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9

I don't find any relevant EU regulation at the moment and the practice may even be based on national law, but the purpose is to determine if the purchase is subject to VAT or other taxes. At least in Germany, purchases from shops in international airport terminals are not subject to VAT if the customer is a foreigner (not German citizen) and is bringing the ...


8

It would depend on the security officer that checks you in and the country where your flight originates. TSA doesn't allow frying pans especially cast iron ones it's check only as evidenced in a blog from Forbes. TSA also has a mobile app now that you can look at. But since it's a flight originating from another country TSA rules may not apply so ...


7

Short answer: To be sure both, and check with the customs of the place you're flying to if it's an international flight. The airport security will have it's own rules, probably based on national or international standards. The airline will also follow those rules but may impose additional rules or requirements. Finally the country you are flying to may ...


6

At the end of the day, the airline. Airline get full control over what goes into the plane's cabin and hold, so they should be your first point of contact. They will also generally be aware of the airport (or, rather, government) restrictions of the day. However, since airport security is run by the government, they've also got their own rules that you ...


5

In the Dutch airport shops there is the rule that only outbound passengers may buy goods in the 'duty free' shops. They are not really duty free anymore but the rule still stands. All outgoing passengers are allowed to buy, so it is not nationality nor destination. I guess that those airports where they do not have that restriction use the boarding cards as ...


5

I have never seen a comprehensive list, but most major international airport websites have terminal maps and most of the time they show immigration counters and/or areas. In which case, you can research before you go and safely assume there will be exit formalities if there is any sort of immigration facility noted on the departure level before the gates. ...


4

Most countries except for the UK, USA, Ireland, Mexico and Canada impose formal exit checks in the same way they impose entry checks. (I am excluding passenger information being submitted to governments, by exit check, I mean all departing passengers queue up and an immigration officer looks at every outgoing passport.) Therefore unless you are exiting one ...


4

It's very simple — since you won't be passing through immigration on your outbound leg (assuming an intra-Schengen flight), the first leg you are taking is not international. Same applies for other modes of transport - just because I take a flight to the US after taking the train to the airport doesn't mean it's necessarry to arrive to the train station 3 ...


3

As a standard operating procedure JetBlue suggests to check-in 3 hours before departure. This is coherent with the travel tips on the Nassau Airport website, which also suggest to arrive 3 hours before the departure of your US-bound flight: Plan to arrive at the airport at least three hours before your U.S.-bound flight and two hours for all other ...


3

Without knowing exactly which shops and items, it is hard to tell. I would suspect it has something to do with duty-free shopping, where you have to show proof that you are actually leaving and taking the items with you. Duty does not apply to everything you might purchase, and certainly not to food or drink you are going to consume on the spot.


3

As Gagravarr said, if it's on the same ticket, you don't need to worry. 1.5 hours is plenty of time even if you have to go through customs and have a checked-in baggage. Oslo airport is pretty small, so even if your first flight arrives slightly later, you'll still make it easily. In case it's late more than an hour and the flight to Germany is on time, then ...


2

TL;DR: Possible? Sometimes. Recommended? No. Due to complex hysterical raisins, Singapore applies different Customs rules for visitors to/from Malaysia. So legally, the answer is clear: You may qualify for tourist refund if the following conditions are satisfied: ... Depart with the goods via Changi International Airport Departure Hall / ...


2

Norwegian Air's web site has an explanation on connections. If you have a single ticket with a connection, ninety minutes is more than enough time for the physical transfer and, moreover, if you miss the connection because of bad weather or another delay, they will book you on their next flight and pay your accommodations meantime. For two separate ...


1

No. The only difference over a pure domestic itinerary at the first stage is that there will be a bit of extra time at the check in desk if (a) you have some weird through-check-in problem with a partner airline down route that day and (b) visa/passport checks. The other thing is that the "three hours required" thing is a bit of a myth. In some airports, ...


1

In general if you are traveling on one ticket, with both a domestic leg and an international leg, the international rules override the domestic rules. So when you check in, you are checking in for an "international" flight and the check in counter agents need to document your permission to enter (passport, visa, etc) the international destination. But the ...


1

At least in some airports, this is unrelated to duty-free or other taxation issues. Airlines get rebates from the airport based on the amount that their passengers spend in airport shops. Many European airports have a very large proportions of low-cost flights, and most or almost all flights are within the EU. While the sticker price of the flights is very ...


1

Since you have no bags, no customs. Passports can be bypassed but it usually doesn't save any time. All non-Schengen aircraft park at the far end of the international pier. That includes your flight and your onward BA flight. The easiest way, if you have a U.S. or EU passport, is to go through passports into the Schengen zone, follow the corridor to ...


1

I flew Amsterdam-Rio last year, it landed more or less on time, maybe 20 minutes late, but there was an incredibly huge queue at the passport control, that took slightly over an hour. In case your flight is also an hour late, you'd miss the connection, and the flights to Iguassu are more expensive in the last minute. I really wouldn't recommend that ...


1

I've changed this from a comment as it's longish and, while not strictly addressing the letter of the question, it does address the spirit, and adds some cautionary advice. The equivalent functionality to an insurance selling machine is often achieved nowadays when an online ticket is bought as part of the overall transaction, using wholly customer-machine ...


1

I arrived at Terminal 2 at night and had a big surprise: there is no bus that takes you to T1 or T3, only a taxi. So be prepared with at least 50-65 AED to pay to the taxi driver that will get you to T1 or T3 metro station. Everyone says the transfer is available only if you have a ticket to fly to another destination. I was very disappointed about this.



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