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17

Mark already explained the why, but there's a simple but rather accurate simple approximation for jet flights: 30 min plus 1 hr per 500 mi flown Consider LAX-ABQ: 0:30 + (670/500) = 0:30 + 1:20 = 1:50 And ORD-SJC: 0:30 + (1859/500) = 0:30 + 3:43 = 4:13 The logic behind this is basically that, while take off and landing take around 20 min each, ...


16

There is no clear explicit rule regarding sleeping next to bulkheads. Why are some airlines strict about it? the usual "safety" excuse is used here and I can assure you this time the safety excuse is legitimate. In addition to that, passengers are only allowed to sit in "passenger seats", they are not even allowed to sit on crew seats, so this can be used as ...


15

First, I believe you are overreacting to the current situation, all I'm aware of is the disappearance of flight MH370, and I believe that will eventually prove to have a tragic but non-malicious explanation, with an accident, heroic pilots (and maybe a touch of government bureaucratic incompetency thrown-in during the search, not that it would have probably ...


14

There seems to be no limit as such. However if you carry more than 10'000 €, you might have to declare it depending on the country. For example in Germany, you are to declare it when orally asked to do so. For the UK on the other hand, there seems to be no need to do so. So if you consider taking more than 10'000 €, you should check the rules for the ...


14

No, you can't. I know a lot about planes and their systems and I can tell you for sure, some tissues can block the toilet. I am sure your butt is a bit heavier and bigger than some tissues. Also, some planes have a manual handle to control the flush in case it is stuck open. It happens sometime and the only bad side is not sucking people's butts, but the ...


13

In short, no, he can't realistically bring them on board: under TSA rules, semi-solid foods are considered "gels" and thus fall under the "liquids, aerosols and gels" restriction of 3 bottles x 100 ml max, and these rules are applied worldwide on international flights. You could still probably bring a few tiny containers of curry and something dry to eat ...


12

As far as I'm aware, at time of writing the only airlines that currently operate both the 787 and the A380 are British Airways and China Southern Airlines, although Etihad will be joining this rather exclusive club by the end of the year, and Korean Air, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Atlantic have all placed firm orders for both. That said, the obvious ...


12

A lot of the time in travel is the initial takeoff and climbing to altitude, as well as the descent, queueing and slowdown at the end. During this time you're not actually travelling that far, but it uses up time. Every flight has this component, and let's say for argument's sake it takes 20 minutes at the start and 20 minutes at the end. Then the rest of ...


8

Actually some airlines still do that. Air New Zealand hands out sweets/lollies (to adults and children), and I've seen it on some other airlines too in recent years - but can't remember the names off hand. There are SOME technological advancements - the 787 and A380 are meant to be better for jetlag and certainly the 787 has higher air pressure leading to ...


8

There should be no problems, unless you're on a Ukrainian passport, according to the Russian in my team here. Even then it should be fine, you may just experience some questions on your reason for your trip. Of course, as you're just continuing on to Europe, you're going to get very little attention. In terms of the city, it's far from Ukraine and the ...


8

Three are two main factors for the difference between the two flights you've listed. The first is the overhead of take-off, climb, decent and landing. These will be roughly equivalent for all flights, so are basically a fixed overhead. For the two flights you've listed, the times you've given are those published by the airline and thus include the time ...


7

Every airline will have its own policies, so contact your airline and ask. Airlines regularly transport all sorts of weird creatures, up to and including a herd of elephants, so they'll be happy to advise you how to deal with a tarantula.


7

Apart of regulations mentioned by drat, EU also has anti-money laundering laws. They apply regardless if you travel internationally or not. The EU directive 2005/60/EC "on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purpose of money laundering and terrorist financing" tries to prevent such crime by requiring banks, real estate agents ...


7

The most obvious answer is that not everyone checks luggage. I go to the counter maybe 10% of the time that I fly, as I very rarely have bags to check. Even if you are checking bags, the online check-in system allows much of the process to be completed before you arrive to drop off your bags. Depending on the airline and the flight, that could include ...


6

First, your baggage will be checked through, and if you miss the connection, Lufthansa will put you on a later flight at no extra cost. Since you arrive early and there are many flights between Munich and Paris, it will probably be only an hour or two later. You will have to go through immigration and possibly security, but at 6 AM there probably won't be ...


