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2

It may be next to impossible to find the flight plan and the aircraft registration for that date. However, there is a limited number of aircraft that it could be since KLM operated only 3 747-300s. The list is: N4548M PH-BUW N4551N


3

Recall that my itinerary is: MAA -- FRA -- YUL -- YYZ and that I would like to break my journey at YUL. Here is the only relevant detail I figured out subsequently: Irrespective of my final destination, I will have to clear customs and go through immigration checks at the point of entry as far as Canada is concerned. In particular, being a student, I ...


15

There are two different things in aviation business: Flight Availability You can know if the flight has a seat for you to be booked. You can simply know this by visiting any flight booking site, for example: Kayak.com. Seat Availability This is to know how many seats are available in a given flight for each class, this information is usually available ...


1

As I mentioned on the answer to What if one family member doesn't have a photo ID for domestic air travel in India?, According to the airlines charters for Air India and Jet Airways, as long as you have a government issued photo ID (CBSE will be included in this case as it is on of the major Central Boards for education in India), you should be able to ...


17

As far as I know it's not possible for free, but you can buy a subscription to a tool like KVS that can look up availability on any flight: The numbers in the "Availability" column represent free seats in each fare class: in this case, Business class (buckets J C D) on LH401 is wide open (9 or more seats), while the same flight codeshared as UA8840 has ...


2

Choosing where to sit based on which location is safer requires that you also know, in advance, what kind of accident you are going to have (if you can do this, take the next (not this) flight to Vegas). Yes, if you fly into a mountain the front rows hit first but it's not like the back rows are going to walk away. Cabin fires can start anywhere. If the ...


4

Aircraft accidents are rare enough that the statistics aren't really meaningful but people have studied it. Assuming on the ground incidents, which are most likely to be survivable - as opposed to flying into mountains. 1, Front of the plane is most likely to hit something, a runway obstruction/another plane - but the pilots are there and so try and steer ...


0

I recently measured the overhead bins of the Embraer 145 and the CRJ 100 because I got tired of gate checking bags. I found a bag that is 19" tall, 13" wide and 7" deep. I took it on a 5 day trip recently on which I flew YVR-SFO-ORD-ICT-YQT-YYZ-YVR on several different small regionals including a Dash-8 100 and it fit into every bin- no gate checks req'd.


0

I've used http://skyscanner.ie a number of times for flights to and from Malawi. Usually I end up flying Ethiopian, which has a stopover in Heathrow or Frankfurt - return should be ~€800 (although it's far far more at busier times of the year).


3

To transit US you will need a Visa see a question that covers that topic: Do I need a US visa to change planes in an American airport? If you're looking for alternatives you may be hard pressed to find them but you could try changing your itinerary to: Dubai -> Moscow -> Havana -> Grand Cayman This avoids the US and to the best of the information I ...


2

There is no such thing as transiting, as it is known in other localities and related to VISA's, within the US. You must go through US Customs and Border Protection, or its representatives, any time you deplane in the US. So, if you stick with your flight plan, to include the layovers in NYC/Miami, yes, you would need a VISA. (India is not currently in the ...


4

Recently, a Dutch guy reached it to the national newspapers, with is hobby of searching low cost flight tickets. Apparently, he manages to get a lot of discounts, and collect frequent flyer passes with many airliners. For example: I found a ticket from Paris for only 7 euros 50 It was a mistake of the airline, but I was going for a song in Asia. He ...


1

If you have TB's of data and haven't backed them up, then you have too much data or not enough TB's (for the backup). That data is already at risk, which is your choice! So as Paul mentioned, re-wrap them. But I suggest going further than "a bit of bubble wrap". All HD's come in commercial packing, and shipping companies here don't honor those ...


11

Turns out, it is now possible, thanks to a post I found on Wikivoyage. A sample itinerary, that they provide, beginning in London: London to Barcelona on Vueling Barcelona to Casablanca on Vueling Casablanca to Istanbul on Air Arabia Maroc Istanbul to Dubai on Flydubai Dubai to Kathmandu on Flydubai Kathmandu to Kuala Lumpur on Air Asia X ...


9

For the minimal volume is too loud problem any headphones with an inline analog volume adjuster will work. Basically these allow you to control the volume between zero (or close) and whatever the input level is. You can also get adapters that do this, here's the first one I found: http://www.amazon.com/Koss-155954-VC20-Volume-Control/dp/B00001P4XH Note -- ...


