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0

Traveling is a personal experience and the things you will need really depend on what you want to do. If you are going on holiday where you will be doing a bunch of things, I will pack all the necessary things I need at home and not worry too much about my trip. To cut to the chase, here's my list of essentials: Shades or sunglasses, don't forget them. If ...


1

Whether or not you intend to leave the airport, you will likely be required to go through immigration in Dubai. According to http://www.emirates.com/english/plan_book/essential_information/visa_passport_information/uae_visas.aspx, citizens of some countries require a visa in order to enter the UAE (Qatar is part of the GCC so citizens of Qatar do not need a ...


2

As @AriBrodsky said in his comment, if you are departing Canada from one of 8 airports that have United States border preclearance which are staffed by US Customs and Immigration officers, your luggage may be cleared all the way to your final destination. If you are not departing from an airport with these preclearance procedures implemented, then you will ...


1

It certainly is a viable idea and it is being done by business travelers though not for the same purpose. Going forward all rates and sizes are taking from current USPS information If you will be able to fit your luggage into a 12"x12"x5.5" box and ship it to your destination using priority mail you can certainly save money if you do not insure the package ...


0

Since you specifically say that your fear does not arise from thoughts that the plane may crash, etc., most answers that relate to fear of flying will not apply to you. I speculate that your anxiety is more of a social nature. You are in a situation where you sit with many others who are rarely talking. This is different from travelling on a train because ...


1

(This is my personal experience from flying 4-5 times a year) It may differ from person to person, but my girlfriend always takes a pill against seasickness before takeoff (not because she gets sick, but because she has anxiety). It lasts around 5 hours and makes her really sleepy and she has that "I don't care"-feeling. After taking the pill, she tries to ...


6

Since pilots can and do change routes all the time (based among other things on the weather and instructions from traffic control), it's impossible to know long in advance. Airlines also evaluate risks themselves and make changes accordingly. What you could do is use some tracking system like FlightAware to see what route a given flight has been using in ...


2

You're probably overthinking this, as the actual price will depend more on the route, the time, etc. than the airline. It's probably best to just check the price for your specific journey and book the cheapest tickets you can find. If you don't mind a longer travel, you could also use some search engine that will consider many airlines and indirect routes. ...


3

You could also check Cityjet. They used to be an air france, but changed owners recently. Furthermore, do check all, because depending on dates you want to fly all might be the cheapest. Personally, I avoid Ryanair, just to avoid the hazzle, but if you are strictly abiding to their rules, and buy checked luggage ahead of time, they might be the cheapest


2

This is absolutely doable. Ideally, check the bags through. Even if you have to get your bags, there are left luggage facility in each terminal, where you can leave your bags for the day for a few quid (under $10) each. There are many ways to get from Heathrow into London - depending where in London you need to get to. Search this site - there are plenty ...


3

Y is the universal designator for economy, the other fare classes tend to be discounted fares within economy. Without seeing the full copy it could be that you booked a ticket in H class which is in the economy cabin (Y). Somewhere within your booking record there should be a "fare basis" listed, usually starting with a letter followed by 4 to 7 more ...


4

You've basically got three options in terms of ticketing it: Multi-city trip - A single ticket for UK to Washington, Washington to SF, SF back to the UK Open-Jaw + Single - One ticket for UK to Washington, back from SF to the UK (the "open jaw"), plus a single ticket from Washington to SF Two returns - A return ticket from the UK to Washington, then ...


1

Because you have to claim and recheck bags when transiting through the USA, you could add your second checked bag at that point. Delta has a baggage counter after you clear immigration and customs in Atlanta. Just tell them you are tired of carrying your "carry on" bag and want to check it through. Likewise if you are planning on picking up more stuff in ...


3

The closest I have seen to what you are looking for is through Kayak. Based on certain criteria that it determines, tickets with multiple legs can have different booking classes. For instance, the below Delta flight YOW-LHR-YOW has a total of 4 legs each of which can be booked in either Economy or Business. The Details tab You then move to the Fares tab ...


0

Technically, passenger aircraft are also cargo carrying aircraft, so the answer is yes, however aircraft specifically licensed or designed without passenger seating would only permit flight crews, essential staff that accompany live freight, or in the case of military with armaments. The liability for passengers and security arrangements would make general ...


1

I flew with Germanwings last year and checked in at the airport on both legs. No extra charge.


