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0

"Promoting a comment to an answer - it's actually really really complicated! There's a reason why even Google can't give you an answer quickly, and why multi-city quotes can take such an age to run...." This is of course not true. You can precalculate all routes. Google has enough machines to do this. The reason is that some companies have already solved ...


0

She can dress like stewardess, may look similar with her dressing. there will some things which will differentiate her from the real steward and the crew wont have any concern. the real steward got pin etc.... (look unique).


3

this is a very complex topic involving some very advanced CS algorithms and different factors. long scientific papers have been written on the subject. the simple explanation is that its a marketplace/ auction and prices are influenced by supply and demand. the basic price is related to airline costs such as equipment and fuel, taxes, airport fees. both ...


4

According to the FAQs regarding IATA "Cabin OK": IATA is a standard-setting organization. Is this new carry-on size a new standard for the airline industry? No. Those who participate are not being asked to change their existing requirements. Some or all may continue to accept bags larger than those qualifying for the IATA Cabin OK logo. Actually, ...


8

I've worked in airlines and the process is as follows: Airlines buy or rent some planes. They also have permits to flight at a given date and time over some route. They cannot just grab some plane and fly whenever and wherever they want. If a jet costs as much as USD 150 million, and in 24 hours they can fly it for only 15 hours, the rest of time it must ...


4

There is no such set of rules. Period. Most airlines have a yield management department (sometimes called revenue management). The whole purpose of this department is to figure out how to set ticket prices to get the maximum revenue out of each flight. A lot of that is done manually (which is why they need a whole department for it, and often not a small ...


4

Just a simple (and possibly obvious) observation. Airlines want to make a profit. They have expenses for each passenger, slightly lower expenses for each empty seat, and income from each sold ticket. How much do they charge? As much as they think they can get away with. They must charge no more than the competition, and no more than the reservation price of ...


9

There are different ways to determine the price of a ticket and it depends on different factors. Every airplane has a different cabin(Y,Z,X,D...) and classes(first, business, economy...). Usually every cabin has a yield price, which is the amount of money the airline knows it has to make on every seat on that particular cabin to cover the operating costs. ...


1

Frontier Airlines http://www.frontierairlines.com/fron...nied-minors.do We're sorry but we won't accept unaccompanied minors who are under five years of age. Children under the age of five must be accompanied by an individual 15 years or older. We consider children from ages five to 14 to be unaccompanied minors when traveling without a companion of at ...


0

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


6

No, they don't. Security looks for weapons and bombs; if it's not either, they're not interested. Of course, there's always the off chance that you'll run into some particularly zealous and clued-in inspector with a fetish for lithium batteries, but realistically I wouldn't worry about it. Also, 90% of the regulation you link to is about transporting ...


12

Promoting a comment to an answer - it's actually really really complicated! There's a reason why even Google can't give you an answer quickly, and why multi-city quotes can take such an age to run.... The best explanation I've come across of why this is, what goes into the complexity, what work there is in finding out the prices etc is given in this ...


87

To calculate the price of a ticket, we first need to know a little about how air pricing works. A ticket is a single, complete contract for one journey. It can contain up to a maximum sixteen flights. Each flight on the ticket must be paid for ("covered") by exactly one fare. A fare is a price that the airline offers on a city-pair, for example, London-New ...


-3

I think cost of tickets depends on many different factors. Also unavailability of tickets complicates your journey where you want to travel. If tickets are available on those dates when you want to fly then you can visit different sites to get specific information of prices of different tickets available.


0

There seems to be a good deal of confusion and indeed incorrect information about how air fares are priced in the "duplicate" question suggested in the comments, so I shall post a new answer to this specific question. Historical fares continue to be published and available in the GDS for information after they expire or are manually deleted for several ...


4

It is ok to dress "like" a stewardess on a flight. That is to say, it is okay to wear a dress or clothing similar to what stewardesses would wear. Now stewardesses also were pins, badges, etc. for identification. These are the items that separate the "real thing" from "counterfeits." Don't wear these accouterments to actually identify yourself as something ...


6

Most major airlines offer what is known as "Unaccompanied Minor" service. You will not see it as a booking option online, as normally you, the parent or guardian, need to call the airline to arrange this. It is an extra fee on top of the airfare. With the service, an airline or airport staff member will accompany the minor from check in to the gate and ...


1

It really depends how well the uniform matches. I have inadvertently looked nearly identical to one of the male cabin attendants, right down to the glasses and (lack of) hair. Passengers were asking me all kinds of questions, and in most cases I knew the answers, so... The real attendant thought it was hilarious. However, in normal lighting no one would ...


8

According to Seatguru and FlySAS, on SAS you're always allowed a carry-on luggage and at least one piece of checked luggage. So yes, you're correct Simple rules. SAS always allows you to take at least one bag (up to 23 kg/51 lbs.) with you, plus one cabin baggage item up to 8 kg/18 lbs. completely free. If you are traveling in SAS Plus or SAS Business, ...


1

There are exceptions caused by bad IT (for example, years ago BA code sharing onto Aer Lingus used to be famous for that) but in general the answer is no. It's also quite unpredictable because those kind of gaps don't really stay around for long. Really air miles are not worth that much, the few extra you would collect from the B-C journey are not worth ...


9

Frequent flyer miles are generally only earned when there's a "butt in seat", to quote the charming term of art from frequent flyer forums. If you don't show up at the gate and get your boarding pass scanned for the flight from B-C, you're going to be recorded as a no-show, and you're not going to get any miles for it either. Also, while hidden-city ...


3

Not really. You can skip the KUL-SIN leg of your inbound flight from MLE, since it's the last leg. However, if you don't show up for SIN-KUL, your KUL-CDG flight will also be cancelled. And no, you will not be allowed to check-in for KUL-CDG directly, precisely because they don't want people to do this kind of thing.


4

Imagine that you manage to sell all those seats 100% of the time. Wouldn't that mean that you're undercharging the market if that were the case? If the supply is meeting the demand perfectly, then it means you're either incredibly lucky, or much more likely it means that you're undercharging the market. Also, there is a second factor. The airline ...


6

Many people buy fully refundable flexible tickets because they are not sure of their travel plans until a day or two (or less) before the flight. Such tickets are about three to four times the price of the cheapest ticket in the same class of travel. If you are going to sell very cheap tickets a few hours before departure, many people holding full flex ...


6

I believe the simple answer is that, pretty much, they let you board as soon as the plane is ready. Almost always when I board a plane, they are rushing to get it ready for boarding. These days everything almost everywhere runs on a very tight schedule. It's that simple. Regarding your experience: "A few years ago, when boarding a Virgin America ...


8

There are several factors going on. Airlines have whole departments dedicated to revenue optimization, and to figure such things out. Among the factors that play a role here: Last minute fliers tend to be in some kind of urgent situation, and thus are more willing to pay higher fares. Airlines already have a contingent of people to fill empty seats: ...


31

There are many things that airlines used to do that they can no longer do because customers have so much more information than before. 30 years ago, what people presented themselves as doing pretty well matched with what they were doing. But over the years, folks have learned (and shared with others) how pretending can save a lot of money: one way ticket ...


3

Your question, if I may say so, is based on some mistaken assumptions. First, Star Alliance is not a price fixing cartel. It exists merely for marketing purposes, and provides a bare minimum of integration between the airlines. Turkish Airlines (TK) and the Lufthansa group (LH) are direct competitors with each other, and moreover they are not on "good ...



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