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1

For me I wait till the very very end so that ideally I'm one of the very last passengers who haven't boarded (and often they have to pester me to board because I'm just sitting near the gate, while everyone else has boarded). This way I can just walk straight in all the way and be seated in the plane, without having to stop for a moment in some painful ...


0

I sometimes board near the end, even if I'm sitting next to the gate, simply to avoid having to stand in queue. I see it as "free priority boarding", where I define priority in terms of time spent standing in queue, not time at which aircraft is entered. This strategy is sometimes thwarted by the presence of a second queue in the aerobridge.


2

(Yes, this is late (he's presumably been to Hong Kong and back by now) but it popped up in the sidebar and no one explained "why") The difference between this: And this: Is that the first one came from your carrier's online booking system and it has to: be adaptable to many aircraft configurations work with almost any browser, even the old ones be ...


2

No. My backpack (that fits under the seat in front of me on a normal airliner) barely fits in the overhead bins on Delta's CRJs, let alone my rollaboard. As others have said, they will collect such bags at the gate, put them in the cargo hold, and then return them to you in the jetway (or on the ramp if you're not using a jetway) as you get off the plane. ...


6

It depends on the size of your rollerboard. The overhead bin allows for a 52.5" × 14" × 9.5" bag, but, if memory serves, Delta makes passengers check all rollerboards on the CRJ-200 since they reserve the overhead space for soft-sided bags and jackets. Given that policy, the seat upgrade wouldn't give you any early boarding advantage so you ...


13

No, a standard 22" rollaboard suitcase won't fit in a CRJ overhead bin. In my experience, most airlines that fly the CRJ and similarly sized regional aircraft use a "gate check" system: luggage that is of "carry-on size" (i.e. would fit in a larger airliner's bin) but doesn't actually fit in the bin on the aircraft in use will be taken from you at the gate, ...


31

It is as a hanger, you can hang your jacket or anything similar there. The same exact ones typically available in lavatories for passengers and in galleys for crew members. In the passengers cabin, they are usually available in first or business classes' seats and it comes with a sign: I guess they forgot to add the sign, making it harder for passenger to ...


35

Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


9

Out of first hand experience with this as a previous cabin crew, sometimes the cabin crew of a flight signal the ground agents about the overhead compartments being full in the middle of the boarding process, so to avoid possible delays if removing excess hand luggage from the cabin is needed, the ground agents will prohibit cabin luggage for the remaining ...


0

I suspect it is to speed up boarding. Stowing and unstowing bags takes a lot of time and they can take up quite a bit of room in the narrow aisles. So they are trying to get as much as possible checked in. There is actually always enough room in cabin for the one bag per person. At worst some can be stowed under seats. So they'll let you take it if you ...


1

I feel the front is dangerous because it may hit the ground first. (Warning: sweeping generalizations ahead) Yes, if the plane lands in Lawn Dart mode. In that case no one gets out in (literally) one piece. Landing accidents often hit tail-first, as the pilot will be trying to pull the plane up. If it's a really good smack on the runway the front ...


3

The safest place is in your seat with your seatbelt fastened. On the rare occasions where something happens to a plane, and some people are hurt and some are not, the ones who are not hurt are in a seat and belted in. This is typically turbulence or rapid descent. Situations where planes actually crash and some people survive are very rare. Attempting to ...


0

Edit: As Kate Gregory's answer says, having your seat belt fastened is probably the most important safety recommendation. Next would be to know where your next exit is and listening to all the safety information given by the crew. That said, contrary to the other answers claims, there may be dependencies on where you sit and fatal crashes where some people ...



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