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8

Short answer: if both flights have the same flight number, you are probably staying on the same plane. If the flight number changes, you are connecting to a different aircraft. Alternate answer: if the airline told you what city you are changing in and told you what time you land and take off in that city, you are connecting to a different aircraft. In the ...


5

No, most airlines would not allow you to check baggage to B in this circumstance. One exception... if B->C is domestic you might HAVE to take your luggage off at B to clear customs. (For example if you're talking about LHR-JFK-LAX you will get your luggage at JFK even if it's "checked" to LAX) In some circumstances, airlines might allow you to book a ...


4

You can certainly argue for some, both objective and subjective. for exiting in an emergency, aside from sitting in the exit row, aisle seats > middle seats > window seats for ease to escape for exiting the plane, it's faster than a window seat in the same row if you want to be 'that guy', on airlines like RyanAir where it's sit where you want seating, ...


5

You have the moral advantage when fighting for the armrest. The person on the aisle or window has at least one uncontested armrest already. There's a slightly higher chance that the seat in front of you and/or behind you will be unoccupied. If in front, you don't have to worry about them putting their chair back. If behind, then you don't have to worry ...


2

The only advantage I can think of is the opportunity to have two neighbors to talk to. This can also be a disadvantage if you're particularly anti-social, or you end up with bad neighbors. Which I guess goes to show why this question really is "Primarily Opinion Based."


1

I believe if I book online and travelling to another Schengen country, I would not need to show ID and only the boarding ticket? That depends on the airline's policy (and to some degree, the gate agent's knowledge of that policy). The EU no longer requires that airlines check for their passengers' identification so long as they do not check in luggage. ...


0

It appears that you must have a valid passport to enter Mexico, see e.g. the following links: Mexican Consulate in San Francisco, http://consulmex.sre.gob.mx/sanfrancisco/index.php/visas-traveling-to-mexico Effective March 1st 2010, all US Citizens are required to present U. S. Passport or U.S. Passport Card when entering Mexico (traveling by air, ...


1

In Spain, you are required to carry your ID at all times: http://www.rondatoday.com/carrying-id-when-living-in-spain/ So I would advise not to travel to Spain without an official ID document.


5

KLM is likely not tell you much in their reply, other than telling you to go online or call, as availability changes from minute to minute and what they show now is likely to be different when you email them back later. Your best bet is to log into your current booking and use the change the flight options. You will be able to bail out before any change is ...


2

Most air travel websites do not look for a “connection” in the same way than mapping apps look for an itinerary on the road or train search engines look for train connections. They look for a connection that can be priced and booked (either directly or through a third party or travel agent). This adds a lot of complexity and many non-trivial constraints that ...


5

The basic problem here is threefold: you're traveling at a very busy time of year (between Christmas and New Year), you're asking for a one-way flight (almost always proportionally much more expensive than a return), and the kicker, you're asking for a guaranteed connection, which is all flight search engines will ever return you; otherwise they can't sell ...


2

There is a lot about this here. In summary, onboard telephones are of a design/spec/performance that is compatible with avionics, whereas some of the portable electronic equipment owned by the general public may not be as safe. Some passengers do appreciate communications contact while in the air so some airlines/aircraft cater to their wishes by ...


3

Hopefully these will help you. Flying is by far the safest way to get around, so you should try to calm yourself and enjoy the experience! Airbus A320: Wifi - yes, above 10,000 ft. Power socket - No. CRJ 700: WiFi - No Power socket - No Q400: WiFi - No Power socket - No 737-900: WiFi - No Power socket - Yes (but its shared) For cell phones, ...


2

I am happy to report that Emirates has provided us (Vayama) with authorization to honor ALL bookings that were impacted by this situation at the original fare quoted. We are currently in the process of contacting all impacted customers by phone or email to advise them. If any of you on this OP were impacted, please give Vayama Customer Support a call at ...


1

There is not such "rule" in the airline industry. It really depends of the airline's policy and the destination flights. Other than that, weekdays are usually busier as more people fly and there's always a huge demand for tickets. Less travelers decide to buy last minute ticket during the weekends, for example. The airfare goes down during the weekends to ...


