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3

To claim for delayed flights compensation in the EU under (EU rule 261/2004) should only cost the price of a stamp to your airline. You should not pay a 3rd party company to do this for you. There are some very helpful tips that are provided by Martin Lewis (The Money Saving Expert) in the UK which I followed and were successful in my claim. I presume it is ...


2

British Airways was asked (admittedly a while back), and while they don't ban it, they did say it was: "not something we would actively encourage" (source) I haven't seen a more recent source yet :/


3

I'm much taller than average and in some airplines it's already tight without reclined chairs in front of me. Thus on most flights I keep my legs in a normal position, which already makes it very difficult for the person in front of me to recline their seat. This is enough for most cases. But not all. Communication is usually the best way out of this. ...


5

I've been offered train connections (rather than bus) in two intra-German cases with Lufthansa where the flight was cancelled, but a good ICE (high speed train) connection between the two cities exist. Basically airline staff gave me the choice: be re-booked for next day, or take the train and arrive a few hours late. (The fact that Lufthansa often ...


16

It would appear not, but there's nothing stopping us from creating one. People can edit the answer as we find more. Airlines that ban the Knee Defender Air Canada source American Airlines source Continental Airlines source Delta Airlines source Jetstar source Qantas source Southwest Airlines source United Airlines source Jetstar source Virgin Australia ...


27

Such a list would not be meaningful. All airlines have wide rules to prohibit "tampering" with seats, with Knee Defenders or otherwise; you can improvise one with a well-sized bottle, after all. Those that point out the Knee Defender as banned are only making it explicit that this specific device is not allowed. More to the point, if the passenger unable ...


4

I have been offered a bus ride between Basel and Zurich (along with 50 or so other passengers) to catch a flight to my final destination after a cancellation by SWISS so there is no taboo against that. They organized it pretty quickly as well, so they were apparently ready for that, should the need arise. I guess each airline will make specific decisions ...


4

For small babies (up to 6-7 months): Any time of the day will work. Babies sleep a lot at this time, and if they will sleep on the plane, they will. Usually feeding/nursing a young baby to sleep on the plane is the best way to go. For older babies and young toddlers (7 months- 1.5 years): Redeyes usually work the best I found. At this age it is very hard ...


0

There are different classes of air tickets. Going straight to the point, ECONOMY M belongs to a category booked in advance and for which refund is possible.


9

In the UK, I have travelled a few times with Logan Air (a small regional airline that only flies between different Orkney Islands, north of Scotland). Not once was I asked for an ID, not even when I purchased the tickets in person at the airport in Kirkwall. Note, of course, that their island hopper planes sit 6 passengers and don't even have a dedicated ...


3

I had to do exactly that once, at London Heathrow. What I did was to give the old bag to one of the cleaners emptying the bins. He took it and probably disposed it somewhere.


6

I fly frequently on domestic flights in New Zealand (both Air New Zealand and Jetstar), and don't recall the last time I was asked to show identification. For Air New Zealand, from Domestic Check-in: Please remember to carry proof of identity with you as you may be required to present this at check-in. A driver's licence, passport, Airpoints or Koru ...


4

If flying with British Airways (BA) domestically within the UK, you can use your British Airways Executive Club card as ID. (BAEC = the BA frequent flier program). If you're not a member of the BA Executive Club, you have to show some form of photo ID. I believe that BA still suggest you carry some photo ID with you when doing this, eg in case of being ...


11

Yes, I have experienced this quite a few times on intra-Schengen flights. As said in the link from the comments Lufthansa probably is the most prominent case due to the extreme amount of automation, but I have flown with a number of airlines and from/to a number of airports and can tell you it depends on the airport/airline combination. Routes I have flown ...


-1

"Losing" your property is not illegal. If you have a case you cannot dispose of I would just "forget" to pick it up. Coin lockers are convenient here. Or the baggage carousel. The airport (or any public space) should provide suitable disposal facilities. If they don't they create their own problems. Maybe don't leave a wind-up clock inside the old ...


1

No need to buy a new suitcase! Don't all international airports have a luggage wrapping service? If you arrive at the airport to find your luggage slightly broken, the luggage wrapping service will be a good solution. It is a better solution that buying a new suitcase in the airport. When they wrap the luggage, they often cut out the wheels and handles, so ...


2

You should probably attempt these in the given order: If the broken bag is small enough compared to the new one, place it within the new bag Ask security Ask your airline personnel Leave the suitcase open and as obviously empty as you can make it next to a bin with a piece of paper that says "TRASH" or equivalent



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