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116

A cabin crew member here... In general, flight attendants will be happy to give you the extra meal after the service is done, because they know it will be thrown after landing anyway. Out of experience, there are always some extra meals, at least one or two. Sometimes passengers simply do not take a meal, some other times there's just an extra meal or two ...


35

Yes you can ask. And I have successfully asked for extra food in the past (i.e. over the last five years). I also typically ask for two beverages and never had that refused. Of course they have no obligation to give you extra food but on a full service airline they are usually happy to. (Since you mention a first meal I assume you are on a full service ...


14

No, you will not get frequent flier credit if you do not fly. Irrespective of whether you check-in or not. Even if you go on board and then decide not to fly, you will be unloaded from the manifest and will not get credit*. Airlines are required to know exactly who is on board for a multitude of reasons, some of which are regulatory, and some of which are ...


14

The interface is a bit inconvenient and it has a limit on the number of routes shown simultaneously, but you can do it on Kayak's list of airlines. Click on an airline and you'll get a map of where it flies. E.g. a map for Easyjet: You can then filter by a specific city to get a map of which routes are available there, e.g. for Easyjet in Prague:


13

Between the Star Alliance route map, the oneworld route map, and the SkyTeam route map, you can see the vast majority of existing flights. For any given airline, just choose the map corresponding to its alliance. And since most itineraries will have all segments within the same alliance, you probably will need to use only one of these maps.


10

You could try openflights. I'm not sure if the data is complete, but a map for easyjet: And Indigo (India LCC):


8

No, there are no requirements for airlines within the EU to provide free drinking water. I know that it is both common and in some countries even required by law for bars and restaurants to serve tap water for free. If tap water is good enough, I guess that not even Ryanair would have charged you for drinking tap water aboard the plane, but it might not have ...


8

When you board the plane, the ground staff scans your boarding pass, indicating in the computer systems that you've boarded the plane. One obvious consequence of failing to board the the plane is that the airline will remove any luggage you have checked before allowing the plane to depart. Another consequence that may be less obvious, but that we can ...


7

Nothing wrong with asking - treating cabin crew as humans (be nice, be polite, don't stress them if you see they are busy, wait for your turn) will get you a long way. You'd be amazed what is possible. One nice passenger offsets many rude ones - be the nice one!


7

The document you link to references the Airline Tariff Publishing Company. Legacy carriers (as opposed to low cost carriers) file their tariffs, fares, and multitudinous other data with ATPCO where it can be obtained for a not-insignficant fee. If you are looking for airline's conditions of carriage, it would be easier and cheaper to look at the airline's ...


6

You don't need a return ticket, just proof of onward travel. Most commonly this is due to using a return ticket, but another ticket to another country is fine as well.


6

As a general rule of thumb airlines do not ban children from any level of service, they will sell tickets to anyone with the cash. My daughter has flown in business class on several airlines without issue and I have seen plenty of kids in business and first class on all the airlines I fly. There are likely some destinations served where cultures keep ...


5

No. The airline will not hold luggage for you. Not voluntarily anyway. If you failed to pick up your luggage at the airport, they would probably hold if for a few days providing it didn't go missing. It's not a recommended strategy though. Ideally you should look for a left luggage service at the airport or in the city. If you're staying at a hotel in ...


4

Buy two full-fare tickets. They are typically fully refundable. Obviously, check before you purchase. You typically buy directly from the airline. Then, whether she says yes or no, get them refunded and buy something sane. You'll have to pay a small charge, but nothing compared to the fare difference. Or -- and this is cheaper if you are going to just ...


3

The only place children (and minors) cannot be seated is in the exit row. The same goes for anyone physically unable to operate the emergency equipment / exit doors; or is otherwise incapable (for example, there is a language barrier). Other than that, children are allowed on all sections of the aircraft where passengers are allowed. I have personally been ...


3

There are "extra" meals so you can certainly ask. If you are say, a first class passenger, the extra meal will be given to you almost as a matter of course if requested. You have "first dibs" on this (and other) privileges. If you are "coach" class, your request will be granted more often than not. A problem might arise if first class, or other coach ...


2

Exact requirements for a "return/onward" ticket vary depending on your citizenship and the exact circumstances. Technically for a US citizen visiting Canada, no return/onward ticket is needed, however as is always the case the Canadian Immigration official can choose to deny access to the country if they believe you will, for example, not leave the country ...


2

Couple of suggestions: Time of year: If flight date is on/near the start of holiday season or major vacation time, then expect more travelers; if school vacations, more so. Regular airlines vs. charters (for example Air Canada vs. Air Transat): Regular airlines will fly regular routes and will/can fly more often with a less than full plane. Destination: ...


1

Some airlines (United for example) let you see the available seats before you book. That's a fairly decent indicator if it's not too far in the future. Unfortunately plane loading depends on a large number of factors, time of year, week day, holidays/vacation, route popularity and capacity, connecting routes capacity (and changes) and also special events at ...


1

This answer is moved from a question which is being closed as duplicate. There is no excuse for it, bad for environment as people land and take of more often and quite often also travel more land miles to make use of a cheaper airport. But Airlines do it as they can get away from it. I have heard it explain as there is a big difference in costs the ...



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