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13

I suggest you get a travel agent to work this out for you. It will be worth the $100 or so. You and your girlfriend will also need to carry a letter signed by by both parents outlining your travel plans and saying that you give permission for your daughter to travel alone with the other parent. Canadian customs can be especially picky about this when ...


4

In case the total amount of time you can spend there is more or less fixed, I would choose doing roughly two weeks Japan and one week Korea. My itinerary of suggestion would be as follows, though keep in mind that it's exactly the same if you do it in reverse order: Buy open-jaw tickets Zurich-Tokyo and Seoul-Zurich, you'll probably get a decent price with ...


4

It's very simple — since you won't be passing through immigration on your outbound leg (assuming an intra-Schengen flight), the first leg you are taking is not international. Same applies for other modes of transport - just because I take a flight to the US after taking the train to the airport doesn't mean it's necessarry to arrive to the train station 3 ...


4

Minutes. All airlines still sell walk-up tickets, where you simply rock up to the airport and ask "a ticket for the next flight, please", although you will usually pay through the nose for the privilege. In the case of standby tickets, you may not even be able to purchase the ticket until check-in has closed, which may be as little as 30 minutes before ...


3

If the liquid is red, it's mostly likely alcohol (ethanol), not mercury (so less of an issue- even if it broke it would be no worse than spilling a few drops of wine). Even small mercury thermometers are specifically allowed, as Johnny says: By the TSA and some other authorities (but Cathay Pacific, for example, does not allow them). So I think it ...


2

It depends on the airline. Online booking systems (at least the three first I tested) usually don't allow separate tickets for children to be booked. Since most airlines require smaller children (e.g. below the age of four) to always be accompanied by an adult, they may or may not also require that the child and the guardian is booked on the same ticket, ...


2

A frequent traveller I met told me that they will often do this on smaller aircraft. The reason is, that if all the people in the front disembark, the plane will become heavy in the back, and simply tip backwards. I asked him if this happened on larger aircrafts as well, to which he responded that yes, the procedure is the same on larger aircraft. This ...


1

Yes, if booked as one through ticket, declining to take the first leg usually results in the second leg being cancelled on BA. [Indeed, this is not reliably the case (some friends did an experiment recently to test this), but unless you are willing to front the cost of a walk up ticket to satiate your curiosity, I advise calling ahead.] If booked after 28 ...


1

No, the passport and Advance Passenger Information merely need to be correct at the time you check in. You can update the information at check in, either online or at the desk. Remember that, if you are a visa waiver national travelling under an ESTA, you will need a fresh ESTA with each new passport you use to enter the United States. If you have been ...


1

I will add to downhand's answer, which I mostly endorse (especially the part about the ferry!) I will give some alternative suggestions about some of my favorite places off the beaten track, especially if you like walking. I would personally spend somewhat less time in Tokyo and Seoul -- they are delightful places both, but in my opinion the tourist sights ...


1

Well three weeks is not much time, you could easily spend that in either country and just scratch the surface. For air travel, buying three one way tickets will likely cost a far bit more than buying a round trip ticket, plus a regional ticket. I would look at a couple of options: flying r/t ZRH-ICN or ZRH-NRT with a second ticket r/t between Japan and ...


1

I did transport a desktop computer over an international flight last year. I did not travel throught the United States however (through Canada), so I'm not sure about what the TSA may or may not do. I ended up bubble wrapping it and putting it in my suitcase that I checked in. The cushioning is important. As long as it is cushioned, it should be fine. Just ...


1

No. The only difference over a pure domestic itinerary at the first stage is that there will be a bit of extra time at the check in desk if (a) you have some weird through-check-in problem with a partner airline down route that day and (b) visa/passport checks. The other thing is that the "three hours required" thing is a bit of a myth. In some airports, ...


1

In general if you are traveling on one ticket, with both a domestic leg and an international leg, the international rules override the domestic rules. So when you check in, you are checking in for an "international" flight and the check in counter agents need to document your permission to enter (passport, visa, etc) the international destination. But the ...


1

Technically there is no issue with you creating 3 separate itineraries for 3 separate people and flying in any way you see fit. There are restrictions that countries and airlines place when a minor child is flying out of the country of residence/citizenship with only one or no parents with them. You will need a letter from your girlfriend that says that ...



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