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0

According to cheapair.com, it's 54 days in advance. At least in 2013 it was. Quoting the article, [They] monitored 4,191,533 trips. For each trip – that is, a flight from city A to city B on a specific date with a specific trip length– we looked at prospective fares over about a 10½ month booking window, ranging from 320 days in advance, to 1 day in ...


0

Lots of now outdated information here - in defence of RynaAir who I just flew with, they never measured or weighed my main bag (I wasn't hoping they didn't, it would have fit just fine in their sizer) or my smaller additional bag they now allow free too (laptop bag probably would have been pushing it though). I think this is the equivalent of a handbag for ...


0

The only potential problem is that you may be asked to show a return ticket (or evidence of an e-ticket, I suppose) in order to enter the US, as evidence of your intention to leave. In practice, I have never seen or heard of anyone being required to show that. If it should happen to you, the border guard would not care whether the return ticket is a ...


2

If you contact BA to cancel ths Newcastle leg, they will reprice the ticket out of London at the fare that is avaiable that day, which likely will be higher, plus a change fee. If you skip the first flight without notifying them, then all subsequent flights will be cancelled. If the fare is that much better, why not take the train to Newcastle and fly from ...


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Anything that looks like a weapon is not allowed in the carry on, and this is pre 9-11. A long time ago I once caused quite a stir with a key chain shaped as a gun, the size of a thumb.


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Advance Passenger Information System or APIS gets inserted into your booking either by yourself or if you booked through a travel agent. It is usually inserted for all international travel. The information used is basically your passport number, place of issue, nationality, gender, name and surname all of which can be found on your passport. I think the ...


0

even if you're allowed to take them out of the US (don't see why not unless they're listed as endangered in which case even having them as pets might be illegal) you may want to check whether you're allowed to import them to Sweden... Some countries have severe restrictions on importing life animals. If that's all settled (and all the paperwork properly ...


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Knives don't go in carry-on, period. (maybe really small ones, depending on the country.) The material the knife is made of doesn't matter. Ceramic, wood (ebony will hold a nice edge), bone, flint and so on have all made fine weapons millenia before steel. If you do pack a non-metallic weapon in the darker corners of your carry-on, and they find it, you ...


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No. Restricted items may only be carried in checked luggage. However, Singapore Airlines permits you to check at least 30 kg for free, so I would suggest you simply check your carry-on luggage.


0

I'm a British Citizen who have travelled between Canada and USA. The ETSA is only for flights as you rightly said. If I drive through the border, then I must stop at USA Immigrations and pay $6, fill in quick form, and have my fingerprints taken. I have not done this via the train so I don't know how that part works. As for entering Canada, shouldn't be ...


4

As far as I can tell, there seems to be no IATA or ICAO rule regarding the maximum number of codeshares a flight may be marketed under. I imagine there must be a technological limitation at some point, but having seven or eight codeshares is not terribly uncommon, and flights with a dozen or more have been reported in discussions at FlyerTalk and at ...


1

Actually it is not likely to be. Part of the process of receiving H1B or H4 stamp is going to the consulate for an interview. While mostly a formality based on that interview your petition may still be denied. So until you actually have H4 stamping you don't have a visa you just have an approved petition for one from Department of Homeland Security. EDIT ...


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No. Firstly, note that you'll likely be required to get a visa at the border with the US, even though you're in the visa-waiver countries for ESTA - it apparently only counts for flights, or within 90 days of a flight into the US if arriving by land(!) as I found out, twice. However, leaving the country there's not even a passport check - you simply need ...


5

Yes, you can, and I have, as evidence. I flew a very similar route, from Austin to Phoenix, and then on to San Fran. I've also done other internal flights. All on the Visa-Waiver Program. The visa-waiver is a check done at the international border, as you enter the US from another country. Once you're within the strict US border, you're permitted to ...


2

To my knowledge, all USA visas let you travel within the country without restrictions. The purpose of visa is to control entry at the border. This also applies to the visa waiver program. You can find additional information about the visa waiver program in this brochure.


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Your first obstacle with a far future return date will be the airline having to make sure your visa/wiaver status allows you to stay that long in the USA. Airlines are mandated to check that aspect and required to deny boarding if you don't qualify. Why not cancel the one way return ticket and apply its value towards your next trip and simply buy the ...


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What she needs to do is to report her marriage and name change to the Korean Embassy and have a new Korean passport issued with her new name. Irregardless of the dual nationality issue, her name changed at marriage and needs to be updated on her Korean documents (passport, DL, etc). As long as her two passports have different names, travel between the ...


