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25

Dealing with the fine first, according to ICAO: 5.14 Contracting States shall not fine aircraft operators in the event that arriving and in-transit persons are found to be improperly documented where aircraft operators can demonstrate that they have taken adequate precautions to ensure that these persons had complied with the documentary ...


17

As has been vigorously argued in the comments, just because it is in their T&C doesn't mean it is legal for them to have it there. I'm not a lawyer and it doesn't seem as though any lawyers are weighing in on the topic so no one can speak authoritatively on the first point. The simplest way to resolve this without getting a lawyer would be to dispute ...


9

These are razor blades, which are not permitted to be carried on board aircraft. Your Philips OneBlade is not a razor blade, but an electric shaver. These are generally always permitted as carry-on.


9

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=electric%20razor Check or Carry-on You are good to go. Even disposable razors are OK. But this: this is not good. And obviously old style straight razors which are basically a knife are an absolute no go as well.


8

They are generally allowed, however my dad has had his confiscated before. The reason they have was that it was not from a generally known brand and they couldn't tell what was inside the razorhead. I guess sometimes weird situations just occur. My blunt nail scissors were also taken, yet my compass with a huge needle was fine. And to quote Jan Doggen's ...


6

The first thing I would dispute the price of the return ticket. The T&C's, assuming they are legally binding, only allow RyanAir to recoup the cost of your return trip. The 10x price markup may the ticket price, but that does not represent the actual cost to RyanAir.


5

She'll need the same documents as anyone else. In Europe an ID will be okay, outside Europe she will need her local identification (passport, ID, ..., what is used in your country). Using her identification and her ticket, she will be able to get her boarding pass, which is used to go through security and to board the plane. She will have to go through the ...


4

If it's an interline itinerary, the airline responsible for the misconnect is mostly responsible for rebooking you. However, that is not your only option. The issuing airline can still rebook you. For instance, if you booked with American Airlines (AA) and AA issued the ticket and you have status with AA, you might have a better result calling them even ...


4

I'm sceptical that you'll find truly useful current data. I saw one site that claimed to have current data, but seemed to be non-functional. Anyway the problem is that the state of the queues now is not sufficient if you live any distance from the aiport - you need to know what they are going to be an hour or two in the future. Hence what we really need is ...


2

If you are flying to the United States of America, you should be worried. In the last 1.5 years (since our youngest was born) we already missed two flights because she has 3 first names, that usually don't fit on the ticket. Which means extra checks and longer waiting times. The USA is very strict (for good reasons) and it has to be a perfect match with the ...


1

I think there are two separate issues here. The carrier that will make sure you will get from B-C will be the airline that operates that flight. They will most likely reschedule you onto the next flight to destination C (unless rerouting you through city D is an option). The second issue is who will make sure you are fed and watered. From my personal ...



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