Hot answers tagged

105

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


69

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


68

As part of a flight crew (I flew for middle east regional for the last 4 years with a B747), I am trained to help my passenger as best as I can. But I'm also trained to stay away from any possible hazard and to not taking extra responsibility whenever I can. Your medication is tied to your survival. That is not something I would gladly accept to be ...


63

It appears this is not possible for the Big Three US airlines. In fact, your assertion that "I know airplanes have" refrigerators on board seems to be not true in general. United Airlines: "Our aircraft do not have refrigerators on board, so please plan accordingly." Delta (under Special Concerns: Medicine): "Airplanes do not have refrigerators on board, ...


36

To directly answer the title question, yes, non-business travelers can absolutely benefit from airline loyalty programs (i.e. earning points/miles as well as status.) Whether it's worth it for you in particular, though, will be extremely dependent on your particular situation and what options are available to you on the routes you normally fly, as well as ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


26

A few years ago I read a study about cell phone usage on U.S. domestic flights. Using RF locating equipment, they determined that the average U.S. flight has 2-3 cellphones left transmitting during the flight. Unconfirmed pilot anecdotes notwithstanding, if there were any significant risk of planes malfunctioning from cellphones, they would be falling out ...


23

Your personal safety is not affected by your fellow passenger using a cellphone. In the US, the FCC (not the FAA!) has limited use of cellphones on aircraft because of the potential effect on cell towers on the ground. From an empirical standpoint, if there was a significant risk, it would have been observed many times by now as people frequently leave ...


23

In general, your luggage and you need to be on the same plane because if it contains a bomb then they want you to perish. In this case, it might be you've been pulling tricks with purchasing a ticket for a notoriously delayed flight in hopes you get separated from your bag-bomb. If it's not your fault then that's apparently fine because lost / delayed / ...


23

There are three things that set (some) frequent flier programs apart from other rewards programs. How important these are to you may determine whether they are worth doing. The first is "Status" which you refer to by mentioning business travellers. Never lining up, spending an hour or more less in the airport than others, waiting in the lounge eating and ...


17

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


17

My wife and I have a travel wallet/organiser that we take on all trips. It's a pretty dorky thing, but very handy. It's made of nylon material, and is large enough so a sheet of A4 folded into thirds will fit inside, has a zipper down three sides and contains several pockets. It's made by Eagle Creek and is similar to this one. We've had it ten years and ...


15

I didn't know until I started working in the field, but the most serious problem with leaving your cellphone on is the frequent failed attempts to connect to the many cell towers you are passing over at 500 mph. Not only does this tie up the towers' ability to connect with other people, it drains your handset battery faster.


12

My father's an airline pilot (United Airlines) and this is something that I've asked him about at length. The idea that any kind of signal from your cellphone can interfere with a plane's electronics is purely myth (Though one that the airlines are happy to allow to propagate). There're endless such signals in the air at all times anyways, and modern ...


12

This is probably the policy because of the problems delayed luggage causes at the other end, specifically with clearing US Customs. While airports/airlines usually have a protocol to clear luggage in the absence of the passenger, it is more hassle and paperwork than having the passenger take the luggage through customs themselves. The KLM Conditions of ...


11

As a rule of thumb, visas are always your responsibility, not the travel agent's or the airline's responsibility. This includes finding out if there are stopovers that require a visa along the way, and Justfly sets this out in their T&C: As a traveler, you must know and understand the applicable legal requirements related to travel, including ...


10

After I get visa, ticket, insurance, hotel bookings etc, I scan everything, as individual pdfs. Two types of documents, one which are crucial for journey, others which are just for help. Then I make two folders on my dropbox, Important and Informative. Visa, flight ticket, hotel booking, insurance, tickets, passport info page etc pdfs go to Important. ...


10

tldr: If you travel once or twice a year, on full-price airlines with frequent flyer progammes, sign up for them. But don't obsess over them, and focus on price and other benefits first. Longer answer: As always, it depends. Many (most?) budget airlines don't have a frequent flyer programme (or at least one comparable to those on full-service airlines), ...


8

I was walking around Narita Airport (Tokyo) today during a transit, and saw these signs outside toilets that immediately reminded me of this question. It appeared that all the toilets in Terminal 2 ( where I was) had the facilities. Feeling curious, I also took a photo of what I presumed to be these facilities in the disabled toilet. Therefore, another ...


7

Once you bought it, you are pretty much stuck with it. Some airlines offer a 24 hour grace period for canceling or re-booking, but a week later you are out of luck. If your ticket's fare rules allow changes, you might be able to get the better (non-stop) flight, but the change fees will wipe out any fare difference and probably end up costing you more.


7

I have never seen two jetways at the front and the back at any US or EU airport. I have seen on occassion steps used by cheapskate EU low cost airlines but never jetways. So the answer is no. Edit: apparently, not only cheapskate airlines do this. Also note "front and back" -- double jetways are not unheard of (the premium passengers get a separate one) and ...


7

Depends. If you consider low-cost airlines, those usually price each segment individually based on demand for that specific flight, so whether you include a Saturday evening or not should not change the total price. On traditional airlines, there are usually different fares for one-way and return trips (and multi-city, open jaws, etc.). Their traditional ...


7

Well the first question would be, how did your son get to Australia? Did United, STA and/or ANZ sort out a flight for him and you are simply wondering who to seek some compensation from for the hassle? Or did you have to buy a new last minute ticket? If you had to buy a new ticket, then STA is the one you need to work with to get the previous ticket ...


6

Pressure is going to be basically the same as the passengers enjoy, as the entire fuselage is pressurized. The only real difference will be temperature, as the cargo hold area is not usually heated to any great degree unless the aircraft is transporting live animals or cold sensitive perishable items. The cold section of the cargo hold may drop down to 10C ...


6

I am going to give you a different take on this question. It is in your question (customs) and seems to be overlooked in most answers. It is not really about planes, batteries, safety, or how big your bag is, it is mostly about the law of the departure and destination countries (not usually transit countries). Many countries prohibit what you can bring in ...


6

Note that while EMI concerns are practically bogus considering modern airplanes and mobile phones, you are still required to turn off all electronics during takeoff and landing, for your own safety. In case your airplane has to make an RTO maneuver or catches fire, you won't see it coming if you're concentrated on your phone or laptop. You may get hurt ...


6

I keep on me: Passport, insurances card, wallet (id, money...) I keep on iPhone: Plane e-tickets. Hotel/accommodations reservations and confirmation emails. I keep in a craft envelop in my hand luggage duplicate printout of every confirmation I received by emails. Emails are also stored in the cloud (hotmail/gmail...) to be easily accessed in internet ...


6

I will share a recent experience of mine. We were going to go on a holiday on X-Mas and I scanned and saved all the important documents in my laptop which was with me all the time. It was connected to Dropbox and so did my Phone and I thought oh well I will have all the copies in my smart phone for quick access where I can't take out my laptop. We were ...


5

You ever heard of 'Rule of Acquisition #5'? Once you have their money, you never give it back. That applies here too, but: 'non-refundable' does not necessarily mean 'lost' - most airlines allow to cancel or change the flight, and the price gets 'stored' with them for up to twelve months (counting from the day you bought the ticket, not when you canceled). ...


5

When I sent my minor children abroad alone, I always gave them notarized letters of consent. No official at any American or European border ever asked to see any documentation beyond their passport. I would treat this situation as the girl traveling alone -- having an adult "with her" in some official capacity would make the situation more complicated -- ...



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