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32

To directly answer the title question, yes, non-business travelers can absolutely benefit from airline loyalty programs (i.e. earning points/miles as well as status.) Whether it's worth it for you in particular, though, will be extremely dependent on your particular situation and what options are available to you on the routes you normally fly, as well as ...


23

There are three things that set (some) frequent flier programs apart from other rewards programs. How important these are to you may determine whether they are worth doing. The first is "Status" which you refer to by mentioning business travellers. Never lining up, spending an hour or more less in the airport than others, waiting in the lounge eating and ...


17

My wife and I have a travel wallet/organiser that we take on all trips. It's a pretty dorky thing, but very handy. It's made of nylon material, and is large enough so a sheet of A4 folded into thirds will fit inside, has a zipper down three sides and contains several pockets. It's made by Eagle Creek and is similar to this one. We've had it ten years and ...


10

tldr: If you travel once or twice a year, on full-price airlines with frequent flyer progammes, sign up for them. But don't obsess over them, and focus on price and other benefits first. Longer answer: As always, it depends. Many (most?) budget airlines don't have a frequent flyer programme (or at least one comparable to those on full-service airlines), ...


10

After I get visa, ticket, insurance, hotel bookings etc, I scan everything, as individual pdfs. Two types of documents, one which are crucial for journey, others which are just for help. Then I make two folders on my dropbox, Important and Informative. Visa, flight ticket, hotel booking, insurance, tickets, passport info page etc pdfs go to Important. ...


8

I was walking around Narita Airport (Tokyo) today during a transit, and saw these signs outside toilets that immediately reminded me of this question. It appeared that all the toilets in Terminal 2 ( where I was) had the facilities. Feeling curious, I also took a photo of what I presumed to be these facilities in the disabled toilet. Therefore, another ...


6

I will share a recent experience of mine. We were going to go on a holiday on X-Mas and I scanned and saved all the important documents in my laptop which was with me all the time. It was connected to Dropbox and so did my Phone and I thought oh well I will have all the copies in my smart phone for quick access where I can't take out my laptop. We were ...


6

I keep on me: Passport, insurances card, wallet (id, money...) I keep on iPhone: Plane e-tickets. Hotel/accommodations reservations and confirmation emails. I keep in a craft envelop in my hand luggage duplicate printout of every confirmation I received by emails. Emails are also stored in the cloud (hotmail/gmail...) to be easily accessed in internet ...


4

For paper documents, I use a bunch of plastic folders. I group the documents in the folders depending on when I have to use them. It is possible to use different colors on the folders in order to distinguish between them. Anyway, they are semitransparent, so you will see on the text on one document which folder you have.


4

a) EASA doesn't allow unsafe airlines into their airports (like AMS) b) On top of that, Ukraine International Airlines (UIA), recertified with IOSA just last year It's as safe as any other airline if you are worried about the planes. What happened to MH17 was an outlier. You should look at some numbers instead of going "omg civil war ukraine". I recommend ...


4

It all depends on how frequently you travel and what type of travels. If you just perform 2 domestic flights every 2 years, then miles collection isn't worth... If you take more than few flights every year including some long distance flights, then it is worth, even in economy class, even with the cheapest ticket. To give you some figures, with some ...


3

For me the only way to organise these sort of things is each printout in the order you're going to use them, then throw things away as you use them. E.g. if you are going to drive to the airport, then get on a plane, then pick up a hire car when you land, to then drive to the hotel to check in I'd order the print outs like this: airport parking details ...


3

No. I know this site doesn't allow for such short answers but seriously: no. These days for a little extra legroom you are expected to pay for, Premium Economy under various names (United Economy Plus, American Airlines Main Cabin Extra, Delta Comfort+). Edit: Alaska too.


3

Unfortunately that is difficult to answer: About two years ago a large part of the industry (United, Delta) shifted the accrual from "miles flown" to "dollars spend" with a very complex set of rules. These programs are now pretty much useless for the occasional flyer. Other ways to earn miles are associated credit cards. These offer miles for dollars spend ...


3

Yes you will easily find tickets from Paris to NYC, even on last minute. They might not be really cheap but you'll find some. Here are the companies offering direct flights from Paris to NYC : American Airlines Air France Open Skies (from Orly) La Compagnie (full Business class) United And yes you can pay your tickets with cash. Just be aware that if the ...


3

It's absolutely possible to buy a ticket at the airport, you'd have good chances of being able to find one relatively fast as Paris-NYC is a very frequently serviced route. CDG being a big international airport, one of the busiest in Europe, you'll have no trouble finding an English speaker, if not Air France then surely an American airline. Counters will ...


3

No, this seems to have changed. Apparently your trucks could be weaponised. Checked luggage is rarely stolen, the bigger risk seems to be it going to the wrong airport. If you're worried about theft wrap your bag properly so it's more hassle than it is worth. People who steal normally are more interested in macbooks and other such luxuries


3

The consensus on the internet is mixed, with people who managed to carry their soldering iron in hand luggage without any problems, as well as others who had it confiscated and thrown away by TSA. However, the TSA prohibited items search engine does not provide any indication on the topic. The only US-related official source I could find is the Delta ...


2

Cabin lights interfere with vision out of the plane for flight crews. They cast a night time reflection and glare that affects them, but also affects uptake of actual navigation lights by others, such as collision and landing lights. With the cabin lights on, the collision and landing lights are difficult to pick out, especially from the air by other planes. ...


2

I have a small (A5) Moleskine notebook that I use for travelling. In the inside cover I write things that rarely change and will be the same throughout multiple trips, such as my passport number (in case it gets lost), card numbers, phone numbers for my bank (in case I need to cancel my cards), etc. Then on the individual pages I write the details of each ...


2

There are also credit cards which give out cashback in the form of air miles, however their pay-out is usually lower than simply getting a fixed cashback in dollars. Aeroplan points exchanged for international business tickets can be worth 4.5-6CPM and if you manage to find an upgradeable ticket it can be 10-12CPM. I've never seen a generic cashback ...


1

Yes it is possible! Schengen visa allows you to travel inside Schengen area by foot, boat, car, air and even more 😀😀😀


1

It appears Ukraine airlines gets relative poor reviews overall on this site called SkyTrax, a.k.a. "airlinequality.com". They have a bunch of per-airline reviews... I'm not sure how statistically sound the scores are, but it's something. Also, as @davidvc suggested, I checcked what it says about the legroom, and well, it seems to be sub par. The seat in ...


1

You are correct that EU passenger rights entitle you to a monetary compensation for long delays (on top of the duty to bring you to your destination and provide food and lodging as applicable, which was the case here). These rules apply to all flights departing from the EU, even to the US with a US carrier. In practice, there are two reasons why you are ...


1

It is largely dependent on where you are. In general, the US take a more relaxed approach to skateboards and do allow these to be brought onto flights as carry-on. However many airports in the EU see the skateboard as a "blunt instrument" and don't allow them regardless of the stance of the airline. See this article: Can You Take a Skateboard Onto an ...



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