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128

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


73

One of the steps of preparing the cabin for landing is checking that all passengers are seated and buckled up, and no passengers are using the toilets and toilets are locked (it can be [un]locked from outside). The reasons behind checking the toilets for passengers during landing and takeoffs are related to safety and security. The safety related reasons ...


71

Consider this: why is the food so bad at large banquets and weddings? (Ever hear the phrase "rubber chicken" to describe an industry awards banquet?) why is the food so bad in prison? why is the food so bad in a school cafeteria? why is the food so bad at a university residence? In all of these cases, just as on the airplane: a very large quantity of ...


53

As a flight attendant for years, NO, no one tips flight attendants. Flight attendants are usually paid very well, and in some cases, very very well. They are usually paid per hour in addition to a basic salary and many bonuses for having layovers out of town and other stuff. Tipping them would be considered offensive and an insult in most airlines anyway. ...


48

They have the holes because of the machines that made them (check DavidG's answer), anyway this ice cubes with holes are better for planes for a few reasons: Because they are lighter (believe it or not, every gram in the aviation business counts, plus the ice is not made onboard, it is loaded prior to departure just like the food) They cool things faster ...


44

You're fortunate enough to have never hit really bad turbulence. Although injuries from turbulence are rare they do happen. And from the FAA page: Why is it important to follow these safety regulations? Consider this: In nonfatal accidents, in-flight turbulence is the leading cause of injuries to airline passengers and flight attendants. Each ...


42

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


42

It depends on where you are and how you're travelling. If you need to pass through customs then the baggage collection area is typically closed to all but travellers, so requires forethought and an outlay of a flight to gain access. However in some circumstances, i.e. domestic flights, definitely in Australia and the U.S. amongst others, the statement is ...


40

I have direct experience with this; not actually in flight thank goodness, but in transit. My daughter was born prematurely in Shanghai last year during a short layover between Paris and Auckland. My wife and I only had limited 48-hour transit visas for China and our flight was due to depart about 10 hours after she was admitted to hospital at the beginning ...


40

As a cabin crew member, I have first hand experiences with real turbulence, both anticipated and unanticipated. The story of asking passengers to fasten seatbelts is not about people being thrown off their seats only, here are the reasons: Flying people Passengers and crew can literally fly around the cabin in real turbulence causing injuries not only to ...


38

All modern aircraft have to go through incredibly stringent safety checks and are essentially equally safe. Accidents are so rare that any apparent differences in aircraft safety are mostly meaningless statistical anomalies. Airfleets.net has a chart of accidents per aircraft type, but it's not easy to make any practical conclusions about it. For example, ...


38

It is not a pleasant situation for both of them - the passenger or the large passenger. It is very uncomfortable for the passenger and totally embarrassing for the large guy. In addition to that, it is uncomfortable and embarrassing for the staff. Unfortunately, there is no one single rule that applies here; each airline has its own policy regarding this. ...


38

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


36

It seems that is not that airlines serving you bad food, it is more your perception on the food that plays tricks with your mind. Only today the Atlantic published a nice article on this topic with the appropriate title "Why Airplane Food Is So Bad". It boils down to pressurised cabins and economics of the masses. Some quotes from this article: ...


36

It's complicated, but as always, Wikipedia has it covered. The short version is that in the vast majority of cases, the baby will inherit one or more citizenships from its parents through jus sanguinis, and nothing more. If the baby is born within the territorial limits of a country that applies jus soli, including flying overheard and within nautical ...


35

Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


35

Lots of reasons! Most of which boil down to prioritizing time and convenience over cost. You need to fly to a city with no direct service. Most LCCs only sell "point to point" and will not cover missed connections, while full-service carriers do. You have an unpredictable schedule and need the ability to change your flights easily. LCCs tend to fly less ...


33

In my experience, having a positive detection at the swab testing station is not a problem. The testing machines only give an indication of possible explosive residue, and are not conclusive. Several times I have had a positive detection at the swab test station (not actually carrying or handling any explosives). If they get a positive test, they may ask ...


32

It is a hanger, you can hang your jacket or anything similar there. The same exact ones typically available in lavatories for passengers and in galleys for crew members. In the passengers cabin, they are usually available in first or business classes' seats and it comes with a sign: I guess they forgot to add the sign, making it harder for passenger to ...


32

The other answers are correct, but they rely on the assumption that wet wipes are not liquid, gel, aerosol, cream, or paste, without any evidence that the TSA would accept that. As you correctly pointed out in a comment, wet wipes contain liquid. How can we check whether the liquid contained in wet wipes causes them to fall under the 3-1-1 rule? Try the ...


32

Yes they don't check it. Why there isn't more theft? This has been discussed on Metafilter and I think this comment sums it up: The simple answer is that there's no way to know that the owner of the bag you're taking isn't standing right next to you. Throw in all the security measures nearby, and any thinking thief is going to prefer shoplifting or ...


30

No, you can't. I know a lot about planes and their systems and I can tell you for sure, some tissues can block the toilet. I am sure your butt is a bit heavier and bigger than some tissues. Also, some planes have a manual handle to control the flush in case it is stuck open. It happens sometime and the only bad side is not sucking people's butts, but the ...


30

In the retail drinks trade (pubs, bars etc), machines that make these hollow ice cubes are often* used where there is not much room to store large quantities of ready-produced ice (such as in a much larger machine). The larger surface area to volume ratio means fresh ice cubes can be made more efficiently and quickly to meet demand - by the time one batch is ...


30

The most important thing in this situation is to get documentation about your luggage as soon as possible. No matter what the airline says, the only thing that matters is what they write. As this issue might be continued within the legal system (lawyers, etc) you should start gathering documents you can show to the judge. As I see it, the most important ...


29

It's because the machine that creates the cubes has metal prongs that the ice 'grows' around.


28

There is no clear explicit rule regarding sleeping next to bulkheads. Why are some airlines strict about it? the usual "safety" excuse is used here and I can assure you this time the safety excuse is legitimate. In addition to that, passengers are only allowed to sit in "passenger seats", they are not even allowed to sit on crew seats, so this can be used as ...


28

Needs of a domestic flight: check in check luggage go through security board plane Additional needs of an international flight: valid passport check at check-in visa check at check-in to ensure you have the rights to enter the destination country (not every country) exit passport control - outbound stamp, check (not every country) departure forms need ...


27

Pretty darn safe. Most terrorism or problems in those countries is on the ground. Yes some people might have SAMs (surface to air missiles) but the odds of them even seeing you at 800km/hr+ and 33000ft+ and hitting getting you is not worth considering. They wouldn't waste their weaponry trying. When a place is considered too dangerous to fly, there are ...


27

If it is overbooked, it can't take off. Each passenger must have a seat, it is not a bus. In that particular case where the airline needs to move some crew from one airport to another (Deadheading Crew), they only do that in cases where the crew will be essential for a flight at the destination airport to take off, so for the greater good, they might ...


26

It would depend on the airline and the airport/country but no matter how you buy the ticket, the next big step is what's called “checking in”. This is when the airline assigns you a seat and confirms that you will indeed be flying. In most cases, you can now check in online a few days to a few hours before departure and print the boarding pass at home (or ...



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