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3

The Wikipedia page for the Tbilisi airport lists the airlines with flights to Tbilisi. Looks like your best Western Europe options are Rome, Amsterdam, Paris (seasonal) and Munich. There are other flights from Eastern Europe. If you're looking to get in cheap, Wizz Air (a discount airline) serves Kutaisi from various locations in Eastern Europe.


2

I've never heard of having to show a credit card at check-in, and it makes no sense at all for an airline to require that. OK, after some research it looks like my experience is not representative and some airlines routinely require the credit card, mainly in Asia. Presumably to guard against credit card fraud. But this depends on the airline, not the ...


7

The most obvious answer is that not everyone checks luggage. I go to the counter maybe 10% of the time that I fly, as I very rarely have bags to check. Even if you are checking bags, the online check-in system allows much of the process to be completed before you arrive to drop off your bags. Depending on the airline and the flight, that could include ...


11

Assuming a maximum luggage allowance of 20kg, and that the weight of 1m EUR is about 2kg. Then we are talking about 10 million Euros. :D Of course that is assuming that you are too poor to pay for extra allowance.


7

Apart of regulations mentioned by drat, EU also has anti-money laundering laws. They apply regardless if you travel internationally or not. The EU directive 2005/60/EC "on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purpose of money laundering and terrorist financing" tries to prevent such crime by requiring banks, real estate agents ...


13

There seems to be no limit as such. However if you carry more than 10'000 €, you might have to declare it depending on the country. For example in Germany, you are to declare it when orally asked to do so. For the UK on the other hand, there seems to be no need to do so. So if you consider taking more than 10'000 €, you should check the rules for the ...


5

You can re-enter the US if you have proof of citizenship, so that doesn't strictly require a passport -- although it may make your enter procedure more troublesome. As mentioned above, you can theoretically travel to US territories without a passport, from answers.usa.gov: For Travel to/from/between U.S. Territories, U.S. Citizens and Nationals: ...


8

Three are two main factors for the difference between the two flights you've listed. The first is the overhead of take-off, climb, decent and landing. These will be roughly equivalent for all flights, so are basically a fixed overhead. For the two flights you've listed, the times you've given are those published by the airline and thus include the time ...


17

Mark already explained the why, but there's a simple but rather accurate simple approximation for jet flights: 30 min plus 1 hr per 500 mi flown Consider LAX-ABQ: 0:30 + (670/500) = 0:30 + 1:20 = 1:50 And ORD-SJC: 0:30 + (1859/500) = 0:30 + 3:43 = 4:13 The logic behind this is basically that, while take off and landing take around 20 min each, ...


12

A lot of the time in travel is the initial takeoff and climbing to altitude, as well as the descent, queueing and slowdown at the end. During this time you're not actually travelling that far, but it uses up time. Every flight has this component, and let's say for argument's sake it takes 20 minutes at the start and 20 minutes at the end. Then the rest of ...


3

My usual rule of thumb is that one mile is worth about one cent, based on the figure that 25,000 miles buys one restricted domestic round-trip which can usually be found for around $250 on the open market. One should probably discount the miles further compared to cash, since they can only be spent on one thing, can't earn interest, and can expire (as you ...


8

Actually some airlines still do that. Air New Zealand hands out sweets/lollies (to adults and children), and I've seen it on some other airlines too in recent years - but can't remember the names off hand. There are SOME technological advancements - the 787 and A380 are meant to be better for jetlag and certainly the 787 has higher air pressure leading to ...


3

Firstly, go and read this answer to understand the difference between a "layover" and a "stopover". For international flights, breaks between flights of up to 24 hours are generally considered layovers (although the exact rules vary from airline to airline), and thus are generally not charged extra. Anything over 24 hours in a location is a stop-over, and ...


2

This is called a stopover and should be no problem. You might need to pay a little more or use more expensive fares to be able to do it. Concretely, if you are not going through a travel agent, you need to book your travel as a “multi-city” trip on the airline's website. If you book it that way (and not as several one-way trips), it will be a single ticket, ...


1

Although I found all of the other answers helpful, I was hoping for something a little more quantitative so I did some googling. I found this article by Lightspeed Aviation to be extremely informative. It is intended for non-career pilots of single engine aircraft, but the principles are the same. They show some typical noise spectra of single engine ...


1

Etihad has Conditions of carriage listed that you agree to by buying a ticket. Section "15.2 BAGGAGE" states the maximum values of claims that can be done, please refer to this section for the amount that you can claim. The "8.8 COLLECTION AND DELIVERY OF CHECKED BAGGAGE" section states that: 8.8.2 Only the bearer of the Baggage Check and Baggage ...


