New answers tagged

1

These checks are usually done when traveling to the US (at least from Kuwait and Dubai). I have yet to be asked to turn on my laptop when traveling to Europe, for example when transiting through Dubai; and the same when I flew to Malaysia (again, transiting through Dubai).


0

From the official website of the airport: In order to ensure the highest levels of passenger security, each terminal has a security check area at each point of entry, so you will need to go through security again if you have moved between terminals.


1

All international passengers arriving at Abu Dhabi airport have to go through security once. After that you can check your next airline on the screen or printed boarding pass which terminal to go. There would be only 1 security when you will be entering and after passing there would be no additional security again


2

Adding to the answer of @chx (+1), I have traveled within Europe as recently as January 2016 with 2-3 external hard drives (and some other electronics) in my carry-on and while it did win me a selection for the explosives test, there was no problem whatsoever and security staff was very chill about it.


2

A lot of threads on both Tripadvisor and Flyertalk confirms there is no problem. Even a less than a year old thread on 10-12 hard drives have lots of reports of no problems. Photographer here who often does similar/the same: you're totally fine. I have had TSA ask me to power up my laptop and tablet but never a portable HD I've traveled with 3-...


4

To directly answer the title question, it appears that the answer is "Yes, if you want to enter the country." You might be able to refuse the request, but then you might be denied entry. The following information is from the advice that the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs provides to U.S. citizens traveling to Israel: Video cameras ...


3

Yes, assuming they issue you the Known Traveler Number (KTN) before you fly, you can add it to your reservation. As long as it's at least 72 hours (3 days) before the time of your flight, you can add the KTN to your reservation via Delta's website. After that, you'll need to call or visit an agent at the check-in desk. To do it on Delta's website, go to the ...


15

TSA pre-check will be indicated (or not) on each boarding pass for your journey. Providing you are travelling through an approved airport on an approved airline, you should receive pre-check on all segments of your journey.


2

From an airport security standpoint I think the helmet should cause no problems in your carry-on. The TSA prohibited item search tool does not mention bicycle helmets. It does however mention all other types of helmets including motorcycle helmets, which are considerably tougher than bicycle helmets and can be used as an offensive weapon. Interestingly ...


3

I have done this many times with a standard roll-away suitcase. I see no reason that a backpack would be different. I have always joked that if anyone hassles me, I will wear the helmet, and say I have fear of flying.


1

I've done this...mostly. At the last minute, I thought about a big bag of unidentified powder, and stuffed the whole bag in a smaller empty protein powder container. It didn't even matter that it was a different powder from the one I was taking (which had a much larger canister) - the packaging let it go through without difficulty. Stories I've head say ...


0

I will answer one part of the question because I have a lot of experience with flying with monitors. It's not easy. Monitors are fragile and you want them big and the airlines don't want you to carry big things around and don't care about fragile. This post will be full of product endorsement but I do not link them, Google is your friend. This is the result ...


2

Ideally you should check with the all airlines and involved and the security administrations of all airports you go through. However that's easier said than done. In practice this is a relic of the distant past and a complete non-issue. US security (TSA) has stopped this practice many years ago. Over the last 5 years I've flown 500k+ miles in 20+ countries ...


0

It's not disallowed to carry a computer that won't power on. Rather, turning it on is just one expedient way to show that it is a genuine computer. I have travelled with a Mac mini as carry-on luggage before, whose operation was not convenient to demonstrate. It's also not uncommon at all for travellers to run out of battery on their devices. They should ...


5

In this answer, I've cited the IATA guidelines, which most airlines will likely follow (though deviations are possible). In summary, you should be fine if your computer's unremovable battery is up to 160 Wh. Current MacBook Pros (as of 2016) should be under 100 Wh. The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2015 states (emphasis added): Passenger ...


8

According to the United States FAA, lithium-ion batteries are allowed in checked baggage so long as they are in a consumer electronic device and they are not too large. The FAA has separate regulations about "portable electronic devices, containing batteries" and "lithium ion and lithium metal batteries, spare (uninstalled)". For the former: Most ...


3

These are not considered as "sharps"1, but my recommendation is to carry them in a carrying case (something like this item from Nisi): I would not risk it in checked baggage unless you put them in a Pelican case or something extremely robust. Source - sadly, first hand experience with checked in photography equipment, even though it was in its original ...


23

For reference: The 15" MacBook Pro carries a 99.5 watt hour battery. The 13" MacBook Pro carries a 74.9 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 13" carries a 54 watt hour battery. The MacBook carries a 41.4 watt hour battery. The 12" iPad Pro carries a 38.5 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 11" carries a 38 watt hour battery. The 9.7" iPad Pro carries a 27.5 ...


-2

It's the opposite: Battery in the checked in luggage, laptop with you. The reason why they want to see your laptop working is that there are explosives that cannot be distinguished from a battery. So if you claim you have a laptop with a non-working battery, it could be a laptop full of explosives. A laptop without a battery is fine because they can see ...


5

It's simply a "sniffing" device. You could say it "smells" for molecules of things such as explosives. There are a number of different varieties. Some have a throw away "swab" or thing that looks like a "piece of tape" on the end. In that case the swab is used once and thrown away. And the plastic stick is nothing more than a $2 plastic stick. Other ...


3

Depending on how flat your batteries are. If my laptop closed down from lack of power and I restart it, it typically lights up for a second, maybe even displays the IBM screen and then dies down again. The battery symbol will be orange (signalling low power) during that entire time. In the unlikely (that has so far not happened to me, and I have to think ...


2

The scan is looking for traces of explosives, gun powder and other incidendary type chemicals.


7

Customs officers generally have the legal authority (the details will be different depending on the country) to search all articles, and typically people, entering or leaving their country. As a matter of efficiency, it makes the most sense for them to focus their efforts on passengers they believe may be carrying prohibited items. Every country's customs ...


6

They will issue you a nine-digit known traveller number. Once you have it, you can add it to any existing flight reservations. Once time I added my KTN to my reservation when I checked in at the airport, about five minutes before I went through security.


3

Airport security officers may, randomly, ask that you turn on electronic devices (usually do something to activate the display) to show that they are functional. To do this, the battery must not be completely discharged. If you are unable to turn on the device, they may not allow you to bring the electronic device through the checkpoint and you would have to ...


3

If you don't leave the United States, you do not need a passport - remember that most Americans have no passport at all. You do need a 'Secure Government Issued ID'. That could be - aside from a biometric passport from any country: a State issued Driver's License - if your state does already have Secure Driver's Licenses (Florida does have them) a State ...


6

Most if not all airlines prohibit carrying fuel canisters onboard, both as checked and as carry-on luggage. It is a compressed canister containing flammable liquid. The TSA page on prohibited items confirms this. So flying from the US with the fuel canister is definitely a no, regardless of whether it can be imported in India. The stove without fuel ...


2

Each container can hold up to 100 ml and you can take as many containers as will fit in a 1 liter plastic bag. I'm not sure about the Philippines' interpretation of the rule, but some countries want a closable type bag (ziplocks, etc) and you have to be able to close it with all the containers inside.



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