2

My question is: the next time she exits New Zealand to go back to Korea, what passport should she use? The easiest way to do this is the following: Book the tickets using her Korean name. Because she will use both passports (and therefore both names) at different times during travel, her Korean name is the only one that appears in both passports (as ...


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Turkey is listed by Air France as one of the countries requiring this type of information. The Air France list is slightly different from the Wikipedia list (itself based on an info page from Air Canada) but the latter does not claim to be comprehensive (“these countries include […]”). I guess this is called “APIS” by analogy with the US system and other ...


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According to a list provided by Air France, Turkey is one of the countries that utilizes APIS. Wikipedia's list is probably just out-of-date.


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Yes, there's nothing stopping you. From my understanding of the question, you have a need for: flight to the US (A) flight back (B) - already booked and are considering (C) another flight back to be combined with A to make a return ticket, which you'll use at a later date. All your tickets are just that - tickets for flights on day X, Y or Z. If you ...


3

Most countries let their nationals leave and enter with very little requirements beyond holding some form of ID. There was and is such a thing as an exit visa in some parts of the world or countries that do not readily issue passports to limit emigration (historically, it was in fact a passport's main purpose) but I would be very surprised if that was the ...


1

There are noise-canceling and noise-blocking implements. Good-quality earplugs (NRR of 33 or higher) will attenuate noise within a frequency range, blocking out the white noise (engine noise, wind noise, etc.) that is common in air flights. They will attenuate baby crying and other loud noises. A variety of over-the-ear, on-the-ear, and in-ear head- or ...


12

The "enter and exit a country with the same passport" rule is not absolute. It's mostly for if you're visiting a country for a short visit, for entry/departure tracking purposes. In this case, where she naturalized, it's not only possible but expected of her to enter and leave New Zealand with a New Zealand passport, because she is now a New Zealand ...


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My suggestion is to use only the New Zealand passport for the trip and book the flight tickets with the name written on the New Zealand passport. New Zealanders don't require a visa to visit South Korea (90 days). The only problem is her dual citizenship situation, New Zealand allows dual citizenship without issues, South Korea has some limitations on this ...


2

Osama bin Ladin was found and killed in Pakistan, one of al-Qaeda's alleged senior operatives, Adam Pearlman, is an American citizen that is supposed to have joined al Qaeda while in Pakistan, the US Department of State recommends US citizens avoid Pakistan for all but essential travel due to terroristic threats, the 2008 Mumbai attacks were carried out by ...


1

There're plenty of variables that defines the price of a ticket. In general it comes to this: Time in advance you purchased the ticket (the longer [usually)] the better) Stay in destination Seasonality To answer your question regarding length of trip (item 2) look at the Saturday night Rule. This distinguish business from pleasure. So you'll know when ...


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Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


1

If flying to South Africa or even simply transiting through South Africa and you are taking minors (anybody under the age of 18) with you, there were some recent regulations passed in the country which will be very relevant to you: All minors have to travel with full unabridged birth certificates (i.e. showing both parents). Both the named parents have to ...


1

Technical stop? No. However, I would check that it is a pure technical stop - Mumbai -> London -> USA is a long time to be in one aircraft. And Heathrow is a rather expensive place to fuel up. They could do a technical stop just as easily in Copenhagen unless they have a reason to land in London.


4

Air travel burns fossil fuel, and therefore carbon that used to be buried deep under our planet's surface for millions of years ends up in the atmosphere as CO2. This is generally considered a bad thing because changing the long term global concentration of CO2 in the air changes the global climate. You are basically asking "are commonly offered carbon ...


3

In a first-order approximation, it definitely is technically possible to offset carbon emissions. There's very little debate about that. Both schemes to increase carbon capture (primarily tree planting) as well as schemes to decrease carbon emissions elsewhere (e.g. solar ovens for developing countries, eliminates wood ovens) work. The two problems are ...


4

It definitely needs to be noted that some airlines these days require the flyer to present the original credit card used to book the ticket upon check-in too. This is an attempt to reduce internet fraud. Check with your airline if this is the case, as the airlines are generally super strict if they follow this policy (no credit card, no flight, no ...


17

Just to repeat Relaxed's excellent answer. Yash, the process is: (1) PURCHASE a ticket. These days, that is almost always online at say Expedia, or over the phone. You'll get some sort of purchase code, like XFD123HHC Note that these days, it's usually confusing since there is both an EXPEDIA code and a code from one or more AIRLINES! So, write all ...


