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5

Aperitivo? Apericena? Aperiwhat? In the traditional sense, an aperitivo is a pre-dinner drink, where pre-dinner means that it is usually consumed before having dinner. It can be either alcoholic or non-alcoholic and its purpose is to open up one's appetite before the meal. In order to fully open up one's appetite, the aperitivo is usually accompanied by a ...


13

Note: I am Italian, and travelled my homeland peninsula from north to south, and from west to east. Sorry to contradict some of the previous answers, but no, aperitivo/apericena are not limited to the Milan area. Maybe it started as a cultural movement in the north of Italy, but I can assure you that nowadays (well, it is since I can remember - that would ...


3

If you are transferring i.e. not arriving or departing from Hamad Intl. Airport; you are allowed to carry alcohol with you. The limit is 5 ltr. per person. You will not be allowed to leave the airport with the alcohol. Please read As a transfer passenger you may carry alcoholic beverages in your baggage. However these must be packed in containers of ...


8

The question is rather broad, I'll try to answer each point. Each answer is based on my experience and can be very subjective. Aperitivo experience greatly vary. It's about meeting with friends or colleagues after work, having a couple of drinks which come with something tasty to eat. How can I find out whether a specific bar offers an aperitivo? Some ...


4

FWIW My experience in Milan is that it varies from place to place. Sometimes it is complimentary if you are drinking, sometimes you pay extra with your first (or second...) drink to have food as well. The food might become free at the end of the evening if you have been there for a while and there are leftovers. Sometimes it is a modest mid-evening snack, ...


6

You're asking a lot of questions, and I can answer a few of them. First, I was under the impression that the aperitivo was something more of the Milan area, but perhaps it has grown into a much wider phenomenon. When I first encountered it, I definitely thought it was a phenomenon. There does not seem to be an online resource to find out about places ...


-1

The 'buffet' style this article you mention talks about is not common. In general you can expect a plate of small snacks, not a full meal. The buffets will definitely be more expensive than 4 euro, so I doubt if it'll really be that 'cheap dinner' you talk about. But I guess that depends on how much you eat.


4

If it's checked luggage, there should be no issue. You're in transit, not entering the country. If you were entering the country, however, you'd need to be aware of the limit of 4 liters of alcoholic beverages as your limit of wine, according to the Emirates Customs website. This is also confirmed on the Dubai Airport website's page. If it's in your carry-...


43

The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...



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