1

Well, if the airlines change their policies, remove restrictions and make the tickets transferable, this would create a whole new market niche for resellers. If this happen there would be many complications related to liability of the resellers, quality guarantees, safety rules and more. It would be virtually impossible for the airlines to operate within the ...


1

Your first three questions are extremely opinion oriented and we all have difference values when it comes to comfort, how flights are, how helpful people are. And all of these can change from day to day, plane to plane, airport to airport. Is there wifi, yes for the A320, likely but not 100% of all 737-900, nope for the other two. Can you use laptop, yes. ...


1

Quite apart from there not being many (if any) discount fares to be had at such short notice at the airport, asking for a random next flight out with seats available is likely going to ring some alarm bells and get airport security (and possibly police) called in while you're asked to wait "while we check what we have available". What's the most likely ...


3

It is impossible for anyone to accurately answer the question without seeing your mother. The rules are based on how well she fits in the seat in question and whether the seat belt fits her. United rules are spelled out on: http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/specialneeds/customersize/default.aspx But the two biggest factors, can she fit into ...


8

Airlines tend to charge full fare for last minute bookings, rather than discounting it to try and fill one more seat. The stereotypical last minute booking is from a business person, who has to be there and is flying on someone else's dime, hence doesn't mind paying whatever is asked. So there is no real motivation to discount the fares. The number of ...


11

You asked Why should the airline care if I depart on Tuesday and return Thursday of the same week, or the next week? and you answered: because business travelers will pay more. That's all there is to it. It's called price discrimination and it's practiced by just about any business that can get away with it -- all the more so in competitive ...


0

When I understand correctly, what happened was the following: You ordered simultaneously via different agents multiple seats on the same aircraft. For sake of example, let's say you ordered 5. But there were only four seats of that fare class available. And vayama was the laziest of your agents, and now you blame vayama for not getting you a cheap seat. But ...


7

One major drawback with using third party booking websites (especially for air) is that there is a time lag between when they queried the airline reservation system and when your booking request is submitted. During this time lag, the seat could be sold, the airline could load new fares, etc. When you search for fares, the airline systems return what is ...


3

Vayama is part of a big group of interlinked international travel companies, mainly based in the Netherlands In America they trade as vayama, but from the about us page of there website it is a brand name for Travix international, part of another bigger group. Bcd international http://www.vayama.com/aboutus?s=307570705 However the usa part of the ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


2

I realize there's already an accepted answer about "yield management" but, while their price discrimination strategy certainly exacerbates their rationale, I think that misses the point. I think the bigger reason is quite simply that they can get away with it. Let me expand on that. When most people book an airline ticket it's because they're planning to ...


2

Another dual-citizen Kiwi here. Our government actually has pages on this, and whilst it's fine for you to travel on either passport, it's best to enter NZ when you return on your NZ passport - otherwise you're not technically a resident, and would have to have a visa and so on. The relevant links: NZ Citizen travelling on a foreign passport I hold 2 ...


1

If you are traveling with Emirates, check at their transfer desk - they will arrange the visa for you. Otherwise, for 12 hour transit you can get a transit visa at the counter right before immigration, and visit the city. However, you may not even need a visa depending on your nationality. It is best to check with the UAE immigration. Emirates provides a ...


1

Another reason might be that airlines tend to overbook planes, if they can. They expect a certain percentage of passengers to cancel their flight and want to prevent empty seats. If everyone found a replacement, there would not be enough seats on the plane for everyone!


2

As others have noted, the chances of contracting Ebola in India are so close to zero that they are literally not worth worrying about. Even closer to zero if you practice hygiene precautions at a paranoid level already, as you suggest that you do. There are worse places to be overall-health-wise than India, I suspect. I've visited LA, New Delhi and ...


3

Based on your comment you should be scared to go back home because if i compare to current situation, India don't have a Ebola case yet but USA have. Jokes apart i think you are safe to go to Delhi, Just make sure you drink packaged drinking water and you should be fine. Stay and eat in any 5 star hotel if you don't like local food and its hygiene.