2

I really like my on-ear Bose Quietcomfort 3 headphones- they significantly reduce the noise in an aircraft. I found some of the other ones created their own high-pitched hiss which bothered me more than the aircraft noise. The data says 136gm, but they actually weight about 200grams with cable and charger (rechargeable batteries last more than 20 hours and ...


2

In short, chartering planes is almost never cheaper than flying commercially. Even in Andra's case, chartering was only "cheaper" because they were apparently in a blazing hurry; if waiting around for a day or two had been an option, they could almost certainly have found a cheaper option, or made the 700 km trek by bus or something. I once looked fairly ...


3

I've always been suspect of the efficacy of high-priced noise-cancelling headphones, and recently picked up a pack of Hearos foam earplugs. Best $6.45 I've ever spent before air travel. The engine roar fades to a gentle hum, and in-flight disruptions such as seatmate chatter and cabin announcements are rendered nearly incomprehensibly quiet.


1

A new service called Airpooler lets you pay the price of the fuel, since it's not an officially licensed charter service, you can't be charged more, and are essentially 'hitching'. It's small scale for now, but may well grow.


1

According to Visa Waiver Program Wikipedia page (I assume you can join the Visa Waiver Program) Passport validity The standard requirement for passport validity is 6 months beyond the expected date of departure from the United States. However, the US has signed agreements with a number of countries to waive this requirement. [107]


1

A while back I bought a cheap (around 16 euros, panasonic) in-ear headphones with active noise canceling in order to use them at work. They are great to cancel constant noises like the one from the air conditioning, much less to cancel my workmates chat. I haven't actually tried them on a plane but I expect them to work against the engine. 16 euros are worth ...


12

As far as I'm aware, at time of writing the only airlines that currently operate both the 787 and the A380 are British Airways and China Southern Airlines, although Etihad will be joining this rather exclusive club by the end of the year, and Korean Air, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Atlantic have all placed firm orders for both. That said, the obvious ...


7

Every airline will have its own policies, so contact your airline and ask. Airlines regularly transport all sorts of weird creatures, up to and including a herd of elephants, so they'll be happy to advise you how to deal with a tarantula.


2

Personally, I've never seen airlines reject (or charge more) for a bag being slightly too tall. They only check the weight and move on. Now, if your checked baggage is obviously much too long (eg. skis) then your item will have to go to the special handling area. I've travelled in North America, Mexico, Europe, the UK, and South-East Asia if that helps at ...


1

You will arrive and depart in Terminal 2 which was specifically designed for short transfer times down to 30 min. There are even extra cars which take you directly from plane to plane (via security) if needed, see: http://www.munich-airport.de/en/consumer/aufenthalt_trans/airportstop/minconntime/hcc/index.jsp Most likely you will arrive in Terminal 2, ...


4

It'll depend where you're flying, what type of flight (multi-leg etc), how busy the season is, and how far ahead of time you're booking. The tighter the time frame or higher the demand, the harder it is. Of course, the Flightfox hackers until a few months ago were all experts/hobbyists/searchers and you could get a dozen people all trying to beat your ...


0

as Ivan said did you book both flights together because as specified in an other post and also on this website if it is not the case then it becomes your problem and you won't have any right to pretend to any kind of compensation: My connecting flights were booked separately. If my first flight is cancelled am I entitled to a refund for my other ...


3

The legality of asking for personal information when setting up an online account varies greatly by location, and is not the least bit related to travel. In the US, for instance, it is legal to ask such information--provided the person answering the questions is at least 13 years of age, or has parental consent. In Canada, my understanding is, it is ...


0

Flying from Boston via Reykjavík with Icelandair will cost you about 1500 dollars, if you stay a couple of extra nights and fly home on July 7th it is around 1300 dollars. Icelandair also flies out of New York but I didn't look at the prices there.


1

It's most likely because of the number of flights out of Detroit. If budget is a bigger concern then time, you can probably book DTW-YYZ, then use a charter like Air Transat or Canadian Affair. You'll probably get there for ~$1k. Bonus if the USD is still 10% stronger than the Canadian :-)


1

If you were willing to drive the 4 hours to YYZ (Toronto) you can get one stop for $13xx USD or so, but nonstop flights are still pretty pricey. It's definitely high season. At least the airport is on the favorable side of the city for someone coming from Detroit.


5

I think the answer is the 4th of july. If you check for airfares to Frankfurt, Manchester, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, or even Tokyo. You'll see the same pattern, of sudden high fares in that period. Americans apparently like to leave the country during their independence day. Check one week before and one week later and suddenly the prices are lower.


