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69

When I flew from Vienna to Amsterdam and back, my fears were confirmed: The security staff inspected me very precise, and I had to explain them my story. Thank god I have some scars left so they believed me! It is not a problem. There are many, many people with metal implants and the standard procedure is simply explaining your condition after an ...


38

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


33

In my experience, having a positive detection at the swab testing station is not a problem. The testing machines only give an indication of possible explosive residue, and are not conclusive. Several times I have had a positive detection at the swab test station (not actually carrying or handling any explosives). If they get a positive test, they may ask ...


33

Appending MR etc seems to be a trend (ie becoming more commonplace) for air tickets/boarding passes and, particularly when names are relatively long, this might be without a space. Examples: Since very likely Aegean's custom, their staff should cope with interpreting this. The key point may be that the website you refer to does indeed recognise you ...


30

I always have one or two plastic bottles with me. I empty them before I go through security and then re-fill them from a tap in the restroom in the waiting area. I've done this many times, and security never asked about the empty bottles, and even if they do you can explain what they are for.


30

It will probably make them take a few extra moments to verify it's really you but the Department of State in the United States has no rules or notices that you need to look identical to your photo. Here is a Q/A about facial hair and hair coloring on the DoS travel website I found: http://travel.state.gov/passport/pptphotoreq/photofaq/photofaq_5291.html ...


27

USAToday actually wrote an article on this a while back. The key points were: Keep it in its box, safe and secure. (It may actually make it clearer on an xray) Avoid wrapping the box. Security may ask you to unwrap wrapped packages. Attach a small note - eg "Engagement ring inside, please be discreet". Put it in a clean sock or similar, as an extra ...


26

Why do you need to give them an excuse? [Currently] we have the right to opt-out, no questions asked. Having to explain yourself eats away at this right. I've never been asked why I opted-out, but if I was, I think I would say something like "to protest overly-burdensome security regulations". Which is the truth.


25

An acronym for 'Secondary Security Screening Selection' or 'Secondary Security Screening Selectee' which is an airport security measure in the United States and Canada which selects passengers for additional inspection Though there is no published criteria how passengers are selected for SSSS, Wiki page lists few probable ones.


25

A number of airlines will append your title (MR, MRS, etc) to your first name when they issue your boarding passes, so it appears as SURNAME/FIRSTNAMEMR. It can appear this way on the gate agent's terminal as well. I have not had any personal experience with Aegean Airline's system, so can not say with 100% certainty, but likely you are OK.


22

I can give an answer to this because this happens to me very regularly, for a good reason. Typically for holders of US / UK / European / Australian / NZ passports, a wide range of countries do not require a visa in advance, or often issue them on arrival. If you're travelling within North America or Europe where these visa rules are well-known, an airline ...


21

The TSA guide says that "Realistic Replicas of Explosives" are not allowed, and yours kind of qualifies. Of course it lacks a critical component, namely an accelerant and/or explosive, but good luck convincing airport authorities anywhere in the world. The best thing that comes to mind is to disassemble partly the components, particularly the analog ones -- ...


20

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


20

One notable exception to the existing answers: If you have darker skin, and grow a particularly long/unkempt beard, you might open yourself up to some forms of racial and ethnic profiling. I have a friend who is of mediterranean descent, and has a beard that is a good 9 inches in length. He has to budget an extra two hours to pass through any airport, ...


20

I would say worry only about hiding it from the recipient - keep it somewhere that person won't look - and if you happen to get a customs search, and they're clearly going to look in your bag and find it, one of two things will happen. If your beloved is with you, ask the customs officers to give you a moment, and then propose right then and there. After ...


19

The only possible difference is that in the EU, they may not have the TSA keys. Therefore it just becomes like a normal lock that you have the keys for and they don't. So worst case, they may flag the bag for inspection and require you to open it for them. Indeed in Europe you're still allowed to lock it with whatever lock you want, so it's perfectly ...


19

It isn't a weapon, tool, flammable, explosive, chemical or liquid, so I can't imagine that it would be a problem. It isn't listed by the TSA as a prohibited item. I'd say just put it in the bottom of your bag and not worry about it. If you are travelling internationally, you may have an issue with customs depending on your country of origin and destination, ...


19

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


19

It's an interesting dilemma to be sure. Normally I pack wire ties into my carry on not the whole bag of them buy just enough to tie the locks on the luggage. They are easily removed with scissors or wire cutters but it does tell you if the bag you have checked in have been messed with since having the exact brand make of the wire ties is difficult at best. ...


19

The TSA mandates that luggage can be opened without the owner's presence. Many suitcases therefore have special locks created by a company called Travel Sentry that are designed to be openable with some sort of code/master key. If your lock has a diamond logo like the one in this picture, it is one of those locks. Image released under CC-BY-SA license by ...


18

This is becoming more and more common with more modern surgery, and things being done that couldn't be done in the past. Naturally with increased security these days, it's also more common that you'll get picked up as having metal on/in you. There are a few things you can do (and I have personal experience with this, with quite a bit of metal in my chest): ...


17

It's like any animal product - you'd have to declare it - better safe than sorry. However, if they're anything like New Zealand - who are VERY strict, they can fumigate / sterilise / wash any suspect item. For example, a friend brought an Ostrich egg back from South Africa. They took it for a couple of weeks, processed it, and mailed it back to him, all ...


17

My passport has a photo taken before I grew my beard. Since growing the beard I've traveled extensively, including the US. Never had any border official so much as comment on this. I should note that my beard is of modest thickness. A big, bushy beard may alter your appearance enough to cause issues.


17

The full list of items restricted from being brought into the United States, is maintained by the US Customs and Border Protection agency, and can be found here. Aside from the usual agricultural and weapons restrictions, be aware of the complete ban on the importation of Cuban made items, and the peculiar regulations regarding Absinthe. Also, be advised ...


17

The rules about knives through airport security vary from country to country. Generally, they all include "a blade over x cm in length". While x may vary, your blade looks to be at most 4 cm or 1.5". So if the rule is a blade over 5cm/2" is not allowed, you'll be fine. I think that is the rule most places, and there was talk of raising it to 7cm in the US ...


16

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


16

I have done this a couple of times until two years ago - within Europe only though. And while it was never I problem, I always had to show the HDD separately etc - and in the last case was recommended (by security staff at Birmingham (BHX) airport) to buy a cheap (€15) external case, pop the HDD in that and less questions (if any) would be asked. I have ...


16

While mathematically, your logic is sound, the answer is almost always no. Basically, they're not going to measure everything out. 3.4oz (or 100ml for simpler numbers) - what if you have 98ml or 95ml? They don't have the time or the inclination to measure all to say 'yes you're under 100ml'. As a result, it'll be on the bottle size. Source: personal ...


15

Best decision depends on the circumstances, including reliability of the police/judicial process, your access to a good lawyer, and your personal situation. If you're a reasonably wealthy, respectable-looking professional traveling to the U.S. or Western Europe, your best bet is to alert the authorities immediately, not make any extensive statements, and ...


15

I have had SSSS once. I extended my stay - I was supposed to fly home let's say Thursday night, but Thursday morning I changed my tickets so I would fly home Friday night. When I checked in I was specifically told by the checkin agent that the change was the reason for the SSSS - I was taking a flight I had booked the previous day. She, and everyone else ...



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