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1

Klm provided the answer through their twitter channel: " 'BAG' stands for 'Customer has baggage on his journey' :-) Have a nice weekend!


5

No, most airlines would not allow you to check baggage to B in this circumstance. One exception... if B->C is domestic you might HAVE to take your luggage off at B to clear customs. (For example if you're talking about LHR-JFK-LAX you will get your luggage at JFK even if it's "checked" to LAX) In some circumstances, airlines might allow you to book a ...


2

The purpose of the airline checking your ticket, visa and passport is to ensure that they can legally transport you to your destination, and believe from that evidence that you will be permitted into the country of destination. For this to occur, you need to usually show some or all of: a return ticket, or exit ticket out of the destination country a ...


1

Well, if the airlines change their policies, remove restrictions and make the tickets transferable, this would create a whole new market niche for resellers. If this happen there would be many complications related to liability of the resellers, quality guarantees, safety rules and more. It would be virtually impossible for the airlines to operate within the ...


3

It is impossible for anyone to accurately answer the question without seeing your mother. The rules are based on how well she fits in the seat in question and whether the seat belt fits her. United rules are spelled out on: http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/specialneeds/customersize/default.aspx But the two biggest factors, can she fit into ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


2

I realize there's already an accepted answer about "yield management" but, while their price discrimination strategy certainly exacerbates their rationale, I think that misses the point. I think the bigger reason is quite simply that they can get away with it. Let me expand on that. When most people book an airline ticket it's because they're planning to ...


1

Another reason might be that airlines tend to overbook planes, if they can. They expect a certain percentage of passengers to cancel their flight and want to prevent empty seats. If everyone found a replacement, there would not be enough seats on the plane for everyone!


1

You're in luck. Last time I flew from Alicante the airline had forgotten to schedule one (yes, they really had failed to plan for an aircraft to be there for the trip) and aircraft and had to rent one from another company in order to get us from there to Amsterdam. Result was a 6 hour delay while an aircraft was sought and found from a wet lease agent in ...


1

Transfers can be two ways. If they have to register the transfer then of course they should be able to control the flow of cash. HOWEVER, if they don't register it, as for example might the situation if I gave you my bus ticket then, apart from the economic factors, there are clearly a few accountability and safety factors. If the plane crashes for some ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


3

I think what Relaxed meant by "non-changeable fares" is tickets that are only valid for one specific flight at a given time and date and cannot be rebooked (or only for a considerable fee). Price-sensitive passengers will book those fares, but other passengers (mostly business) are willing to pay much higher fares for the luxury of not having to worry about ...


7

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


119

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


2

There are two main reasons. Most people don't want to spend any more time sat on a plane than necessary. Would you really want to spend an extra hour sat in one of those tiny seats? It takes a lot of time to get a plane ready. The airline wants to minimise the amount of time the aircraft is idle at the gate. As soon as the passengers have left, the ...


7

Supposition on my part but aircraft have to be used intensively or competition may force the airline out of business. This means turn-around times as short as possible. I would hope that while you are held back from boarding all kinds of checks are taking place - equipment functioning, brochures replenished, antimacassars tidy, left luggage and so forth - ...


2

Note: this answer is a bit speculative, based on general economic principles rather than any specific knowledge about the airline industry. But I think your question may be based on the sunk cost fallacy. My understanding is that counter space is allocated to airlines as part of their lease agreements with the airport, and that these are fairly long-term ...


10

Check in counter and aircraft parking gates at airports are usually provided in as copious quantity as is possible for the space. This allows for maximum usage during peak arrival/departing times slots and allows space for expansion in terms of number of flights/airlines serving the airport. Airlines that make frequent flights to an airport tend to have ...


8

Yes, airlines can and do change the aircraft to be used for a particular flight (often referred to as an 'equipment change') for a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: The scheduled plane is down for maintenance. The scheduled plane is delayed in arriving from another airport. Some need came up for the scheduled aircraft to be used for ...


1

Not sure if this is useful, but based on experience I would say that someone the size of your mother will be fine. My girlfriend is 5'4" and almost 450lbs right now, and she is just getting to the point where a second seat is truly necessary--up until recently she could squish (albeit uncomfortably) and with the courtesy of the other passengers and a ...


5

Yes, you purchased transit by air, not a particular style of it. Actually, depending on whether it is an IANA governed flight or not, you may have purchased a specific weight and volume of transit space to utilize, and not actually the guarantee of personal transit. (Which is how airlines can refuse boarding to over-large passengers or require they purchase ...


28

It's true that you can often see details of the aircraft on the website now, so you could have some expectations or think you have a contractual agreement to be flown on that aircraft. But in practice, airlines merely promise a best effort to bring you somewhere and can and do do a lot of things (switch airplanes, reschedule, cancel a flight outright, change ...


18

Airlines have the right to change aircraft as they see fit. It is a quite common occurrence. Sometimes because of mechanical issues, sometimes because the passenger load would be better handled by a different aircraft, sometimes because they need to aircraft originally assigned somewhere else, etc etc. While this time you got an older aircraft, it is just ...


1

It can be confusing because the card has a range of benefits. Some benefits, such as earning two AAdvantage miles per dollar on American Airlines purchases, only occur when using the card to purchase the ticket. Other benefits, such as priority boarding and one checked bag free, occur just because you are a cardholder, regardless of how you paid for the ...


2

To answer your specific questions: My question: With what I currently have what do you think is the best way to utilize everything to get the best price, do I buy additional miles for my AA advantage program to get an anytime coach ticket and then use the 500 mile upgrades (will they let me)? You cannot upgrade an award ticket, so that option is ...


3

These 500-mile upgrades can be used to upgrade from coach to first class (or business class on a three-class flight) on all paid (not award) flights which American Airlines considers "domestic" (meaning within North or Central America, including Canada and Mexico). Each flight to be upgraded requires one 500-mile upgrade per 500 flight miles or fraction, so ...


6

I am not aware of a site targeted for strikes only, the best alternative to get fresh news from people in the aviation business is Airliners.net. There is a forum with thousands of people from all airlines and other aviation companies all around the world, they will keep you updated not only about strikes but about everything.



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