2

LAN Airlines now flies from Sydney to Santiago, as well as from Santiago to Mexico City. ITA Matrix gives an approximate price of $2600 for a round flight through Chile.


3

You can do wide year long searches with Skyscanner. Cheaper tickets can be found by using ITA Matrix to search multiple airports from one place to another, you can't book using ITA Matrix but it can be used to find cheap deals. You can set up Flight Price Alerts using Kayak. Prices can vary upon which airline, airport and how many people have booked and ...


25

It would depend on the airline and the airport/country but no matter how you buy the ticket, the next big step is what's called “checking in”. This is when the airline assigns you a seat and confirms that you will indeed be flying. In most cases, you can now check in online a few days to a few hours before departure and print the boarding pass at home (or ...


2

When you buy a ticket online (or otherwise) you get a reservation code. Normally one could print out a confirmation email just so you have that code on paper for reference. With that code on the date of the flight you will go to the airport to the counter of the airline that sold you a ticket and a lot of airlines nowadays provide electronic means of ...


2

In U.S. airports, in the after-security area, there is usually a customer service area for each airline. This is for re-printing boarding passes for people who lost them, and for re-booking for people who missed the flight while in the after-security area. You can talk to them in this area. If you've just arrived at the gate too late (e.g. they just closed ...


0

The other two answers are not correct. As with some other low-cost airlines (namely Ryanair), the word "reservation" applies to the one-way ticket per person. That is, if you bought the return ticket, you have made two "reservations". Similarly, if you bought the tickets for several people, then you have several "reservations". I confirmed this with ...


6

It is surely acceptable to ask staff. However, I know from experience that it is not uncommon in Atlanta that a member of the airline staff will be waiting at the gate asking everyone if they have connecting flights. This is the right person to ask. If I recall correctly, I also got a ticket there for the immigration fast lane. Should there be a line at ...


-1

The gov.uk website will have more information on this. As long as you don't plan on leaving the airport you should be considered as transit. Heathrow has a lot of shops and restaurants you can go to during your layover.


1

I feel the front is dangerous because it may hit the ground first. (Warning: sweeping generalizations ahead) Yes, if the plane lands in Lawn Dart mode. In that case no one gets out in (literally) one piece. Landing accidents often hit tail-first, as the pilot will be trying to pull the plane up. If it's a really good smack on the runway the front ...


4

There is really no way to get the exact flight path at the time of booking unless you buy the ticket at the airport. And even then the flight plan may change due to unexpected conditions or air traffic control suggestions. The best you can do is to look at services like Flight Aware or Flight Radar 24 that will give you historical flight paths for a given ...


4

The kicker is the delay, once you pass the airlines reporting deadline, the chances for compensation drop to basically zero. Too easy for folks to start claiming all sorts of non-existant items. Personally I would have been persistent with calls or perhaps gone back to the airport to report the theft. At this point your best bet is to write a polite ...


3

The safest place is in your seat with your seatbelt fastened. On the rare occasions where something happens to a plane, and some people are hurt and some are not, the ones who are not hurt are in a seat and belted in. This is typically turbulence or rapid descent. Situations where planes actually crash and some people survive are very rare. Attempting to ...


0

Edit: As Kate Gregory's answer says, having your seat belt fastened is probably the most important safety recommendation. Next would be to know where your next exit is and listening to all the safety information given by the crew. That said, contrary to the other answers claims, there may be dependencies on where you sit and fatal crashes where some people ...


4

The travel consent letter is addressed to immigration officers, who want to avoid that one parent kidnaps the child to another country without consent from the other parent, thus making it very hard to retrieve the child. Traveling inside the country is much less of a risk, since there is no issue of lack of extradition treaties domestically. Also, as ...


5

As Air India mentions in their Citizen's Charter, For domestic journeys, along with a copy of your ticket, you will be required to show any of the following identification: Photo Identification of the passenger i.e. : Passport, Driving License, Pan Card, Voter card ,Student ID, Military ID, Photo Credit Card, Airlines ID, Any Photo ID card by ...


2

One factor that hasn't been mentioned is noise abatement procedures which are put in place to avoid noise pollution. For example, heathrow, gatwick and stansted all limit flights as they are located in urban areas; so if your flight is connecting through these airports, it may also dictate timings. Boeing provides a comprehensive database that lists ...



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