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1

I've taken a laptop with 'normal' battery and external battery slice through airport security multiple times and never had any problems. Although I've also never been asked to turn it on to prove it's not a bomb.


2

Laptop batteries are usually Lithium ion batteries. FAA regulations state that you may bring up to two such batteries with a maximum of 160 Wh in your carry-on (should be similar in other regions). Your laptop batteries are very likely below that limit. Please note the carry-on part; large Lithium batteries are prohibited in checked-in baggage due to fire ...


6

At the end of the day, the airline. Airline get full control over what goes into the plane's cabin and hold, so they should be your first point of contact. They will also generally be aware of the airport (or, rather, government) restrictions of the day. However, since airport security is run by the government, they've also got their own rules that you ...


7

Short answer: To be sure both, and check with the customs of the place you're flying to if it's an international flight. The airport security will have it's own rules, probably based on national or international standards. The airline will also follow those rules but may impose additional rules or requirements. Finally the country you are flying to may ...


3

If the liquid is red, it's mostly likely alcohol (ethanol), not mercury (so less of an issue- even if it broke it would be no worse than spilling a few drops of wine). Even small mercury thermometers are specifically allowed, as Johnny says: By the TSA and some other authorities (but Cathay Pacific, for example, does not allow them). So I think it ...


3

I did exactly this - put competition swords in a firearm case and check it as baggage - when travelling through the US, Hong Kong, and China a few years ago. It's completely legal, as long as you aren't violating local weapons laws regarding personal carrying at any point, and isn't a violation of terms of carriage for any airline I'm aware of, as long as ...


3

Is there any rule about using a firearm case for other than firearms? A firearm case without the firearm is just a case. Put anything you want in it. Swords of any description are fine in checked baggage, airport security sees knives, spears, arrows and various other pointy things daily, it won't surprise them at all. and the mini sound system ...


0

For the case itself, I would get a custom made Pelican case (just google it). They are sturdy, safe, lockable, come with foam padding. In any case, contact the airline you wish to travel with and make certain they are aware you will be carrying weapons at the airport and will be checking them in properly. Also be prepared to get at the airport earlier ...


2

It will likely be treated as a weapon, enhanced by the fact that you are packing it in a gun case. Weapons are handled with a bit more care and are delivered at the end point either by hand or at a different baggage claim (often at the oversized claim door).


11

As drat's answer explains, it's technically possible, but it's also illegal. There's a sign ahead of Immigration that says "No entry except for passengers with boarding passes and proceeding to their next destination", so if you enter and do not proceed to your flight destination, you're trespassing. This is not a dead letter either: several fans of a ...


11

TL;DR: there is no distinction between arrival area and departure area, so it might be possible. However, there will be logistical and possibly legal problems. I don't think it will be worth the risk. As of the logistic part of the question, this is absolutely no problem. At Changi Airport, the arrival and the departure zones are linked together and you ...


-3

It will depend greatly on the layout of the airport. There are two major models: The airport is a transfer hub, the whole concourse is considered an international area, arriving and departing passengers mix. The airport is a national gateway or a primary destination. Arriving and departing passengers do not mix. Heathrow is an example of the former. You ...


5

No. The UK does not participate in US Pre-Clearance. As such, it is not possible to clear US immigration and customs in any UK airports If you wish to avail yourself of UK pre-clearance, your nearest option is the Republic of Ireland. Both Dublin and Shannon airports feature US pre-clearance. We've a few questions on that here already if you need more ...


5

According to the US Customs and Border Protection there is currently no US Immigration preclearance location in the UK. That doesn't mean that there won't be any in the future as: Beginning in 2015, the United States intends to enter into negotiations in order to expand air preclearance operations to new locations. Now as far as clearing immigration ...


6

Any gate at Sea-Tac is reachable from any other gate without passing through TSA security again. You can walk between concourses A, B, C, and D, but if you are traveling to or from the N or S gates, (you should be as they serve international flights) which are in separate buildings, then you can't walk; you must take the train. You will see signs directing ...


7

It's not about security (which would obviously be way too late), it's about taxes. India has heavy Customs duties and they're trying to catch people bringing in undeclared electronics, alcohol, tobacco, drugs etc, much of which is clearly visible on an X-ray. India is by no means alone in this: eg. Indonesia and Saudi Arabia X-ray all incoming bags, and eg. ...



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