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The FAQ has a whole section on regular (non-web) check-in and mentions “check-in desk” without hinting at extra costs so it seems pretty safe to conclude that checking in at the airport is possible (I have not done it myself). Also, Can I choose my seat when I check in? implies that choosing a seat should not cost you anything: You can check in and ...


3

Your name should appear on the ticket exactly as it's in the passport. To make it simpler: First name on the ticket = first name on passport Last name on ticket = last name on passport it doesn't matter what is your english name or your nick name, what matters is what is written on the passport in english. So, here's an example of a Chinese passport (I ...


7

Airlines when making schedules they take into account extra time for push back, taxi out, taxiing, taxi in and parking. The block time you see at the ticket is the time of the flight plus these things, while the actual flying time which you hear during the welcome announcement in the aircraft is purely the flying time. In addition to that, airports are ...


0

I see many more problems than just the airplanes here. Though it seems to be a small item, I do not know how long yours precisely is. But depending on the type of blade it can already be considered a weapon when it has a rather short blade. For example in this brochure, unfortunately I found only the German one, Swiss authorities explain, that a knife with a ...


6

As the comments say, the short answer is 'we' don't generally. Airlines use many different boarding systems and boarding back-to-front is generally most popular. Mythbusters took a look at this and you'll see that there's a problem. Boarding methods that are actually faster make customers less satisfied. So an airline may choose to go front-to-back because ...


1

Just call the airlines shown on the itinerary (if American, call American), and tell them the details of the flight. I booked mine easily, and I only paid an extra 25 bucks as booking charge. The price was as came up on the ITA search engine.


7

Low-cost airline transfers are non-protected even if you fly with the same airline on both legs, which is why they typically won't show up in a search. Not only that, you will have to book each leg separately (again, even if they're with the same low-cost airline). If you search with SkyScanner, tick the option "Non-protected transfers" under "Multi-part ...


3

On the page Booking Children WizzAir specifies that up to 10 children can be accompanied by one adult: CHILDREN Children between the age of 2 years and 14 years old are booked as children but must occupy their own seat and pay the adult fare Wizz Air accepts children travelling together on the condition that there is a minimum of one ...


7

There are no direct flights from Doncaster-Sheffield Airport (DSA) to any London airport. Sheffield-London uses the Midland Main Line, which is not a particularly fast main railway line. The fastest services take two hours and one minute. Depending on exactly whereabouts in Sheffield you are leaving from, you might be able to use trains from Doncaster, ...


10

WikiTravel has a quite extensive guide on Sheffield. Looking for travel options, By Car Google Maps suggests that the distance is coverable by car in 3 hours and is about 160 miles, which seems a reasonable estimate. By Rail London St. Pancras, once per hour, operated by East Midlands Trains. Looking at their website tells me that it would take at ...


1

Me and my friends have done that several times. One of my friends regularly uses a ticket which her father buys from Oman to the US to travel to and fro from the US i.e for a flight originating in the US but the ticket is bought in Oman by a different person (a family member in this case). I have done the opposite several times as well, wherein I have ...


3

I was on the receiving end of such a ticket once, when I was invited to a conference in the US. In my case it was a European carrier (Lufthansa), but paid to their US office. In general it was not different from other bookings, where I made the booking myself. I got the same booking confirmations. However, when I tried to check in, it didn't go through. The ...


2

Unfortunately, in this day and age, anything usable as a weapon must be eyed with suspicion. It doesn't matter if it's part of your religious garb or artifacts -- if it could potentially be used to attack passengers or crew, it's a weapon and cannot be carried on. If some countries, such as India, want to make exceptions for small ones on domestic flights, ...


20

Karlson beautifully took care of the international aspect of this situation wherein unfortunately you cannot carry a kirpan as carry-on on yourself. But, since Mr.Sardarji is a religious person and it is possible that he would like to make his family happy without making sacrifices with his beliefs I would like to provide more information with regard to the ...


11

I'm a fellow Sikh, and unfortunately there isn't much you can do in this situation. You will have to remove your kirpan and place it in check-in luggage as posted by @karlson. Some sikhs wear these small kirpans in their necklace, Others don't travel by plane at all. While traveling do remove kirpan. You should do ardaas before and after, Guru Sahib ...


41

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


4

The most important thing to remember about these new regulations is that they only apply at "certain overseas airports". In general, the TSA has no authority at overseas airports, and all airport security is carried out by the equivalent security group in the country the airport resides in. However at some international airports, direct flights to the US ...


