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41

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


20

Karlson beautifully took care of the international aspect of this situation wherein unfortunately you cannot carry a kirpan as carry-on on yourself. But, since Mr.Sardarji is a religious person and it is possible that he would like to make his family happy without making sacrifices with his beliefs I would like to provide more information with regard to the ...


18

That sucks, but unfortunately all the airline is required to do is do their best to find alternate transport or offer the full refund, the 'contract of carriage' for the airline will spell this out (although they're sometimes difficult to find). You don't say who you're flying but you're in the US so I'll pick United as an example, others will be similar, ...


15

Some airlines are quite keen on having a good social media appearance. You could go for a polite online naming & shaming approach (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Blog, etc). All you need to do is to include the facebook or twitter account of the airline in your post. As @SpaceDog says, the regulations in place are well taken care of. That doesn't mean the ...


11

I'm a fellow Sikh, and unfortunately there isn't much you can do in this situation. You will have to remove your kirpan and place it in check-in luggage as posted by @karlson. Some sikhs wear these small kirpans in their necklace, Others don't travel by plane at all. While traveling do remove kirpan. You should do ardaas before and after, Guru Sahib ...


10

It seems to be a cargo flight; you can find it on the Lufthansa Cargo website.


10

WikiTravel has a quite extensive guide on Sheffield. Looking for travel options, By Car Google Maps suggests that the distance is coverable by car in 3 hours and is about 160 miles, which seems a reasonable estimate. By Rail London St. Pancras, once per hour, operated by East Midlands Trains. Looking at their website tells me that it would take at ...


8

Airlines often have seating blocks that are specifically for elite level frequent flyers (often marked on seat maps as "preferred" or simply shown as unavailable to non-elite flyers). If flights are not full, airlines may also choose not to seat anyone next to their highest level elite flyers, even giving them the whole row to themselves. But short of ...


7

In my experience flying to the US (about 25 times in the last 10 years), I never once was asked to prove anything related to the medication. I had brought prescription antibiotics with me before, on one or two trips - and wasn't even asked anything at all. They were also in blister packs, all in my hand luggage. I had more questions asked in Australia ...


7

There are no direct flights from Doncaster-Sheffield Airport (DSA) to any London airport. Sheffield-London uses the Midland Main Line, which is not a particularly fast main railway line. The fastest services take two hours and one minute. Depending on exactly whereabouts in Sheffield you are leaving from, you might be able to use trains from Doncaster, ...


7

Low-cost airline transfers are non-protected even if you fly with the same airline on both legs, which is why they typically won't show up in a search. Not only that, you will have to book each leg separately (again, even if they're with the same low-cost airline). If you search with SkyScanner, tick the option "Non-protected transfers" under "Multi-part ...


7

Airlines when making schedules they take into account extra time for push back, taxi out, taxiing, taxi in and parking. The block time you see at the ticket is the time of the flight plus these things, while the actual flying time which you hear during the welcome announcement in the aircraft is purely the flying time. In addition to that, airports are ...


6

Sounds like Rome2Rio? Doesn't show you all the possibilities, mind you, but a sensible subset, and also works in trains, buses, ferries etc when applicable.


6

As the comments say, the short answer is 'we' don't generally. Airlines use many different boarding systems and boarding back-to-front is generally most popular. Mythbusters took a look at this and you'll see that there's a problem. Boarding methods that are actually faster make customers less satisfied. So an airline may choose to go front-to-back because ...


6

Since pilots can and do change routes all the time (based among other things on the weather and instructions from traffic control), it's impossible to know long in advance. Airlines also evaluate risks themselves and make changes accordingly. What you could do is use some tracking system like FlightAware to see what route a given flight has been using in ...


5

The rules are explained on the official EU website. It sometimes difficult to understand how they apply to a given situation but the page should be authoritative. In your case, my understanding is that you do need a visa to visit other European countries. To understand why, you have to make a few distinctions. Assuming you are talking about a short stay, ...


