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39

I have direct experience with this; not actually in flight thank goodness, but in transit. My daughter was born prematurely in Shanghai last year during a short layover between Paris and Auckland. My wife and I only had limited 48-hour transit visas for China and our flight was due to depart about 10 hours after she was admitted to hospital at the beginning ...


37

It's complicated, but as always, Wikipedia has it covered. The short version is that in the vast majority of cases, the baby will inherit one or more citizenships from its parents through jus sanguinis, and nothing more. If the baby is born within the territorial limits of a country that applies jus soli, including flying overheard and within nautical ...


35

Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


32

It is as a hanger, you can hang your jacket or anything similar there. The same exact ones typically available in lavatories for passengers and in galleys for crew members. In the passengers cabin, they are usually available in first or business classes' seats and it comes with a sign: I guess they forgot to add the sign, making it harder for passenger to ...


25

It would depend on the airline and the airport/country but no matter how you buy the ticket, the next big step is what's called “checking in”. This is when the airline assigns you a seat and confirms that you will indeed be flying. In most cases, you can now check in online a few days to a few hours before departure and print the boarding pass at home (or ...


24

Such a list would not be meaningful. All airlines have wide rules to prohibit "tampering" with seats, with Knee Defenders or otherwise; you can improvise one with a well-sized bottle, after all. Those that point out the Knee Defender as banned are only making it explicit that this specific device is not allowed. More to the point, if the passenger unable ...


19

That sucks, but unfortunately all the airline is required to do is do their best to find alternate transport or offer the full refund, the 'contract of carriage' for the airline will spell this out (although they're sometimes difficult to find). You don't say who you're flying but you're in the US so I'll pick United as an example, others will be similar, ...


18

No. Restricted items may only be carried in checked luggage. However, Singapore Airlines permits you to check at least 30 kg for free, so I would suggest you simply check your carry-on luggage.


18

Knives don't go in carry-on, period. (maybe really small ones, depending on the country.) The material the knife is made of doesn't matter. Ceramic, wood (ebony will hold a nice edge), bone, flint and so on have all made fine weapons millenia before steel. If you do pack a non-metallic weapon in the darker corners of your carry-on, and they find it, you ...


17

Some airlines are quite keen on having a good social media appearance. You could go for a polite online naming & shaming approach (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Blog, etc). All you need to do is to include the facebook or twitter account of the airline in your post. As @SpaceDog says, the regulations in place are well taken care of. That doesn't mean the ...


17

Just to repeat Relaxed's excellent answer. Yash, the process is: (1) PURCHASE a ticket. These days, that is almost always online at say Expedia, or over the phone. You'll get some sort of purchase code, like XFD123HHC Note that these days, it's usually confusing since there is both an EXPEDIA code and a code from one or more AIRLINES! So, write all ...


14

In vast majority of the cases, the child will have one or more of the parents' nationalities through jus sanguinis (this is true even if the child is born in some country). As far as I know, every country in the world (except the Vatican where nationality is ex officio) has some sort of jus sanguinis system, where children born abroad to parents of that ...


14

I have done this a couple of times until two years ago - within Europe only though. And while it was never I problem, I always had to show the HDD separately etc - and in the last case was recommended (by security staff at Birmingham (BHX) airport) to buy a cheap (€15) external case, pop the HDD in that and less questions (if any) would be asked. I have ...


13

No, a standard 22" rollaboard suitcase won't fit in a CRJ overhead bin. In my experience, most airlines that fly the CRJ and similarly sized regional aircraft use a "gate check" system: luggage that is of "carry-on size" (i.e. would fit in a larger airliner's bin) but doesn't actually fit in the bin on the aircraft in use will be taken from you at the gate, ...


13

It would appear not, but there's nothing stopping us from creating one. People can edit the answer as we find more. Airlines that ban the Knee Defender Air Canada source American Airlines source Continental Airlines source Delta Airlines source Qantas source Southwest Airlines source United Airlines source Virgin Australia source WestJet source ...


