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10

For the EU, the controlling technical reference for your question is found in EC Regulation 206/2009 and the other related regulations such as EC Regulation 136/2004. I assume that 'Indian Chips' are a recipe containing potatoes (kale, bananas, and other foodstuffs qualifying as 'chips') which have been fried in oil (e.g., sunflower oil) and other spices ...


-5

MOST countries severely restrict the importation of food from abroad. Spain AFAIK is no different. So unless you want to eat the stuff on board during the flight, you're liable to get in trouble with UK customs on arrival and have to watch your stuff getting confiscated, probably also facing a fine.


3

The Manchester Airport FAQ page has a section on Domestic to Domestic flight transfer which states: Transferring from a domestic flight to another domestic flight On disembarking from the aircraft check the flight information screens for the gate of your onward flight. If no gate information is shown please proceed to the Terminal 3 Departure ...


12

The British Airways page on liquids, banned and restricted items has a link to a PDF document detailing the items which cannot be carried as cabin luggage. This document mentions toy guns as being forbidden in carry-on luggage (emhpasis mine): PASSENGERS AND CABIN BAGGAGE Without prejudice to applicable safety rules, passengers are not permitted ...


9

Within the EU, you can bring the water gun, but not the nerf gun in your cabin luggage. The relevant EU regulation ban 'devices that discharge projectiles', which should cover the nerf gun. The water gun is ok as long as it is obviously a toy gun and is not 'appearing capable, of being used to cause serious injury by discharging a projectile'. Categories ...


2

So here is what happened. Many of the really small airports and legs didn't have security at all. Domestic flights within Fiji or Vanuatu, for example, you could bring an arbitrarily large bottle of water, there was no xraying, etc. In the places where there was the traditional security setup, (including the final MIA-YYZ leg involving TSA in the US) nobody ...


2

The average European airport security is only marginally more patient than the TSA. That is to say, they are mini-dictators in their little realm. On top of that, they're paranoid, overworked and hated by all. It's not a productive mix. If they see this —and they will— they will inspect it. Some might buy that it's caffeine. Some wont. Nobody can tell you ...


2

Always carry: Labels Prescriptions Even if its in weird packets. I traveled quite a bit with herbal medicines that always raise issues: Powders Unmarked brownish/ olive/ sandy colored Pills in similar small plastic Herbal oils So, I carry: labels inside/ stuck on each little plastic sachet or bottle Detailed written Prescription from ...


0

I've carried on a container of white powder in the US and China, nobody has taken note of it. I've also carried multiple pounds of white powder still sealed in properly labeled manufactures packaging. That being said, I wouldn't bring a bag of powder, period. Put it in something more substantial!


3

I would avoid bringing samples of pure caffeine on aircraft because caffeine is somewhat toxic (1-10 g) and therefore is probably prohibited by flight regulations. Source: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/caffeine-powder-poses-deadly-risks-2/


9

Hard to tell. I do take a bunch of prescription drugs that I have consolidated into a single small zip lock bag for travel and that really looked fairly suspicious. No problems whatsoever in a 100+ domestic+international flights. Then again, your bag looks even more suspicious and a lot depends on how you may show up against expectations and profiles. This ...


55

That bag would show orange color on an x-ray machine which is the color for organic material (on most machines) and it would be very obvious even between layers of clothing which are also organic but would show a different shade(powder bag would be a very dark shade of orange). If I looked at your bag for a fraction of a second I would most likely pull it ...


23

It's possible that it might cause some concern given that it's unlabelled and white (that dodgy anthrax scare a few years back has done so much damage to air travel...sigh). However, most airports in Europe you just stroll through and don't have to get checked, quite often. If asked to declare, I'd be up front about it and mention it, rather than have them ...


1

Some other changes not mentioned here, but can be noticed: Cockpit doors are reinforced and entry during flights is forbidden (prior to 9/11 it was restricted, but was allowed). You cannot park near the airport terminal at most international terminals. Your electronic devices need to power up if you are traveling to the US and UK. This means, if your ...


3

Was it possible to enter an airplane with a knife and/or a (fake) bomb? Before 9/11 the US allowed blades less than four inches long as well as knitting needles, glass bottles and other sharp objects. When you went through the metal detector you'd either leave it in your carry on or put it in a dish. Security would often have a ruler or mark on the ...


3

What changed after that event in the passenger security check, before entering in the restricted area? Virtually nothing changed. You were still asked the 3 key questions you are asked today, Did you pack the bag? Has the bag been out of your direct awareness since you packed it? Did you pack anything you shouldn't have? The difference is that ...


2

In May 2001 I was able to greet visitors at the jetway in New York's La Guardia Airport. The rule at the time was ticketed passengers only, but the enforcement was obviously nothing like it is now. No one was matching IDs against boarding passes. Inspection of the passes was often cursory at best, and sometimes didn't occur at all. But the long TSA screening ...


41

There were a bunch of changes to US airport security screening after 9/11. I'm not sure if there's a comprehensive list anywhere, but here are a few highlights: What Didn't Change You still walk through a metal detector Airlines generally don't want their passengers starting gun, knife, or chain fights on the airplane. For one thing you might damage the ...


5

Overall, I think changes in Europe (which had prior experiences with international terrorism) were limited at first. What happened is that norms and procedures for US domestic flights were brought in line with those of other countries. In the US changes included the access restrictions mentioned by Michael, stricter ID requirements, the creation of the TSA ...


14

In US airports, the biggest change from a "civilian's" perspective was probably the fact that only ticketed passengers are now allowed in the secure area. Before 9/11, anyone could go through the security checkpoint and into the gate areas. You might see this in older movies, with people greeting passengers right as they get off the jetway instead of ...



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