3

Here is a link to the official announcement from the TSA: http://www.tsa.gov/press/releases/2014/07/06/enhanced-security-measures-certain-airports-overseas The text contains the following statement: "During the security examination, officers may also ask that owners power up some devices, including cell phones. Powerless devices will not be permitted ...


5

Oddly enough I wasn't able to find any information on this online, I'll continue to search in case I'm able to find something. Meanwhile, I'll tell you the general rules. As you would expect, it is entirely dependent on the policy of the country in which the airline is registered. Considering that, since the drinking age in Iceland is 20, the drinking age ...


3

I don't think any airline would allow you to take that sword as carry-on luggage into the cabin with you. However, you should be able to check it in as luggage (but it may be considered oversize luggage, which may be an extra fee). Just be sure to pack it well (you can find info about packing actual swords as luggage online, which may be helpful).


4

The exact size limits for carry-on will depend on the airline, but your sword probably exceeds most airlines'. For example: Qantas's maximum dimension for a piece of carry-on luggage on a domestic flight is 115 cm (about 3' 9") Jetstar's is 56 cm (about 1' 10")


4

If an airline is planning to open a new route, especially international routes, they will need a long list of approvals before they can operate that route. Usually this process is a bureaucratic process since it involves many organizations (civil aviation authorities, airport authorities, etc.). Anyway, airlines usually have a green light to open the route ...


-2

Of course, a little biased, but I'm working on this travel search website that helps planning more complex routes by including the driving aspect: http://www.travelwits.com Let me know if it helps.


2

Put simply, no, you can't do this - for multiple reasons. Firstly lets ignore check luggage for a moment. Any time you fail to board a flight, the airline will almost certainly cancel any subsequent flights on that ticket. So if you book MEM-NRT-HKG-NRT-MEM, then fail to board the NRT-HKG flight, then the remainder of your ticket - including the NRT-MEM ...


3

Generally you cannot do this. Your baggage will be checked to your final destination. If you ask them to check it to the midway point, they will know what you are doing, and either refuse, or cancel your ticket entirely. The only two exceptions I'm aware of are: If you have a long, overnight layover, the airline will often allow you to retrieve and ...


1

Yes, unfortunately you will need to retrieve your bags and re-check them. I haven't had this exact scenario, but I have flown on a mixed Delta/British Airways flight before, where customs didn't even play into it (Cape Town to Johannesburg on British, Johannesburg to Atlanta on Delta), and was forced to re-check my bags. I don't know if any airlines have ...


1

Also checkout Hipmunk.com they certainly show a variety of options so should show you which stops are available to you between certain stops and on what airlines. Mind you they do not have all the airlines but it should give you some idea.


6

Sounds like Rome2Rio? Doesn't show you all the possibilities, mind you, but a sensible subset, and also works in trains, buses, ferries etc when applicable.


5

I don't see why there should be an issue. You are a Singaporean national and being a Malaysian Resident should not be an issue at all. Singaporean nationals are allowed to travel visa free to Hong Kong for up to 90 days, which I believe is lesser than your intended period of stay. From there, you are free to board a flight to Los Angeles (United States) ...


3

Norwegian LowFare tickets for flights within the Nordic countries can be canceled without charge within 4 hours after the booking. After that, the tickets are non-refundable. If it's any help, you can however until 30 minutes before departure change the name, destination or time by paying a fee. Depending on whether or not you have further plans to fly, that ...


4

As a tour operator, my first advice is to skip the international airfare component, as the moment you tell everyone you have a deal on Delta, Uncle Joe will say he wants United for points and cousin Ellie will say she wants LAN to use her credit card points. Plus if they are starting in different cities, it becomes a nightmare. And group rates aren't any ...


5

The rules are explained on the official EU website. It sometimes difficult to understand how they apply to a given situation but the page should be authoritative. In your case, my understanding is that you do need a visa to visit other European countries. To understand why, you have to make a few distinctions. Assuming you are talking about a short stay, ...


1

It depends a lot on the circumstances and the airports involved. But yes, that can very well be the case. So, whenever I had a short transit (< 30 mins), I received the luggage among the first at my final destination. The hypothesis being of course that since my luggage arrived way after the others, First-In-Last-Out implies that it gets out first. I ...


3

Like most airlines, Lufthansa follow a fixed numbering schema for their flights. As per Wikipedia (in German), their current flight numbering schema, which they changed to in late 2010 includes : LH8000 – LH8515 Flüge der Lufthansa Cargo ie, Flight numbers between LH8000 and LH8515 are Flights for Lufthansa Cargo. As your flight number calls within this ...



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