Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You can also use your mexican military ID card (the card when you turn 18 you must get) if it has a photo with it. I know it can be used for land travel but I am not sure if they take it for air travel. When we crossed into Mexico last year at the border they stressed to get a mexican passport soon.


3

In the US, certain "tools" are not allowed on planes any more than "knives". I had left a small Torx wrench in my pocket once - like an Allen key but with a star shaped head, about 8 cm long. It was confiscated as a "tool" (I guess they thought I would unscrew the cockpit door with it). But that was about 10 years ago. These days, the TSA prohibits any ...


5

Most airports in "Schengen" follow all of the EU guidelines the IATA guidelines their own rules which they change every week (or while you are being controlled, or which the security guy makes up any way he feels) ... whichever is the most restrictive. The Frankfurt airport makes the first two available online in concise form, although only in German: ...


6

In practice (as opposed to "officially")... I carry one of these on my keychain, with 6 or 7 other keys. I've flown US domestic flights with it about half a dozen times and never had a problem. I gave one to all my coworkers for Christmas a few years back. One of these coworkers is a Muslim woman who wears a hijab. She flies a lot, and ALWAYS gets ...


17

The rules about knives through airport security vary from country to country. Generally, they all include "a blade over x cm in length". While x may vary, your blade looks to be at most 4 cm or 1.5". So if the rule is a blade over 5cm/2" is not allowed, you'll be fine. I think that is the rule most places, and there was talk of raising it to 7cm in the US ...


4

The TSA mentions that lighters without fuel can be checked in, but cannot be carried on the airplane in the hand-carry luggage. Common lighters are listed with an exception: Common Lighters - Lighters without fuel are permitted in checked baggage. Lighters with fuel are prohibited in checked baggage, unless they adhere to the Department of Transportation ...


3

It's not security who will ask, it's the immigration officers on arrival. If you have applied for and received a student visa, you will show it when you get there and be all set. If you're looking for more of a visa-on-arrival (like the B1/B2 I get when I briefly visit the USA from Canada) then your questions (and the paperwork to back up your answer) will ...


1

If your items are new or appear to be new, it would be best to register them with US Customs before departing the USA to avoid duty hassles on the way back. The items you plan to leave, should also be registered in case you can not leave them in Japan, but I would do a separate registration for them to avoid the "where is such & such" questions when you ...


2

Yes you should have no problems. You will be asked to remove the jacket before you go through the metal detector along with any other items with metal objects on them (e.g. belt buckles, jewelry, watches). Metal Zippers and Buttons on pants don't normally set off metal detectors. This is because most metal detectors have an adjustable threshold setting, ...


12

Before boarding, actually before entering the duty-free zone, you will go through standard security screening checks. Your jacket will have to go through an X-ray machine, and you (and your trousers) will have to go through the metal detector. In case you set off the metal detector you will be pat-searched by the security officers. Consider that metal ...


0

I don't have any specific insight into this but my guess is that designating an area of the airport to be off-limit for people who don't fly is useful to manage things like security, duty-free shopping, waiting areas, etc. Otherwise, you would either need to (re)check everyone at the gate or pay for facilities (security check, cleaning, etc.) for a larger ...


5

You have it backwards. Nobody from the airline is saying "if you want to get in the secure half, you have to buy a ticket." They are saying "the secure half is only for people who are flying somewhere today." People who want to get in the secure half even though they are not flying today don't want to be told they can't do that. (Whether they are bad guys ...


3

You weren't stopped for the simple reason that you weren't doing anything unusual or suspicious. There are many people whose jobs require them to travel frequently so that is not unusual enough to cause suspicion. And, anyway, the airport police see literally thousands or tens of thousands of people every day. Unless you're 2.15m tall and have bright green ...


2

I live in Italy and I think you were never stopped because it was an internal flight. Again, you are not likely to be stopped at any airport in Europe that is part of the Schengen agreement. For instance, I have never been stopped at airports in Belgium and Holland even though I am a non-European. On the other hand, I have to go through normal aiport ...


3

I'd expect for the common use of drug dogs (outside of specific raids) to be exactly as you describe - noone would be blocked and searched until/unless the dogs sniff something and give a signal to the handlers.


6

If these were domestic flights (flights where the start and finish are within the same country) then it's possible that they hardly stop anyone. Drug smuggling would be a non-issue because you're not crossing an international border. Security at the arrival end does not need to check that you're not a terrorist who might blow up the plane, because you've ...


38

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


2

Security. Process. Security. Sanity. At least, those are the words I mumble to myself as I progress through these repeated checks ;) Some reasons and logic: They need to check at the check-in gate to ensure that their carrier is allowed to take you. As such, they need to ensure that you have a valid passport, with a valid visa (and usually a return ...


8

The details vary but the thing is that the states themselves made it a “third-party company”'s responsibility to check passengers' immigration status. If a carrier brings someone without documentation and this person is denied entry, they will have to bring him or her back and can face a fine. Furthermore, for US-bound planes, airlines are also required to ...


13

Passports are your ID when traveling globally. Driver licenses and national IDs are not always accepted as a form of ID in many countries. As such everyone who needs to verify your identification will ask to see your passport. For flights to the USA, there is often several layers of security employed. The first is a security check before you reach the ...


7

There can be a couple of reasons for this -- one they could all be working for different people or trying to catch different things. At check-in the airline needs to know that you'll be allowed to get into your destination (and the UK & US are somewhat stricter than a lot of places). At border control the officer needs to know that you're allowed to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included