Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

A frequent traveller I met told me that they will often do this on smaller aircraft. The reason is, that if all the people in the front disembark, the plane will become heavy in the back, and simply tip backwards. I asked him if this happened on larger aircrafts as well, to which he responded that yes, the procedure is the same on larger aircraft. This ...


1

I did transport a desktop computer over an international flight last year. I did not travel throught the United States however (through Canada), so I'm not sure about what the TSA may or may not do. I ended up bubble wrapping it and putting it in my suitcase that I checked in. The cushioning is important. As long as it is cushioned, it should be fine. Just ...


1

No. The only difference over a pure domestic itinerary at the first stage is that there will be a bit of extra time at the check in desk if (a) you have some weird through-check-in problem with a partner airline down route that day and (b) visa/passport checks. The other thing is that the "three hours required" thing is a bit of a myth. In some airports, ...


1

In general if you are traveling on one ticket, with both a domestic leg and an international leg, the international rules override the domestic rules. So when you check in, you are checking in for an "international" flight and the check in counter agents need to document your permission to enter (passport, visa, etc) the international destination. But the ...


4

It's very simple — since you won't be passing through immigration on your outbound leg (assuming an intra-Schengen flight), the first leg you are taking is not international. Same applies for other modes of transport - just because I take a flight to the US after taking the train to the airport doesn't mean it's necessarry to arrive to the train station 3 ...


0

It depends on where you are where you want to go But before that, keep in mind that check-in closes on average 30-40 minutes prior to the flight departure, luggage drop-off one hour before and security will take, in the best-case scenario, 15 minutes. (Although 30-40 is more likely.) You simply can't go through security before you board your flight! ...


4

Minutes. All airlines still sell walk-up tickets, where you simply rock up to the airport and ask "a ticket for the next flight, please", although you will usually pay through the nose for the privilege. In the case of standby tickets, you may not even be able to purchase the ticket until check-in has closed, which may be as little as 30 minutes before ...


0

Amazon ships this item in a Frustration-Free Packaging, and out of personal experience with this specific packaging method, I think it will survive. Make sure to wrap it in protective plastic at the airport to avoid sharp objects from puncturing the packaging, also make sure to put a "fragile" sticker on it as an extra measure just to be sure. From Amazon: ...


13

I suggest you get a travel agent to work this out for you. It will be worth the $100 or so. You and your girlfriend will also need to carry a letter signed by by both parents outlining your travel plans and saying that you give permission for your daughter to travel alone with the other parent. Canadian customs can be especially picky about this when ...


2

It depends on the airline. Online booking systems (at least the three first I tested) usually don't allow separate tickets for children to be booked. Since most airlines require smaller children (e.g. below the age of four) to always be accompanied by an adult, they may or may not also require that the child and the guardian is booked on the same ticket, ...


1

Technically there is no issue with you creating 3 separate itineraries for 3 separate people and flying in any way you see fit. There are restrictions that countries and airlines place when a minor child is flying out of the country of residence/citizenship with only one or no parents with them. You will need a letter from your girlfriend that says that ...


1

People sometimes get things wrong. Rules sometimes exist which have no purpose, either because they used to be valid, or because they are a 'cargo cult', or because it is seen as desirable to enforce some form of authority in certain situations, and it doesn't matter what form that authority takes. People also sometimes find spurious justifications for ...


6

I've heard from informal publications and from crews that there are two reasons. First, the crew needs everyone's undivided attention during takeoff/landing, should things go suddenly wrong. Second, some have said it causes interference, though as a physicist, I highly doubt this is the case. Based on the first answer, I've often wondered why it's okay to ...


27

The ability to leave phones and small electronics turned on is a relatively new privilege with many airlines. And some flight crews still ask travelers to turn them off during take off and landing. During the flight, the captain and the crew under his command are the final authority and can impose additional safety restrictions if they feel them warranted ...


1

Really, this question is so silly! 1) there are indeed any number of cubic cases: they are not popular. it's just that simple. the basic premise of the question is false. As Relaxed pointed out immediately, it's not unlike asking "Why did Obama win the election?" Well - he won because - he got more votes. It's begging the question. 2) the many obvious ...


3

Cheap international air tickets are generally not refundable. You will get some airport taxes back (probably less than 100 USD) minus an administration fee. Alternatively you might get a voucher that you can use towards a future flight on the same airline. It depends on how you buy the ticket. As a rule of thumb a fully refundable ticket will be about ...