0

Flight Stats can be helpful, too. If you register you can click through to Event Timeline, where most airlines will post the assigned tail number. You can also see if the tail number changes which is really helpful during protracted delays. Here is a flight that got redirected today to SJC (San Jose, CA) from SFO (San Francisco, CA), probably because of the ...


4

Don't you hate that? ;) Sadly, no, if you miss a leg of a flight at any point on a ticket, they'll cancel ALL other legs of the flight. So unless you can get yourself to Allentown, you are unable to take that flight. It's for various reasons, logistics, regional pricing, airport taxes, but basically, no, you can't. Similar question here, with the same ...


13

In short, no, he can't realistically bring them on board: under TSA rules, semi-solid foods are considered "gels" and thus fall under the "liquids, aerosols and gels" restriction of 3 bottles x 100 ml max, and these rules are applied worldwide on international flights. You could still probably bring a few tiny containers of curry and something dry to eat ...


2

Boston Logan is one of the most efficient airports I have flown in and out of. It is also a huge airport. From my experience, if you don't require assistance, I reckon you be at the airport at least an hour before your flight departs.


1

You'll manage it, otherwise Lufthansa wouldn't have offered the connection. Since yours is a long-flight from Mumbai to Munich, there is a chance that you come earlier, and in reality you have 1 h. The only caveat is that from my personal experience, your checked-in luggage possibly won't manage to catch the next plane. Missing baggage after connected ...


2

If the booking system offered the connection, it is doable. Also, if I remember correctly, LH is using the same terminal for all their flights, so you would not have to change terminal. The connection is tight, and there are chances that you won't make it. You will then be automatically booked on the next available flight. If the baggage makes it but you ...


6

First, your baggage will be checked through, and if you miss the connection, Lufthansa will put you on a later flight at no extra cost. Since you arrive early and there are many flights between Munich and Paris, it will probably be only an hour or two later. You will have to go through immigration and possibly security, but at 6 AM there probably won't be ...


0

I was one of the flight experts on flightfox when it was contest-based last summer. Just didn't have time to do it anymore. In the era of priceline, kayak, cheapoair, itamatrix, etc, searching for airfare online is much easier than before. If the journey is simple (e.g. roundtrip without any constraints), then simple search in one of these sites will result ...


2

You can leave the airport and go to Reykjavik or Blue Lagoon. It takes 40 min to drive to Reykjavik. For information about stopover in Iceland you can check this Iceland Air page and video


2

The wikipedia page on the subject doesn't offer a lot of detail, but does provide some clues to the answer to your question. In short, engaging in sexual activities in front of other passengers is going to be illegal in most jurisdictions, and against airline policies in practically all cases. Engaging in sexual activity aboard a plane in private, such as ...


3

I worked for Fedex until 2002, and up until September 11, employees could travel on the jumpseats of company planes. This was only available to employees, and not to friends or family, so when I was single, I traveled quite a bit, even getting to Japan and Hong Kong for free. Seats were available first come, first served, and at any time you could be ...


3

I think there's probably not much you can do: If you have a mobile phone, you can always try to contact someone, but it seems the chances of having network coverage are rather slim. You could hope that whoever took over the plane forgot to shut down the in-flight phones and call somebody with those. Your chances of disturbing the pilot when he is in the ...


0

Right now, things at Moscow airports are pretty much normal. If I was going to fly there a week from now, I wouldn't worry too much. A month from now, all bets are off. As long as the economic sanctions against Russia remain nominal, targeting only a few key personnel, the situation should remain normal for the rest of us. However, if Russia doesn't give in ...


15

First, I believe you are overreacting to the current situation, all I'm aware of is the disappearance of flight MH370, and I believe that will eventually prove to have a tragic but non-malicious explanation, with an accident, heroic pilots (and maybe a touch of government bureaucratic incompetency thrown-in during the search, not that it would have probably ...


1

@Mark Mayo is quite right in his opinion - Aeroflot isn't involved into politic conflict, and, as your route isn't connected with Ukraine, you should not get any problems there. As soon as I understand, you'll even not leave the Transit zone, so all your time in Sheremetyevo you'll be in safe zone with not much attention from others. Security checks can be ...


8

There should be no problems, unless you're on a Ukrainian passport, according to the Russian in my team here. Even then it should be fine, you may just experience some questions on your reason for your trip. Of course, as you're just continuing on to Europe, you're going to get very little attention. In terms of the city, it's far from Ukraine and the ...


2

The airlines track the number of on time departures (and arrivals). It is a key metric both within management and to some of the public picking an airline. One way to increase the chances of an on time departure is to get everyone to the gate earlier than really needed. Arriving on time is closely related to departing on time because at busy airports ...



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