12

Here's my limited understanding of limited release :) Baggage is basically divided into 3 categories: baggage that the airline will accept, baggage that it will not accept based on its rules, and baggage that it will only accept if you agree to "limited release": I.e. they will only accept the piece of baggage if you agree, in writing, to release the airline ...


12

The "enter and exit a country with the same passport" rule is not absolute. It's mostly for if you're visiting a country for a short visit, for entry/departure tracking purposes. In this case, where she naturalized, it's not only possible but expected of her to enter and leave New Zealand with a New Zealand passport, because she is now a New Zealand ...


12

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


11

I've traveled with hard disks in the past, both enclosed and unenclosed ones. I've never had a single issue with enclosed hard drives - nearly everyone seems to know what they are and understand that they pose no security hazard. The only time I've been stopped was by an elderly gentleman manning the security at JFK. He had difficulty understanding what it ...


9

Airlines often have seating blocks that are specifically for elite level frequent flyers (often marked on seat maps as "preferred" or simply shown as unavailable to non-elite flyers). If flights are not full, airlines may also choose not to seat anyone next to their highest level elite flyers, even giving them the whole row to themselves. But short of ...


9

It varies according to country. And if the country does not have a rule, there is a United Nations directive that kicks in to prevent the baby from being stateless. In the United Kingdom, your question is explicitly addressed in the British Nationality Act 1981. For the purposes of this Act a person born outside the United Kingdom aboard a ship or ...


8

Limited Releases are applied to baggage that the airline considers to be at higher risk for damage during flights and transfers. They often apply it to large sporting goods, fragile items, poorly packed items, all ready damaged items and others. Due to the low weight of your bag vs its size, they likely were afraid that it would be fragile and therefore ...


8

No. Firstly, note that you'll likely be required to get a visa at the border with the US, even though you're in the visa-waiver countries for ESTA - it apparently only counts for flights, or within 90 days of a flight into the US if arriving by land(!) as I found out, twice. However, leaving the country there's not even a passport check - you simply need ...


8

On the page for excess baggage charges there's a separate section For seamen traveling within Europe which strongly suggests that's what your "Marine" refers to - a seaman.


8

Turns out, it is now possible, thanks to a post I found on Wikivoyage. A sample itinerary, that they provide, beginning in London: **London** to Barcelona on Vueling Barcelona to Casablanca on Vueling Casablanca to Istanbul on Air Arabia Maroc Istanbul to Dubai on Flydubai Dubai to Kathmandu on Flydubai Kathmandu to Kuala Lumpur on Air Asia X Kuala Lumpur ...


7

I would suggest a method as simple as any. Freeze it before you leave, put it in your check-in luggage and as soon as you reach the other side, put it in the freezer. I have done this many times with products which require refrigeration (can be milk based as well) and everything remains okay after the flight. If you wish to be extra careful or if the ...


7

Downgrading a flight maybe possible. It would depend on whether your ticketed fare allows you to do that. However, you may have issues if it was bought by a company as they may have used their corporate accounts and refunds (and partials) would go there. Even if it didn't they would notice they received less corporate air miles (or equivalent depending on ...


7

For the minimal volume is too loud problem any headphones with an inline analog volume adjuster will work. Basically these allow you to control the volume between zero (or close) and whatever the input level is. You can also get adapters that do this, here's the first one I found: http://www.amazon.com/Koss-155954-VC20-Volume-Control/dp/B00001P4XH Note -- ...


6

Generally speaking travel documents for travelling within Schengen zone are: passport or EU/EEA national ID card. Officially none other documents are accepted, however some airlines might be more relaxed in their requirements. RyanAir is not one of these airlines, and RyanAir will not let you travel with just residency permit (I'm also speaking from personal ...


6

It is surely acceptable to ask staff. However, I know from experience that it is not uncommon in Atlanta that a member of the airline staff will be waiting at the gate asking everyone if they have connecting flights. This is the right person to ask. If I recall correctly, I also got a ticket there for the immigration fast lane. Should there be a line at ...



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