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3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


1

While the city is only 15 minutes drive from the airport at times, given your narrow window, it would make more sense for your friend to come to the airport to meet you. Indeed, Wikitravel suggests that in busy periods, it can even take up to an hour, which you don't want if you're stressing about getting back to your flight! Assuming your bags are checked ...


3

Straight razors are allowed in checked-in luggage all over the world. Anyway, they are not allowed in hand luggage as they can be used to harm someone. I will list three sources that regulate this, TSA (US), EASA (EU), IATA (the rest of the world), these rules are not enforced all over the world, but as long as these three organizations have the same rules ...


1

Assuming you have to recheck luggage (if you have a single ticket, check with Icelandair before you do anything rash!) it will be cutting it rather close. It will probably take at least 20 minutes until your bag is on the carousel, longer than that in busy periods. The baggage reclaim is in Terminal 3 for all international arrivals, and you then have to ...


3

Unknown, but: Long ago I locked a suitcase full of electronic gear when travelling SF-London. The customs men came out and asked for the key. Thoughtful of them - a broken lock would have been within the rules. Alas, the case also held a large container of dairy whitener placed in it during packing. It has a clip shut spout for normal use AND the whole top ...


2

There are no rules against wrapping your bags with plastic film. If TSA decides they want to inspect your bag, they will cut the film off and will not re-wrap it. So it is up to you to decide to pay to have it wrapped and hope TSA doesn't cut it off wasting your money. If you are flying in from an international destination and connecting/rechecking to a ...


2

I checked this out for Canada, and the rules seem to be deliberately vague. As a visitor, you can bring certain goods into Canada for your own use as “personal baggage”. Personal baggage includes clothing, camping and sports equipment, cameras and personal computers. [...] You must declare all goods when you arrive at the first CBSA port of entry. [...] ...


8

You're generally not supposed to declare the stuff you already paid for and imported legally but you might be required to prove you did not buy them abroad, otherwise the regular import rules apply. The details will depend on the specific country and a few other things (e.g. whether you are a resident, currently moving to the country, etc.) but you are ...


5

You are only allowed to bring into a country x amount of good(s) (this varies per country). For example: The UK law for arrivals from non EU countries states: You can bring in other goods worth up to £390 without having to pay tax and/or duty. Bringing in items worth more than this amount is liable to tax, again e.g.: ...(if) you go over your ...


2

Note: this answer is a bit speculative, based on general economic principles rather than any specific knowledge about the airline industry. But I think your question may be based on the sunk cost fallacy. My understanding is that counter space is allocated to airlines as part of their lease agreements with the airport, and that these are fairly long-term ...


10

Check in counter and aircraft parking gates at airports are usually provided in as copious quantity as is possible for the space. This allows for maximum usage during peak arrival/departing times slots and allows space for expansion in terms of number of flights/airlines serving the airport. Airlines that make frequent flights to an airport tend to have ...


2

What surprised me about the other post is that while countries may levy duty on returning residents’ jewelry purchases, they generally allow visitors to bring in (as long as they take out) reasonable amounts of personal property. Not just jewelry, but also computers, videocameras, etc. In some cases a bond is required, or at the least serial number ...


9

I avoided this particular issue by having it made at the destination. That may not be an option for you, but it worked out for me. In any case, good luck! ...and she said yes! ...after initially thinking I was dragging her through an elaborate joke; me not realizing it was actually April Fool's Day. The lesson here is to consider more than just the ring ...


8

I actually did this over a fairly large journey (UK to NZ) and had absolutely no problems. It was in my carry on alongside my laptop - this was a mistake as everytime I took my laptop out I'd have a panic about the ring falling out. If it's inside your carry on it's unlikely to cause any issues.


28

USAToday actually wrote an article on this a while back. The key points were: Keep it in its box, safe and secure. (It may actually make it clearer on an xray) Avoid wrapping the box. Security may ask you to unwrap wrapped packages. Attach a small note - eg "Engagement ring inside, please be discreet". Put it in a clean sock or similar, as an extra ...


20

I would say worry only about hiding it from the recipient - keep it somewhere that person won't look - and if you happen to get a customs search, and they're clearly going to look in your bag and find it, one of two things will happen. If your beloved is with you, ask the customs officers to give you a moment, and then propose right then and there. After ...


13

Security is not an issue, a ring in a pocket of a backpack or briefcase would not raise an eyebrow from the security examiners. If you are going somewhere that absolutely requires you to declare everything in your possession to customs or somewhere that you think might do a customs search, you can always write a note to pass to the inspector while your ...


1

Are you trying to get Pre-Check clearance? If so, it's best to add your Known Traveler number to the itinerary as early as you can, since the airline sends the PNRs to the TSA about three days before the flight. Of course, the airline can resubmit the day of the flight, but it's more work, and not all check-in agents know how to do it or want to take the ...


1

You are correct that the secondary screening for liquids only occurs at certain airports, including Kong Kong (which does the check for flights bound for the U.S. and Australia). I've seen it in Tokyo Narita but only sometimes. The U.K. and Australia do strict liquid checks for all international flights. The U.S. does liquid checks for all flights ...


1

It boils down to airport organisation. There are airports where you can simply walk to your connecting flight, but in cases where it is difficult to distinguish OD passengers from transfering passengers everybody is checked.


6

There are locations that fly to LHR that do not conform to international norms regarding international safety. Lagos, Nigeria, for example, does not conform to certain protocols, and Therefore is not considered secure. Rather than ferreting out individual flights, it is considered prudent simply to screen all passengers again.


-3

If you buy the liquid after you pass the gate you are okay. BUT be careful if you have a transfer inside the US you may need to throw out your liquids or move them to your check baggage, because the US often makes you re-check-in for inter-US transfers.



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