5

I don't see why there should be an issue. You are a Singaporean national and being a Malaysian Resident should not be an issue at all. Singaporean nationals are allowed to travel visa free to Hong Kong for up to 90 days, which I believe is lesser than your intended period of stay. From there, you are free to board a flight to Los Angeles (United States) ...


5

The US Customs and Border Protection branch of the Department of Homeland Security has a Prohibited and Restricted Items page. About half way down it discusses Medications. As link-only answers are frowned upon (due to stale links for one thing), I have reproduced the relevant section here: Medication Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the ...


5

Oddly enough I wasn't able to find any information on this online, I'll continue to search in case I'm able to find something. Meanwhile, I'll tell you the general rules. As you would expect, it is entirely dependent on the policy of the country in which the airline is registered. Considering that, since the drinking age in Iceland is 20, the drinking age ...


5

The closest I have seen to what you are looking for is through Kayak. Based on certain criteria that it determines, tickets with multiple legs can have different booking classes. For instance, the below Delta flight YOW-LHR-YOW has a total of 4 legs each of which can be booked in either Economy or Business. The Details tab You then move to the Fares tab ...


5

I would suggest a method as simple as any. Freeze it before you leave, put it in your check-in luggage and as soon as you reach the other side, put it in the freezer. I have done this many times with products which require refrigeration (can be milk based as well) and everything remains okay after the flight. If you wish to be extra careful or if the ...


4

The most important thing to remember about these new regulations is that they only apply at "certain overseas airports". In general, the TSA has no authority at overseas airports, and all airport security is carried out by the equivalent security group in the country the airport resides in. However at some international airports, direct flights to the US ...


4

As a tour operator, my first advice is to skip the international airfare component, as the moment you tell everyone you have a deal on Delta, Uncle Joe will say he wants United for points and cousin Ellie will say she wants LAN to use her credit card points. Plus if they are starting in different cities, it becomes a nightmare. And group rates aren't any ...


4

The exact size limits for carry-on will depend on the airline, but your sword probably exceeds most airlines'. For example: Qantas's maximum dimension for a piece of carry-on luggage on a domestic flight is 115 cm (about 3' 9") Jetstar's is 56 cm (about 1' 10")


4

If an airline is planning to open a new route, especially international routes, they will need a long list of approvals before they can operate that route. Usually this process is a bureaucratic process since it involves many organizations (civil aviation authorities, airport authorities, etc.). Anyway, airlines usually have a green light to open the route ...


4

You've basically got three options in terms of ticketing it: Multi-city trip - A single ticket for UK to Washington, Washington to SF, SF back to the UK Open-Jaw + Single - One ticket for UK to Washington, back from SF to the UK (the "open jaw"), plus a single ticket from Washington to SF Two returns - A return ticket from the UK to Washington, then ...


3

Norwegian LowFare tickets for flights within the Nordic countries can be canceled without charge within 4 hours after the booking. After that, the tickets are non-refundable. If it's any help, you can however until 30 minutes before departure change the name, destination or time by paying a fee. Depending on whether or not you have further plans to fly, that ...


3

Like most airlines, Lufthansa follow a fixed numbering schema for their flights. As per Wikipedia (in German), their current flight numbering schema, which they changed to in late 2010 includes : LH8000 – LH8515 Flüge der Lufthansa Cargo ie, Flight numbers between LH8000 and LH8515 are Flights for Lufthansa Cargo. As your flight number calls within this ...


3

Generally you cannot do this. Your baggage will be checked to your final destination. If you ask them to check it to the midway point, they will know what you are doing, and either refuse, or cancel your ticket entirely. The only two exceptions I'm aware of are: If you have a long, overnight layover, the airline will often allow you to retrieve and ...


3

Since it's a prescription ointment, it's not subject to the 100 ml / 3.4 fluid ounces rules anyway. Have the prescription label on it and clearly readable, and make sure the name matches the name on your boarding pass and in your passport, and you're fine. (This is more than you technically need because the rules just say "medications" but why give a ...



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