3

Because they are too unwieldy when you carry it on your side. And it's easy to exceed the weight limits. I already can cram 23 kg in a single large luggage bag. You can vacuum pack your clothes to make the most of the space in a luggage. Did you want to maximise your luggage space and thought cube shaped luggage might be a solution?


37

Because you only gain 11.7% volume and give up a bunch of other advantages, including making packing worse. The volume of luggage with maximum checked-luggage dimensions (W + L + H <= 62)[1] is 27in x 21in x 14in = 7938in3. The volume of the cube is 20.7in3 = 8869.7in3. Only 11.7% more. If maximizing (packing) volume (inside a large regular space) was ...


3

The other, rather important point is this: While that would indeed give you the maximum volume allowed, packing pretty much anything that fills the maximum volume is likely to take you well, well over weight. It's easy enough to take a bag of a much smaller volume and go over the 18/20/30kg included weight limits. Extra weight gets expensive very fast, and ...


9

Balikbayan boxes, popular among Filipinos for bringing goods home when flying, are indeed quite close to cubic. Standard sizes are: Medium: 18 × 16 × 18 inches Large: 18 × 18 × 24 inches Extra large: 24 × 18 × 24 inches While they are optimized for shipping, they are unwieldy for travel. In addition to issues mentioned in other answers… A cube does ...


3

There is nothing stopping you buying the most square shaped luggage and take it with you. I have seen 'classic' suitcases that are almost square, that used to be transported on ships. They are known, among other names, as cabin trunks. The full size ones will be too big for nowadays flights, but you can get half size replicas and smaller ones. They went ...


3

@Robert points it out, they would be too unwieldy. Although you, as a passenger, would have not to worry about them while being transported by plane, you still would have to get them from your home to the airport. And that's assuming that's the only moving around you'll do. Will they have wheels and a long leash so that you can drag them around behind you? ...


15

A cube would maximise the volume while complying with the 62-inch limit Maybe true from a mathematical point of view, but in reality cube suitcases would be: Harder to carry with a handle, you will have to stretch your arm away from your body, which will make things feel heavier. It will be harder to walk while carrying them. What about long ...


1

Even when they do not measure now, it is likely that they will measure in the future. Are you willing to invest money in a good quality case that you might not be able to use on flights in the future. I have never seen them on the airport scales, but in many places they have little lines (or build in lines) that show the outlines on the maximum sizes. And ...


0

Indian nationals can Transit without Visa via FRA or MUC if holding a valid visa for the destination and a valid Visa for any of the following countries: Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Ireland, Japan, Liechtenstein, Romania, UK and USA (the approval notice I-797 is not valid document for visa free airport transit). via Lufthansa ...


3

I did exactly this - put competition swords in a firearm case and check it as baggage - when travelling through the US, Hong Kong, and China a few years ago. It's completely legal, as long as you aren't violating local weapons laws regarding personal carrying at any point, and isn't a violation of terms of carriage for any airline I'm aware of, as long as ...


1

It's fine, at least as far as the airline is concerned. This situation is very common and airlines are quite used to dealing with it, plus all they care about is whether you will be let into your destination. So: Book your ticket with the name in your Canadian passport. Show the Canadian passport when checking in for your flight. Show your Bahraini ...


3

Is there any rule about using a firearm case for other than firearms? A firearm case without the firearm is just a case. Put anything you want in it. Swords of any description are fine in checked baggage, airport security sees knives, spears, arrows and various other pointy things daily, it won't surprise them at all. and the mini sound system ...


0

For the case itself, I would get a custom made Pelican case (just google it). They are sturdy, safe, lockable, come with foam padding. In any case, contact the airline you wish to travel with and make certain they are aware you will be carrying weapons at the airport and will be checking them in properly. Also be prepared to get at the airport earlier ...


2

It will likely be treated as a weapon, enhanced by the fact that you are packing it in a gun case. Weapons are handled with a bit more care and are delivered at the end point either by hand or at a different baggage claim (often at the oversized claim door).


1

In the process of flying, there are different steps. The first is the booking, but there are others, mostly checking in and boarding. If you want to fly with your friend, when booking a flight, you should make sure you book the same flight (i.e. same day, same time, and usually same flight number). At least you will go to the airport at the same time and ...


5

As an Iranian I'd say most probable explanation is that you've seen gas flares of some oil refineries.


2

You can, from a travel agent or by phone to the airline (or at a ticket desk). However, the "PNRs" [passenger name record---the database record of your journey] will be split anyway so you and your friend will be on separate bookings. It is not possible for a single PNR to contain different flights for different people. The PNRs can be "linked" together so ...


