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2

You're overthinking it a bit, and it'll likely be no problem at all. As per the product description, they're airport safe. So you have two possible options, depending on what the airport uses. metal detector - according to the product, it won't go detect them anyway. So you're through and happy. t-wave detectors might show it, but for example, two nights ...


6

This trick is used by many Piece of Plastic on bottle before you close the cap That will prevent spills. After that put it in ziploc type plastic bag Check at home before you put it in luggage.


2

If all your flights are booked on the same ticket, this means that the minimum connection time for this connection is met (unless your travel agent circumvented some rules, which they normally not do). Passport checks in Dusseldorf are usually quite quick. Please keep the comments to your original post in mind - you will need a "proper" Schengen visa for ...


2

40 minutes could be enough but it could become scarce. As your second leg is a domestic Schengen flight, you will need to get through security and passport check. With only 40 minutes between the flights it's likely to miss the flight to Munich.


16

While mathematically, your logic is sound, the answer is almost always no. Basically, they're not going to measure everything out. 3.4oz (or 100ml for simpler numbers) - what if you have 98ml or 95ml? They don't have the time or the inclination to measure all to say 'yes you're under 100ml'. As a result, it'll be on the bottle size. Source: personal ...


2

Security checks do not follow any certain pattern. If airlines or an administration feel the need they can 'make it so' and it is unlikely that they will explain why. Some airlines carry out their own checks "at the gate" - I've experienced this several times in wider Asia with QANTAS where they had their own team and XRay machine in the boarding lounge. ...


2

I don't think there is a clear set procedure, I have seen all sorts of combinations and the best conclusion I can come up with is that it depends on how old the airport is and how robust the security of the building/area is. The only common factor I found is -- if you can access the transit area without a check, then there are checkpoints at the gates. ...


1

I had the same problem once in Frankfurt airport. When you buy the new suitcase you can ask the seller to keep your old one. They will know exactly what to do with it. They are usually really happy of selling the suitcase, so they will help you in any way to complete the sell.


7

If your suitcase closes with a zip, then it can be opened with a normal biro (the ubiquitous cheap Bic office biro works particularly well). Simply hold the biro so it points parallel to the zip, with the nib end pointing into the zip teeth (I find about 60 degrees works). Then press down. The pen disengages the teeth of the zip, and you can pull them apart ...


1

Wikipedia reports that the system is currently in use in Germany, the Netherlands and in the UK. So your TSA-locked luggage can possibly be opened with the master key/code at Heathrow. But like Mark and Rory explained, I am not aware of any requirement to leave your luggage open (or to use a special system to make sure it can be opened for inspection) so a ...


19

The TSA mandates that luggage can be opened without the owner's presence. Many suitcases therefore have special locks created by a company called Travel Sentry that are designed to be openable with some sort of code/master key. If your lock has a diamond logo like the one in this picture, it is one of those locks. Image released under CC-BY-SA license by ...



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