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128

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


106

"Sir/Ma'am, no thank you." or "Sir/Ma'am, I am not interested." Followed by (if needed) "Sir/Ma'am, I am sorry, but I specifically requested and was given this seat. I am not willing to change to another seat for any reason. Perhaps someone else might wish to help you."


67

The other answers are excellent, and correct. I wanted to share a few extra ideas because you specifically said: Do note that I am very shy and submissive in public. I also am a shy person that's, for various reasons, done a lot of travelling on my own. What I always say to myself is: You'll never see any of these people ever again. And that ...


53

As a flight attendant for years, NO, no one tips flight attendants. Flight attendants are usually paid very well, and in some cases, very very well. They are usually paid per hour in addition to a basic salary and many bonuses for having layovers out of town and other stuff. Tipping them would be considered offensive and an insult in most airlines anyway. ...


51

Short answer: Yes, it appears you can, I wouldn't. Longer answer. I certainly can't find anything that would prevent you from doing so, there's similar threads over on FlyerTalk and Yahoo! Answers where people come to the same conclusion. Additionally there's at least one case of it actually happening. However, as noted it those threads and the comments, ...


48

Yes, if aircraft safety or your personal safety requires it, you will be asked to sit down and close your safety belt. That is true for all aircraft and any time of the year. Maybe they will allow you a bit more leeway because they understand that prayer is important for you, but if you do not belt in when it is dangerous, they endanger all passengers, ...


44

You're fortunate enough to have never hit really bad turbulence. Although injuries from turbulence are rare they do happen. And from the FAA page: Why is it important to follow these safety regulations? Consider this: In nonfatal accidents, in-flight turbulence is the leading cause of injuries to airline passengers and flight attendants. Each ...


43

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


42

I have direct experience with this; not actually in flight thank goodness, but in transit. My daughter was born prematurely in Shanghai last year during a short layover between Paris and Auckland. My wife and I only had limited 48-hour transit visas for China and our flight was due to depart about 10 hours after she was admitted to hospital at the beginning ...


42

It depends on where you are and how you're travelling. If you need to pass through customs then the baggage collection area is typically closed to all but travellers, so requires forethought and an outlay of a flight to gain access. However in some circumstances, i.e. domestic flights, definitely in Australia and the U.S. amongst others, the statement is ...


41

As a cabin crew member, I have first hand experiences with real turbulence, both anticipated and unanticipated. The story of asking passengers to fasten seatbelts is not about people being thrown off their seats only, here are the reasons: Flying people Passengers and crew can literally fly around the cabin in real turbulence causing injuries not only to ...


39

Because you only gain 11.7% volume and give up a bunch of other advantages, including making packing worse. The volume of luggage with maximum checked-luggage dimensions (W + L + H <= 62)[1] is 27in x 21in x 14in = 7938in3. The volume of the cube is 20.7in3 = 8869.7in3. Only 11.7% more. If maximizing (packing) volume (inside a large regular space) was ...


39

Generally speaking, "yes". A BA aircraft is registered in the UK and therefore is covered by the UK laws. Under the UK law it's an offence not to obey the order of the flight crew while on the aircraft. Specifically, this is covered by the Air navigation order 2009, section 142(c): A person must not while in an aircraft ... (c) intentionally interfere ...


39

Outside of an emergency evacuation or similarly dire situation, I cannot think of any reason why a civil authority would ban a person from purchasing multiple seats. After all, it is not uncommon for people to purchase an additional seat to carry items like musical instruments or pets, or because they do not fit into a single seat. In consideration of this, ...


38

It is not a pleasant situation for both of them - the passenger or the large passenger. It is very uncomfortable for the passenger and totally embarrassing for the large guy. In addition to that, it is uncomfortable and embarrassing for the staff. Unfortunately, there is no one single rule that applies here; each airline has its own policy regarding this. ...


38

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


36

It's complicated, but as always, Wikipedia has it covered. The short version is that in the vast majority of cases, the baby will inherit one or more citizenships from its parents through jus sanguinis, and nothing more. If the baby is born within the territorial limits of a country that applies jus soli, including flying overheard and within nautical ...


36

Unaccompanied bags are only allowed in freight not on passenger flights. As you will have to show your boarding pass at the gate at Heathrow, this will be checked against the luggage loaded. If the passenger is missing or hasn't boarded, their luggage will be offloaded due to security concerns. This is normal practice across almost all airlines/airports I ...


35

Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


35

Lots of reasons! Most of which boil down to prioritizing time and convenience over cost. You need to fly to a city with no direct service. Most LCCs only sell "point to point" and will not cover missed connections, while full-service carriers do. You have an unpredictable schedule and need the ability to change your flights easily. LCCs tend to fly less ...


34

Unless it is a safety related reason, it will be very hard to change your seat without you willing to do so, that includes cabin crew. So, as mentioned in the other answer by @CGCampbell, just politely say no. You might get frowned upon but who cares! it is your seat and it is totally your right to be stuck with it. Something worth mentioning here, ...


33

Yes they don't check it. Why there isn't more theft? This has been discussed on Metafilter and I think this comment sums it up: The simple answer is that there's no way to know that the owner of the bag you're taking isn't standing right next to you. Throw in all the security measures nearby, and any thinking thief is going to prefer shoplifting or ...


32

It is a hanger, you can hang your jacket or anything similar there. The same exact ones typically available in lavatories for passengers and in galleys for crew members. In the passengers cabin, they are usually available in first or business classes' seats and it comes with a sign: I guess they forgot to add the sign, making it harder for passenger to ...


32

The other answers are correct, but they rely on the assumption that wet wipes are not liquid, gel, aerosol, cream, or paste, without any evidence that the TSA would accept that. As you correctly pointed out in a comment, wet wipes contain liquid. How can we check whether the liquid contained in wet wipes causes them to fall under the 3-1-1 rule? Try the ...


31

Flying is the fastest option (1h10), but you'll have to take into account: traveling times to the airports: London City Airport is close to the city center (22 min to Bank Station), but Edinburgh Airport is not (35 min by the tram or 30 min by the slightly faster Airport 100 bus, or 25 min in light traffic if you're driving or taking a cab outside peak ...


30

The most important thing in this situation is to get documentation about your luggage as soon as possible. No matter what the airline says, the only thing that matters is what they write. As this issue might be continued within the legal system (lawyers, etc) you should start gathering documents you can show to the judge. As I see it, the most important ...


28

Such a list would not be meaningful. All airlines have wide rules to prohibit "tampering" with seats, with Knee Defenders or otherwise; you can improvise one with a well-sized bottle, after all. Those that point out the Knee Defender as banned are only making it explicit that this specific device is not allowed. More to the point, if the passenger unable ...


27

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


27

If it is overbooked, it can't take off. Each passenger must have a seat, it is not a bus. In that particular case where the airline needs to move some crew from one airport to another (Deadheading Crew), they only do that in cases where the crew will be essential for a flight at the destination airport to take off, so for the greater good, they might ...


27

The ability to leave phones and small electronics turned on is a relatively new privilege with many airlines. And some flight crews still ask travelers to turn them off during take off and landing. During the flight, the captain and the crew under his command are the final authority and can impose additional safety restrictions if they feel them warranted ...



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