0

No. Information as of 14MAY15 / 2002 UTC National India (IN) /Embarkation USA (US) Transit Austria (AT) /Destination India (IN) ALSO CHECK DESTINATION INFORMATION BELOW Austria (AT) TWOV (Transit Without Visa): Visa required, except for Holders of onward tickets in transit . *Note: TWOV is not possible when arriving from a ...


0

To add to the excellent answers above: you should always bring some food onto the plane in case you get hungry during mid-flight. Some of the common food I seen are bread, sandwiches, and instant noodles (the flight staff should be able to provide hot water).


6

Generally, on long-haul flights food is served shortly after start and then again shortly before landing. As a rule, the higher the class, the closer to takeoff/landing the food will be served. Because there are less people in higher classes, it's faster to go around with the drinks first. The airline usually try to have the longest possible time in which ...


7

As mentioned in an answer to another similar question, the best source for this kind of information is the website of the airline itself. In your case, ANA has a page, where you can choose your route and it will give you the menu for the flight. As it is called 'lunch/dinner', you can probably safely assume that the food will be served not too long after ...


7

Almost always, I find the best approach is "gradual improvement". Almost all the seating changes you need to make can be made most effectively through the airline's own website: Firstly, always check if you can pick your seat as soon as your ticket is booked. Most full-price airlines, typically if you have some frequent-flyer status or a higher-priced ...


-1

+1 means day. eq. If it departs on July 1 at 08:00 and arrives at 20:00 +1. Meaning, that is 20:00 July 02.


20

The issue is that in order to give you a specific seat, they need it to be free. If the better seats are already given away, normally the people who have received a seat have this printed on their (e-) tickets. Moving someone away from their seat because you want it is very tricky. So the best strategy would be to get a better seat in the first place ...


0

It is true that the TSA does not deal with immigration, though it's possible that you will run into some hotshot officer will take it upon himself to give people a hard time about expired visas. Technically, a U.S. visa is only for entry to the U.S.; it has nothing to do with stay in the U.S., so an expired visa or lack of visa does not mean you're illegal, ...


5

To answer the concrete question, how airlines determine who is being malicious and who is actually missing their flight? By frequency. The airlines have IT systems that allow them to statistically track all fliers. They know what happens in 99% of the cases and how frequent cancellations or non-attendance for the second leg are. When someone maliciously, ...


14

What the regulation says is that your friend is entitled to “re-routing, under comparable transport conditions, to their final destination at the earliest opportunity”. Europa.eu and the Commission's Passenger Rights website include similar language (“transport to your final destination using comparable alternative means” and “re-routing to your final ...


6

No. You will need to go through passport control in Paris and enter the Schengen zone, collect your bags, and re-check them in at the EasyJet counter, and exit the Schengen zone again. EasyJet does not have luggage interline agreements with other airlines and will not accept interline baggage from them, even if they are so tagged. EasyJet also enforces ...


6

For the most part, they do not, it is a waste of their resources. Onward travel on the same ticket will likely be voided, although in practise this depends on the IT competence of the airline in question. The airline may cancel your frequent flier account if you do it very frequently. In the United States, some airlines threaten to recover the fare ...


3

It's definitely not obligatory as far as Schengen regulations are concerned, which is why they can't explicitly demand it and only recommend one. Beyond that, you need to establish two things: that you have a valid purpose (that's where the itinerary comes in) and that you have the means to leave the Schengen area (that's why a reservation might be useful). ...


3

According to some recent articles on domestic flight identification, it seems that the move is toward TSA-approved identification: http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/acceptable-ids "Foreign government-issued passport" is one of them; like Michael stated, they likely won't check your visa page. However, it looks like a college ID won't be valid for the ...


1

In booking another transatlantic flight with British Airways, there online system is more informative. It says If you don't pay to choose your seats, British Airways will allocate seats to passengers travelling with children (aged 2-11 years) approximately three days before departure. We aim to seat families together; however where this is not possible ...


2

From the looks of it, they probably want you to have an idea of where you're going, whether it's within the Schengen area or not, whether you need a particular visa, etc. More than likely it's to prevent someone from spending a lot of money for a plane ticket that may not be used (if the visa is rejected). Have a particular flight and/or date in mind, just ...


3

Short answer: it's ok to book through Expedia/Orbitz as long as the airline is the operating airline, and you have to call the right airline. For example, if you book the British Airways's ticket on Expedia, and they're the marketing as well as operating airline for this flight, you will have no problem calling British Airways to add the bassinet request to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included