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111

In Bulgaria, Russia, former USSR countries and others, it's considered offensive not to drink when you've been invited to, and you might need a good solid excuse if you decide not to drink at all. Expect to be on the receiving end of some good-natured banter if you decide to abstain completely. Medical reasons are a possibility, although it will be ...


39

I was in the unfortunate position of being insistingly encouraged to drink 3 years ago on the Trans-Siberian. I was much worse for wear after that experience, and sought out suggestions (in fact I really shouldn't have had that much considering my meds). Anyway, this year I returned. And indeed, the best way if you can't just refuse outright, is simply to ...


27

As a Russian and non-drinker, I want to add some info about the culture of drinking in Russia. First of all: You don't have to drink vodka, even if your partners are. It is ok if you just say: I can't drink alcohol as strong as vodka, I need wine (or cocktails, or whatever you need). Ask women about this - they're more reliable in such situations. But if ...


27

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


24

I'm a Russian who doesn't drink vodka. If your goal is not to drink at all - just say so and be done with that. If you like to drink a little but just don't want to kill your liver - tell them that you prefer cognac or whiskey (whichever you like the best). Wine will also work but probably raise a couple of "be a man" things. The goal is to have a drink ...


21

I'm French and I didn't know about this law, nor can I find any mention of it in a casual search. This site with teaching material for the restaurant business claims the contrary: Can we make a customer pay a supplement if he wishes to bring his own bottles? Yes, it is possible to charge a “corkage fee” if the customer wants to be served his own ...


20

Driving a car is the best excuse. The best solution is not hanging out with alcoholics who don't respect non-drinkers :-)


17

It is indeed possible in theory, and VERY difficult in practice. You need to start, traditionally, at Elephant and Castle at 10am. Going at about 20-30 min per pub you will just finish before closing in Central London. It's hard, really hard, and you need someone to keep tabs on the time and keep everyone moving. There's a webpage with strategies, maps ...


17

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ ...


15

You need to drink same number of portions. But not same volume. This is major point! You can ask for half or quarter of portion. This is not break the rite. (In very difficult cases you need to drink 3 first full portion and then you can ask for half.)


15

Use the same excuse, medical reasons. You can say if you drink a little more, will really harm your medication, and you didn't mentioned before to not be rude. I think that's a nice way. Your idea!


14

Short answer: Yes, you will get in trouble. And I personally don't recommend public drinking in any Arabic/Islamic country. It is even illegal in many other countries. Long answer is that there are a lot of details to know about drinking law rules in Dubai. By the way, Ramadan is a single month per lunar year. It was in August 2011, it will be in July ...


14

It's normally the driver's duty to bring the "éthylotest" (or "alcootest"), but some renting companies are providing one or two. Otherwise it costs 2 € in shop / pharmacy. Links (in french) for companies saying they provide it (in brackets, price you pay if you used it): Avis (? €), Budget (? €), Europcar (6 €), Hertz (5 €), Sixt (5 €). Always ask to be ...


13

I haven't been in this position in Russia but I have been in Romania and Serbia just recently. Nobody seemed to mind when I ordered lots of glasses of water while I was drinking. I had an excuse for being dehydrated (once from being on the beach all day and once for having hitchhiked a long way). I didn't refuse drinks but I had as many waters as ţuicăs, ...


13

I've been to Japan twice now and have spent a good deal of time drinking in Tokyo. I've never had any issues. Hostess bars have a reputation for this kind of behaviour (i've never been to one so i can't speak to the truth of that reputation). I've never had any issues with drink spiking or credit card fraud, even when i've been drinking alone in Roppongi. ...


12

If you have no specific medical condition that would be exacerbated by anti-anxiety drugs, I'd say you should at least try them to see if they work well for you. Most of them don't have serious side effects if you don't take too many, or too often. Excessive drinking has well-documented negative effects, among them the possibility of violent behaviour that ...


12

I would suggest you look for another solution. Deal with the root cause instead and go on a fear-of-flying course. In the UK, where Vass is, both Virgin and British Airways run regular one-day courses at major airports, which include a short flight. I went on the BA one some years ago and it was certainly money well spent as far as I am concerned; I'd ...


12

The import laws cited on the the page of Norway's Toll Office do not distinguish between the manner the alcohol has been created (because that would likely be rather difficult); only by the strength. You're allowed for free (see the link for how much you have to pay if you need to import larger quantities): One litre of an alcoholic beverage containing ...


11

My preferred method, because it requires no special equipment: Wrap the bottom of the bottle in a towel, or place a phone book against a wall or tree. Hit the bottom of the bottle firmly and evenly against a reasonably flat, vertical surface (such as the wall, or a tree). The pressure of the wine against the cork will gradually nudge the cork out. As an ...


11

Dirty-flow's answer is not really wrong, however, I want to substantiate it a little bit. To quote from fahrrad-recht.de: Gut zu wissen: Eine Trunkenheitsfahrt (§ 316 StGB) kann nicht nur mit Kraftfahrzeugen, sondern grundsätzlich auch mit dem Fahrrad begangen werden! Eine Trunkenheitsfahrt liegt immer dann vor, wenn das Fahrrad nicht mehr sicher ...


11

I am a "bouncer" in Boston. As far as the state of Massachusetts goes, it is very clear: Boston bars must ID all people who appear to be under the age of 30. Acceptable identification includes: U.S drivers license, U.S liquor identification, U.S military card, and all U.S. and international passports recognized by the U.S. What is NOT accepted: ...


10

There are 7 trappist beers (6 Belgian, 1 Dutch). From Gent, your best bets are Westvleteren, Westmalle or Chimay. None are easily reachable. To Westvleteren you get the train to Poperinge, for Westmalle Antwerp is your best bet and for Chimay you need to go to Charleroi. From the stations onwards you are depending on either a taxi or the (infrequent) buses. ...


10

Yes, every French car will be required to carry a breathalyser, even rentals. However, as noted on the AA website, as of October last year: The implementation of the sanction for drivers not carrying a breathalyser – a fine of €11 – has been postponed from 1 November 2012 to 1 March 2013. This was due to a shortage of 21 million or so ...


10

As of July 13, 2013, permits are no longer required. Customs has an FAQ for this: Can I import Absinthe or oil of wormwood into Australia? The controls on the importation of ‘Oil of wormwood’ and products containing ‘oil of wormwood’, have been repealed from the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations 1956. Permission is no longer ...


9

Simply push the cork down into the bottle and pour.


9

I work in a grocery store as a cashier. We sell liquor. We can accept any state issued IDs for the US, as well as passports. We are not permitted to accept any other forms of ID. This is a corporate policy, but I doubt that it is unique. However if we get a passport we can't read, we need to have a manager look at it (like they can read it). I would not be ...


9

It depends primarily on the airline policy. The only airline I believe is Royal Brunei Airlines which allows consumption of personal alcohol on-board because it does not serve any on the aircraft. Any airline which serves alcohol on-board typically does not allow consumption of personal alcohol. I suspect the reason for this is to maintain decorum during ...


8

I would go further and say this is incredibly unlikely - if anywhere is going to sting you on cost they will do it 'legitimately' (that is, 'sitdown' charges, cover fees, high drink prices, 'door' charges etc). I have a friend who works in a hostess bar, and whilst the concept is still a little sleazy, they are still businesses and stick to charging ...


8

Porter is currently an unfashionable beer style, as far as the mainstream goes, so in the larger 'chain' pubs you'd be unlikely to find one. However, that's not to say there's none to be found! Your first step is to find the right kind of pub, for which there are many resources available; the best physical one I would say would be CAMRA's Good Beer Guide ...



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