0

I am currently in Hyderabad,India (making some business) and it is quite safe here related with Ebola. Less secure currently is in USA and EU.


3

According to the latest news there no problems reported with Ebola in India. There are only a few cases outside of the African continent itself, e.g. in Spain and the United States, but not in India.


1

Transfers can be two ways. If they have to register the transfer then of course they should be able to control the flow of cash. HOWEVER, if they don't register it, as for example might the situation if I gave you my bus ticket then, apart from the economic factors, there are clearly a few accountability and safety factors. If the plane crashes for some ...


5

I wouldn't worry about Ebola in India, and neither does the Economist. There is a small Indian diaspora in West Africa (far smaller than the one in East Africa, mind you), but compared to India's sheer population the amount of passengers traveling between the two is pretty minuscule. Now add in that Ebola transmission requires direct contact with a ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


3

I think what Relaxed meant by "non-changeable fares" is tickets that are only valid for one specific flight at a given time and date and cannot be rebooked (or only for a considerable fee). Price-sensitive passengers will book those fares, but other passengers (mostly business) are willing to pay much higher fares for the luxury of not having to worry about ...


7

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


7

According to cheapair.com, the price starts to skyrocket 30 days before the departure date. Quoting it, [Within 29 days] the increase began to accelerate and once you were within 14 days the fares really shot up dramatically. Their graph:


5

As a whole airfares do not increase, rather available fare classes sell out or become invalid. On average, a economy section can have 4 to 8 fare classes available, with a limited number of spaces available in each class. As the cheaper spaces get sold, then the reservation system shows the next higher fare that is still available. In years past, a fair ...


4

I am afraid the answer is going to be “it depends”. With low cost airlines at least, the increase is gradual and it's not uncommon to see markedly lower prices for flights at inconvenient times. So a ticket on such a flight might still be available at a given price a week out whereas similar tickets for a more attractive flight on the same day disappeared a ...


119

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


2

The reason I asked about how many jetways were used is because there is an exit right by where we're sitting in the back of the plane. If they used that I would get off rather quickly The jetbridge does not stretch all the way to the back of the airplane (irrespective of the type of aircraft) it has very limited movement. If you were to be deplaned ...


0

Make a card for everyone. Once points are accumulated transfer it to your card.


4

There are no direct flights from those 3 countries. There are direct flights from Senegal and Nigeria, and these 2 countries have had a few cases of Ebola, but they are all of people who were in contact with people who've come from the 3 outbreak countries, the transmission is under control, and it's not spreading in the general population. Source: ...


6

A quick search from the capitals of the three countries to NYC or MIA shows no direct flights. Almost all of them stop in Morocco or somewhere in Europe, before continuing on to the US. However, and ignoring how effective a travel ban may or may not be on stopping Ebola, what it would consist of is written up quite well in this National Geographic article. ...


8

You would be best to check the airline's booking rules and term of carriage before you start making your reservation. Quite a few airlines require that the card be shown to verify its validity for online bookings. If they do, then you can't use a virtual card. Virtual cards are designed to offer security in transactions where you are unsure of the safety ...


-4

I've never been asked for my credit card on checkin or boarding, nor have I ever heard of anyone I know being asked for one. It would be extremely weird for such a thing to be asked for, as a lot of tickets (probably the majority) are not paid for with a personal credit card (or indeed any credit card). A large percentage of traffic is business travel, ...


2

A multiple entry visa by definition allows you to enter the country multiple times as long as the visa and any other additional conditions associated with the visa are valid. So if the conditions regarding your travel to Singapore are the same as earlier and as you mentioned, your visa is still valid, you can travel to Singapore and then back to Indonesia.


1

There shouldn't be a problem from a customs and immigration or airline handling perspective. Just wipe it clean and call it a day. Worse things have spilled from customer luggage (dirty diapers, colostomy bags, etc. etc.). However..... if it was DEET based, then you should know that DEET will weaken nylon and other plastics. You should keep an eye out for ...



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