3

I flew from SYD to SCL at the start of last year (Jan 2013) specifically to go on a 20-day Antarctica cruise. We got as far south as just shy of 65 degrees on the cruise. On the flight back (Qantas QF28) from SCL to SYD we got so far south that I was able to take some photos of tabular icebergs from the aircraft. Around the same time I managed to grab one ...


5

Hard drives are well known to security - they won't be bothered by it at all. The external cases mentioned elsewhere will make it look more normal, but an anti-static bag will not pose any problems. However: Obviously hard-drives are really sensitive to movement and could break easily if wrongly handled. is not entirely true. Running drives don't like ...


12

I've traveled with hard disks in the past, both enclosed and unenclosed ones. I've never had a single issue with enclosed hard drives - nearly everyone seems to know what they are and understand that they pose no security hazard. The only time I've been stopped was by an elderly gentleman manning the security at JFK. He had difficulty understanding what it ...


15

I have done this a couple of times until two years ago - within Europe only though. And while it was never I problem, I always had to show the HDD separately etc - and in the last case was recommended (by security staff at Birmingham (BHX) airport) to buy a cheap (€15) external case, pop the HDD in that and less questions (if any) would be asked. I have ...


2

British Airways was asked (admittedly a while back), and while they don't ban it, they did say it was: "not something we would actively encourage" (source) I haven't seen a more recent source yet :/


3

The 'Child Safety' page has some information on this. Mostly it says that child safety restraint systems (CRS) get approved for traffic and/or airline use by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but that FAA does not control all of the approvals. And stresses to check that the CRS has the label: This restraint is certified for use in motor ...


1

CARES Child Aviation Restraint System is designed specifically for aviation use for children age 1 and older who weigh between 22 and 44 pounds. These youngsters are old enough to be in their own seats, but are too small for the seat belt alone to protect them and provide the safety they require during airplane travel. Their bodies cannot ...


16

It would appear not, but there's nothing stopping us from creating one. People can edit the answer as we find more. Airlines that ban the Knee Defender Air Canada source American Airlines source Continental Airlines source Delta Airlines source Jetstar source Qantas source Southwest Airlines source United Airlines source Jetstar source Virgin Australia ...


27

Such a list would not be meaningful. All airlines have wide rules to prohibit "tampering" with seats, with Knee Defenders or otherwise; you can improvise one with a well-sized bottle, after all. Those that point out the Knee Defender as banned are only making it explicit that this specific device is not allowed. More to the point, if the passenger unable ...


7

Your ability to be compensated depends a bit on the situation, in particular were there other passengers 'abandoned' or was it just you and your wife? If there were multiple persons left behind due to incompetence or a lack of communication, then you have a chance. But if it was just the two of you, Iberia will be able to claim that others reboarded and ...


6

Then you have a problem. According to TSA: Q. Can I fly with an expired ID? A. If you lose your primary ID or it has expired, TSA may accept other forms of ID to help verify your identity. So if you have to obtain a driver's license to replace your expired one which for Washington DC, Virginia, or Maryland you will be required to provide proof ...


1

Just as a note for future travels, as far as I remember beside of the problem with the battery in the luggage you might face a second problem: Electronic devices in your carry on must be able to be turned on for inspection. They will not ask for this every time, but it can happen, and happened to me already several times. You will have a hard time turning ...


1

There is one additional reason your approach may not only lead to your battery being confiscated, but now your laptop being confiscated. As specified in this article, all electronic devices carried in carry-on luggage must be fully charged and functional. If it does not turn on, it may be confiscated prior to boarding. There are now concerns that ...


3

Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2014 states (emphasis ...


1

I've researched the regulations since then, and it seems that some airlines/airports do not allow you to pack "spare" lithium batteries in your checked in luggage. This leaves us wondering what exactly the definition of "spare" is, as this was not really a spare battery; we just separated it from the laptop temporarily for traveling. A "spare" battery ...


0

It seems that quite recently explosives have been developed that cannot be distinguished from a battery on an X-ray. On the other hand, they are easily distinguished from a battery by the fact that your laptop doesn't work with one of these inside your laptop instead of a battery. That's why you will find that you can be asked to prove that your laptop is ...


4

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


5

As was explained in the comments: The way that all the airline booking systems work, it is not possible to have people on different booking (fare) classes on the same ticket. If you have two people on the same flights in the same booking classes, it's fine. If you have two people on the same flights but different booking classes (could be business and ...