6

Even if you assumed that the suction of the toilet continued indefinitely, you could only get stuck if your body formed a perfect seal against the toilet rim. The three-dimensional profile of a person's backside and thighs has enough indentations to prevent the body of a person of normal proportions from forming such a seal. A person would have to be ...


5

I think the answer is the 4th of july. If you check for airfares to Frankfurt, Manchester, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, or even Tokyo. You'll see the same pattern, of sudden high fares in that period. Americans apparently like to leave the country during their independence day. Check one week before and one week later and suddenly the prices are lower.


5

You can re-enter the US if you have proof of citizenship, so that doesn't strictly require a passport -- although it may make your enter procedure more troublesome. As mentioned above, you can theoretically travel to US territories without a passport, from answers.usa.gov: For Travel to/from/between U.S. Territories, U.S. Citizens and Nationals: ...


4

Don't you hate that? ;) Sadly, no, if you miss a leg of a flight at any point on a ticket, they'll cancel ALL other legs of the flight. So unless you can get yourself to Allentown, you are unable to take that flight. It's for various reasons, logistics, regional pricing, airport taxes, but basically, no, you can't. Similar question here, with the same ...


4

It'll depend where you're flying, what type of flight (multi-leg etc), how busy the season is, and how far ahead of time you're booking. The tighter the time frame or higher the demand, the harder it is. Of course, the Flightfox hackers until a few months ago were all experts/hobbyists/searchers and you could get a dozen people all trying to beat your ...


3

Firstly, go and read this answer to understand the difference between a "layover" and a "stopover". For international flights, breaks between flights of up to 24 hours are generally considered layovers (although the exact rules vary from airline to airline), and thus are generally not charged extra. Anything over 24 hours in a location is a stop-over, and ...


3

I've always been suspect of the efficacy of high-priced noise-cancelling headphones, and recently picked up a pack of Hearos foam earplugs. Best $6.45 I've ever spent before air travel. The engine roar fades to a gentle hum, and in-flight disruptions such as seatmate chatter and cabin announcements are rendered nearly incomprehensibly quiet.


3

The legality of asking for personal information when setting up an online account varies greatly by location, and is not the least bit related to travel. In the US, for instance, it is legal to ask such information--provided the person answering the questions is at least 13 years of age, or has parental consent. In Canada, my understanding is, it is ...


3

I think there's probably not much you can do: If you have a mobile phone, you can always try to contact someone, but it seems the chances of having network coverage are rather slim. You could hope that whoever took over the plane forgot to shut down the in-flight phones and call somebody with those. Your chances of disturbing the pilot when he is in the ...


3

I worked for Fedex until 2002, and up until September 11, employees could travel on the jumpseats of company planes. This was only available to employees, and not to friends or family, so when I was single, I traveled quite a bit, even getting to Japan and Hong Kong for free. Seats were available first come, first served, and at any time you could be ...


3

My usual rule of thumb is that one mile is worth about one cent, based on the figure that 25,000 miles buys one restricted domestic round-trip which can usually be found for around $250 on the open market. One should probably discount the miles further compared to cash, since they can only be spent on one thing, can't earn interest, and can expire (as you ...


3

The Wikipedia page for the Tbilisi airport lists the airlines with flights to Tbilisi. Looks like your best Western Europe options are Rome, Amsterdam, Paris (seasonal) and Munich. There are other flights from Eastern Europe. If you're looking to get in cheap, Wizz Air (a discount airline) serves Kutaisi from various locations in Eastern Europe.


2

As a frequent traveler to India from UK. I'd consider myself have much experience about flying by both the direct flights and the cheap flights through Dubai (really is not that cheap compare to direct flights but surely you can save some money if you book your tickets quiet earlier). Working Class Flight ? Yes, it's 100% true that most of the passengers ...


2

The wikipedia page on the subject doesn't offer a lot of detail, but does provide some clues to the answer to your question. In short, engaging in sexual activities in front of other passengers is going to be illegal in most jurisdictions, and against airline policies in practically all cases. Engaging in sexual activity aboard a plane in private, such as ...


2

In short, chartering planes is almost never cheaper than flying commercially. Even in Andra's case, chartering was only "cheaper" because they were apparently in a blazing hurry; if waiting around for a day or two had been an option, they could almost certainly have found a cheaper option, or made the 700 km trek by bus or something. I once looked fairly ...



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