake when I went to San Pedro di Atacama (Chile). On the first day I bought a tour to >6000 m. I suffered a severe form of altitude sickness. Afterwards I could judge on the pictures taken that the scenery was breathtaking. While at location I only felt miserable. I needed 2 days to recover, which ...


5

The best thing you can do is acclimatization. This means you should adjust your body gradually to the height. This can be done for example by increasing the height you're staying from day to day. Another very important fact that is widely used by mountaineers is that you should always sleeps some meters below the highest point of the day. So for example you ...


5

I think Mark already mentioned most things you can do in his question. There is also some medication you can try. In Bolivia this stuff was pretty cheap (as was most other medication) and I assume it is readily available in places where it is needed. I also like to emphasise his point about the randomness of mountain sickness, just because you are fine in ...


4

There is plenty of high altitude to be had in the great indoors as well as the great outdoors. When I taught a course in Colorado Springs, I was astonished at how thirsty I was. I always have a bottle or two of juice or water a day when teaching (standing and talking is actually thirsty work), but I drank both of them by morning coffee break. I replaced ...


4

Please, do be careful with the altitude; I've had some horror stories. Generally it's considered that above 2400m things start getting interesting. It's definitely worth acclimatising for a couple of days if you're doing anything physical at that altitude. However, as you point out, it's a passive activity for a short period of time. Perhaps take some ...


4

I have to disagree with the suggestion that it depends on your health and fitness condition. I had a severe case of altitude sickness while in Atacama in Chile for a week. Together with two others who in their professional life were well-trained soldiers. I wouldn't say I am a master example of well trained body, but the soldiers definitely were. I think it ...


4

Altitude is something you can not really prepare for with a trip of the length you are undertaking. Climbers spend several weeks walking into basecamp areas and several more weeks hanging at the base to slowly acclimatise themselves. Spending one or two nights at middle altitudes will not make any real difference. You might as well go straight to Cusco. ...


3

From personal experience, it is not as bad as it may seem, but then again it probably depends on your health and fitness level. I am 37, my wife is 33, neither of us is very fit, but not we are not couch potatoes either. We flew from Lima (sea level) to Cusco and stayed there for 5 days. Before the trip we had similar concerns as you had, and we also had ...


1

It seems to me you're worrying too much. :) If you want to see the sunrise at Machu Picchu, which is highly advised, you'll have to stay the previous night in Aguas Calientes. I would advise against staying two or more nights as the village has very little to offer. You might indeed get altitude sickness. To minimise the effects, take it easy. So, it ...



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