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There are no restrictions from airlines to carrying a desktop computer in your carry-on (hand) luggage; as long as it fits the weight and size requirements. However, there are new requirements from the TSA regarding electronics: Electronic devices are already screened daily, but now, security officers might ask that you power up your devices, ...


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I have traveled with a desktop unit as carry on from the US on a long haul to Asia. It was packed in a daypack, with a little padding between the unit and my back. The bag was pulled aside to be manually inspected at every security station I went through (three in total), but there were no issues nor any "why" questions. (have done it twice now) Just make ...


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My recommendations would be to, use FedEx to transfer it to your new location and take the hard drive with you. TSA is very careful about those kind of things but, you can take it and check it in as fragile. I have taken tvs abroad with United as a check in not carry on.


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I would just carry the hard drive(s) (if mechanical) and would consider taking the video card out and wrapping it in bubble wrap leaving it inside the PC case if it's a very expensive one. Desktop and tower PC cases tend to be pretty flimsy sheet metal so a certain amount of crushing is a possibility, especially if you didn't save the original box. It's ...


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I always carry a mac pro (2013) for work stuff, traveled with it from/to USA, Spain and Mexico and never had a problem. Only problem I had was when I bring the computer with my carry on, the security guys always freak out when they see it with X-Ray machine, and always stops me and ask me what is that thing. I show them that is a computer and that's it. ...


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I carried a desktop PC from Canada to another country. Since I was using a traditional hard drive rather than a SSD, I removed that and took it with me in my carry on. The actual desktop PC was packed in a regular suitcase surrounded by towels and clothes on all sides. When I opened the PC up to remove the hard drive, I also cleaned it out and double ...


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No system is so secure that there are no ways around it. Yes, the loophole you describe sort of exists, but it's not that straightforward in many airports. For one, at pretty much any airport, departing and arriving passengers are strictly separated, making it very difficult to join a crowd of arrivals when you are supposedly departing yourself. Yes, in ...


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I am going to give you a different take on this question. It is in your question (customs) and seems to be overlooked in most answers. It is not really about planes, batteries, safety, or how big your bag is, it is mostly about the law of the departure and destination countries (not usually transit countries). Many countries prohibit what you can bring in ...


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I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


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There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...



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