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4

For small babies (up to 6-7 months): Any time of the day will work. Babies sleep a lot at this time, and if they will sleep on the plane, they will. Usually feeding/nursing a young baby to sleep on the plane is the best way to go. For older babies and young toddlers (7 months- 1.5 years): Redeyes usually work the best I found. At this age it is very hard ...


0

There are different classes of air tickets. Going straight to the point, ECONOMY M belongs to a category booked in advance and for which refund is possible.


9

In the UK, I have travelled a few times with Logan Air (a small regional airline that only flies between different Orkney Islands, north of Scotland). Not once was I asked for an ID, not even when I purchased the tickets in person at the airport in Kirkwall. Note, of course, that their island hopper planes sit 6 passengers and don't even have a dedicated ...


3

I had to do exactly that once, at London Heathrow. What I did was to give the old bag to one of the cleaners emptying the bins. He took it and probably disposed it somewhere.


6

I fly frequently on domestic flights in New Zealand (both Air New Zealand and Jetstar), and don't recall the last time I was asked to show identification. For Air New Zealand, from Domestic Check-in: Please remember to carry proof of identity with you as you may be required to present this at check-in. A driver's licence, passport, Airpoints or Koru ...


4

If flying with British Airways (BA) domestically within the UK, you can use your British Airways Executive Club card as ID. (BAEC = the BA frequent flier program). If you're not a member of the BA Executive Club, you have to show some form of photo ID. I believe that BA still suggest you carry some photo ID with you when doing this, eg in case of being ...


11

Yes, I have experienced this quite a few times on intra-Schengen flights. As said in the link from the comments Lufthansa probably is the most prominent case due to the extreme amount of automation, but I have flown with a number of airlines and from/to a number of airports and can tell you it depends on the airport/airline combination. Routes I have flown ...


-1

"Losing" your property is not illegal. If you have a case you cannot dispose of I would just "forget" to pick it up. Coin lockers are convenient here. Or the baggage carousel. The airport (or any public space) should provide suitable disposal facilities. If they don't they create their own problems. Maybe don't leave a wind-up clock inside the old ...


1

No need to buy a new suitcase! Don't all international airports have a luggage wrapping service? If you arrive at the airport to find your luggage slightly broken, the luggage wrapping service will be a good solution. It is a better solution that buying a new suitcase in the airport. When they wrap the luggage, they often cut out the wheels and handles, so ...


2

You should probably attempt these in the given order: If the broken bag is small enough compared to the new one, place it within the new bag Ask security Ask your airline personnel Leave the suitcase open and as obviously empty as you can make it next to a bin with a piece of paper that says "TRASH" or equivalent


0

I've shipped the kid's gaming computer twice on an airline. Both times it was partially disassembled on arrival. With a huge heatsink for the chip, it must look suspicious to the uninformed at TSA. Had to rebuild it both times. Third time, FedEX - same thing.


2

typically in such cases on each leg of the flight the restrictions and fees of the company operating that leg will apply. So most likely you're going to have to pay RAM for the leg to Madrid, and US for the leg from Madrid to Charlotte. You're also going to have to comply with size and weight restrictions for each airline separate. Especially the latter has ...


9

Airlines often have seating blocks that are specifically for elite level frequent flyers (often marked on seat maps as "preferred" or simply shown as unavailable to non-elite flyers). If flights are not full, airlines may also choose not to seat anyone next to their highest level elite flyers, even giving them the whole row to themselves. But short of ...


3

I and two family members traveling together were once upgraded from "last class" to first class (in a 747) flying from Seattle to London. This was 1989, so YMMV. We arrived at the Seattle departure desk about 40 minutes before the cut-off time 45(?) minutes before departure, but had to join a long queue. At right about the cut-off time, we got to the ...


5

"Those empty seats feel wasteful." Ultimately, moving someone from economy to premium economy or to business once the plane is loaded doesn't change the number of empty seats, it only changes the location of the empty seats. The plane is still just as full as before and the airline's revenue is the same, so there is no real motivation for the airline to ...


16

You are not permitted to sit in a different cabin from your ticketed cabin unless you are moved there by the cabin crew (say, there is a medical problem and extra seats are needed mid-flight— though you'd still probably get reseated in crew seats instead of in business class). "Self-upgraders" will be discovered very quickly and removed as a matter of policy ...


5

Yes, it's fine, I've shipped this baby as checked luggage multiple times: They'll just stick the baggage label on the side. My main concern was damage from baggage handling, getting wet, etc. Tape it shut carefully, and a plastic bag on the inside would not hurt. Ask for a fragile sticker at check-in, and they'll probably make you sign a disclaimer ...


2

Aer Lingus has a section on overweight fee, but it lists it as a flat fee. Perhaps there is some mistake on either page. Excess baggage fees: Longhaul flights - all bags over 23kg-32kgs (50lbs-70lbs) 75 euros, or 65 British Pounds, or 100 US Dollars Shorthaul flights - per kg over allowance (airport only) 15 euros, or 12 British Pounds,or - US Dollars ...



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