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1

If this is a domestic flight, then the laws of the country take precedence (i.e., everyone else's guesswork answers probably apply.) If this is an international flight, however, the Warsaw Convention covers this. According to Clauses 17 and 18 of the Warsaw Convention, the airline is liable for any injury (to people, clause 17) or damage (to property, ...


3

As for liability, everything depends on what jurisdiction you'll be able to work. If it will be the European (continental - based on Napoleonic Code) law, then you're liable for every damage you have caused, and the factor of 'recklessness' or 'guilt' is unimportant. So the question will arise, who have caused the damage to the laptop, which is not obvious. ...


21

In most juristictions that operate with something approaching sanity, someone is liable for accidental damage in the following three cases: They caused the damage deliberately or with "blameworthy carelessness". They have entered into a contract where they explicitly accept to be responsible for the risk. The law contains an explicit exception for the ...


3

From a common sense point of view - #5 .... its an accident, deal with it. In the hands of a lawyer - #1, #3 & #6 .... the shotgun approach, sue them all and hope one settles rather than fight the case in court.


1

According to their site: Lost Baggage Passengers whose baggage is missing at reclaim must, on the same day and before leaving the arrival hall, have a Property Irregularity Report (PIR) prepared by applying to Station Lost and Found Offices with their Travel ticket, Baggage tag, Identity document (identity card, passport). The Property Irregularity ...


3

Klm provided the answer through their twitter channel: " 'BAG' stands for 'Customer has baggage on his journey' :-) Have a nice weekend!


5

No, most airlines would not allow you to check baggage to B in this circumstance. One exception... if B->C is domestic you might HAVE to take your luggage off at B to clear customs. (For example if you're talking about LHR-JFK-LAX you will get your luggage at JFK even if it's "checked" to LAX) In some circumstances, airlines might allow you to book a ...


2

The purpose of the airline checking your ticket, visa and passport is to ensure that they can legally transport you to your destination, and believe from that evidence that you will be permitted into the country of destination. For this to occur, you need to usually show some or all of: a return ticket, or exit ticket out of the destination country a ...


1

Well, if the airlines change their policies, remove restrictions and make the tickets transferable, this would create a whole new market niche for resellers. If this happen there would be many complications related to liability of the resellers, quality guarantees, safety rules and more. It would be virtually impossible for the airlines to operate within the ...


3

It is impossible for anyone to accurately answer the question without seeing your mother. The rules are based on how well she fits in the seat in question and whether the seat belt fits her. United rules are spelled out on: http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/specialneeds/customersize/default.aspx But the two biggest factors, can she fit into ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


2

I realize there's already an accepted answer about "yield management" but, while their price discrimination strategy certainly exacerbates their rationale, I think that misses the point. I think the bigger reason is quite simply that they can get away with it. Let me expand on that. When most people book an airline ticket it's because they're planning to ...


1

Another reason might be that airlines tend to overbook planes, if they can. They expect a certain percentage of passengers to cancel their flight and want to prevent empty seats. If everyone found a replacement, there would not be enough seats on the plane for everyone!


1

You're in luck. Last time I flew from Alicante the airline had forgotten to schedule one (yes, they really had failed to plan for an aircraft to be there for the trip) and aircraft and had to rent one from another company in order to get us from there to Amsterdam. Result was a 6 hour delay while an aircraft was sought and found from a wet lease agent in ...


1

Transfers can be two ways. If they have to register the transfer then of course they should be able to control the flow of cash. HOWEVER, if they don't register it, as for example might the situation if I gave you my bus ticket then, apart from the economic factors, there are clearly a few accountability and safety factors. If the plane crashes for some ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


3

I think what Relaxed meant by "non-changeable fares" is tickets that are only valid for one specific flight at a given time and date and cannot be rebooked (or only for a considerable fee). Price-sensitive passengers will book those fares, but other passengers (mostly business) are willing to pay much higher fares for the luxury of not having to worry about ...


8

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


120

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


2

There are two main reasons. Most people don't want to spend any more time sat on a plane than necessary. Would you really want to spend an extra hour sat in one of those tiny seats? It takes a lot of time to get a plane ready. The airline wants to minimise the amount of time the aircraft is idle at the gate. As soon as the passengers have left, the ...


7

Supposition on my part but aircraft have to be used intensively or competition may force the airline out of business. This means turn-around times as short as possible. I would hope that while you are held back from boarding all kinds of checks are taking place - equipment functioning, brochures replenished, antimacassars tidy, left luggage and so forth - ...



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