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4

Here's what the TSA website says for "small swiss army knife": Check Only In general, you are prohibited from traveling with sharp objects in your carry-on baggage; please pack these items in your checked baggage. Scissors with blades smaller than 4 inches, small needles carried for special medical needs, and other sharp objects that do not ...


0

I don't think anyone can give you a percentage, because it is based on suspicion of the individual, and also because security agencies do not release such information. However, I have visited Israel a number of times, and in my experience, TLV security has been significantly easier and more rational than security at major U.S. airports or at LHR. ...


1

I have a Global Entry card, which allows for TSA Pre access, but only on UAL, not Frontier or Southwest. My wife has never applied but generally gets TSA Pre on her UAL boarding pass also when we book and fly together. Go figure.


9

The TSA Can I Bring?, impressively, has entries for both Balloons (inflated) and Balloon (uninflated). For Balloon (inflated) it says: You may transport this items in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane. ...


1

After traveling successfully with canister stoves multiple times, I had my MSR canister stove (the tiny burner attachment, not the fuel) taken away by Jet Blue at LAX from my checked luggage. (They asked me if I had a stove when I checked in and I of course answered honestly). Their regulations apparently prohibit all camping stoves. So don't fly Jet Blue ...


3

No. Leather is transparent to x-rays (just like human skin, which is why medical x-rays work). If they see a large enough mass that they can't see through (if you happen to travel with a lead-lined bag for instance), they'll usually want to take a look at it. It's more likely that the officers don't care, especially because the liquid containers in question ...


16

No. The rules are crystal clear. They are not in the business of measuring how much liquid you have, they judge based on the container. Even when it's crystal clear there is extremely little liquid they will demand throwing it away if it's in a too large container like a sip on the bottom of a water bottle. Edit: as a rule maker, if your goal is to regulate ...


0

He/she can also buy one of these super folded travel bags, have it folded at wallet size before going to airport, and then use it after security as travel cabin bag. Usually Duty Free also sell this type of bag plus normal travel bags but I am not sure for this airport, you can email the airport direct maybe?


3

I believe that you are right that all the stores that sell luggage at SFO are post-security. They aren't going to have a particularly large selection (possibly just carry-on sizes only), and this traveler would surely be better off stopping at a real luggage store on their way to the airport if at all possible, but I'll accept that's impossible for them. I ...


2

Let's say you buy a spare battery for your laptop and forget to put it in your carry-on (as per IATA rules). What happens next? "Do nothing" happens. Remove battery happens. Fine or prosecution MAY happen. Take you off plane is less likely than take bag off plane, leave you on. | Despite @JonathanReez's comment, the risk from checked batteries is ...


15

They can put the watch wherever they want. Watches are not safety relevant items (like laptop batteries) which can not be put into checked luggage. Your parents may have to declare the watch at customs and may have to pay duty or taxes on it. But that's completely independent of what luggage they are stowed in. If it needs to be declared, custom will most ...


11

If this watch is of any value then I would strongly recommend to put in in the carry-on luggage, to make sure it is not (1) stolen or (2) broken when the checked-in luggage is handled on the airport.



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