12

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


1

For me I wait till the very very end so that ideally I'm one of the very last passengers who haven't boarded (and often they have to pester me to board because I'm just sitting near the gate, while everyone else has boarded). This way I can just walk straight in all the way and be seated in the plane, without having to stop for a moment in some painful ...


3

Assuming you have no further flights on the same ticket (like the return) you can get off anywhere you want. The airline will cancel all future flights on that ticket. Your checked suitcase will probably end up on a Toronto baggage carousel, going round and round and eventually feeling quite rejected. It will eventually get picked up by airport security for ...


0

I sometimes board near the end, even if I'm sitting next to the gate, simply to avoid having to stand in queue. I see it as "free priority boarding", where I define priority in terms of time spent standing in queue, not time at which aircraft is entered. This strategy is sometimes thwarted by the presence of a second queue in the aerobridge.


8

On the page for excess baggage charges there's a separate section For seamen traveling within Europe which strongly suggests that's what your "Marine" refers to - a seaman.


1

It is imperative that you BOOK EARLY TO GET FOUR SEATS TOGETHER. Put all other considerations aside. There're no "good" seats in that plane, no difference. As soon as you see this, SELECT YOUR SEATS so that you get four together. It is very likely that you will get caught out by this new crap where the airlines will magically require you to pay a few ...


4

After checking the seat layout provided in @pnuts's answer... Bad news No good seats to fit your exact needs, I was thinking of the bulkhead seats, but it seems in this particular airplane for this particular airline the bulkhead seats have "restricted leg room", which is not the case in many other airlines, as they add few extra inches to the leg room in ...


2

It really depends on how the "ticket" is provided to you but assuming it is an airline printed ticket rather than an e-Ticket; A lot of tickets have AGT/REF endorsements which means any refund must go back to the purchaser via the agent. However, instead of a refund, you could ask the airline to re-issue your lower class ticket and issue the difference in ...


0

Take your pick. Other than avoiding those in yellow or red they all look "much of a muchness" (as is the nature of mass markets!) You might not be allowed or at least not welcome in the Emergency Exit rows for safety reasons, though they may provide a little extra room for fractious children - and if they are noisy at least complaints from those sitting ...


0

Even if you can't get the money, you can almost surely opt to sit in economy seating. Just get to the boarding area early and inform them you'd rather be seated in economy, and I'm sure they'll be happy to open up another seat they can charge somebody else a fee to "upgrade" to.


2

No. My backpack (that fits under the seat in front of me on a normal airliner) barely fits in the overhead bins on Delta's CRJs, let alone my rollaboard. As others have said, they will collect such bags at the gate, put them in the cargo hold, and then return them to you in the jetway (or on the ramp if you're not using a jetway) as you get off the plane. ...


6

It depends on the size of your rollerboard. The overhead bin allows for a 52.5" × 14" × 9.5" bag, but, if memory serves, Delta makes passengers check all rollerboards on the CRJ-200 since they reserve the overhead space for soft-sided bags and jackets. Given that policy, the seat upgrade wouldn't give you any early boarding advantage so you ...


14

No, a standard 22" rollaboard suitcase won't fit in a CRJ overhead bin. In my experience, most airlines that fly the CRJ and similarly sized regional aircraft use a "gate check" system: luggage that is of "carry-on size" (i.e. would fit in a larger airliner's bin) but doesn't actually fit in the bin on the aircraft in use will be taken from you at the gate, ...


2

Summary Your scheme is absolutely, definitely, 100% impossible, because: any excess amount refunded must and can only go to the purchasor, the rich relative. So that's that. Note however that regarding the first-explained aspect of your Caper, the answer is positively yes. A primary reason (rich!) people give 1st class tickets as presents is that they are ...


0

Yes you can, but it's almost never a good idea, so you have to have a really good reason to try it. Here are the problems As Vagish pointed out, if there is any delay on your incoming flight, you will miss your connection and the second air line will treat this as your fault. Most will charge you a change fee plus potentially any difference in ticket ...


4

But you feel like this is either a waste of money It's a) not your money, b) already spent , c) the airlines need the cash. or you're petite and don't like the larger seats Walk into economy, find someone you like the looks of, trade seats. If you want to be cruel, find a mother with an infant. or you want to minimize your carbon footprint, ...



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