Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

120

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


30

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


20

In most juristictions that operate with something approaching sanity, someone is liable for accidental damage in the following three cases: They caused the damage deliberately or with "blameworthy carelessness". They have entered into a contract where they explicitly accept to be responsible for the risk. The law contains an explicit exception for the ...


11

You asked Why should the airline care if I depart on Tuesday and return Thursday of the same week, or the next week? and you answered: because business travelers will pay more. That's all there is to it. It's called price discrimination and it's practiced by just about any business that can get away with it -- all the more so in competitive ...


10

Check in counter and aircraft parking gates at airports are usually provided in as copious quantity as is possible for the space. This allows for maximum usage during peak arrival/departing times slots and allows space for expansion in terms of number of flights/airlines serving the airport. Airlines that make frequent flights to an airport tend to have ...


8

You would be best to check the airline's booking rules and term of carriage before you start making your reservation. Quite a few airlines require that the card be shown to verify its validity for online bookings. If they do, then you can't use a virtual card. Virtual cards are designed to offer security in transactions where you are unsure of the safety ...


8

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


8

Airlines tend to charge full fare for last minute bookings, rather than discounting it to try and fill one more seat. The stereotypical last minute booking is from a business person, who has to be there and is flying on someone else's dime, hence doesn't mind paying whatever is asked. So there is no real motivation to discount the fares. The number of ...


8

Short answer: if both flights have the same flight number, you are probably staying on the same plane. If the flight number changes, you are connecting to a different aircraft. Alternate answer: if the airline told you what city you are changing in and told you what time you land and take off in that city, you are connecting to a different aircraft. In the ...


7

According to cheapair.com, the price starts to skyrocket 30 days before the departure date. Quoting it, [Within 29 days] the increase began to accelerate and once you were within 14 days the fares really shot up dramatically. Their graph:


7

Supposition on my part but aircraft have to be used intensively or competition may force the airline out of business. This means turn-around times as short as possible. I would hope that while you are held back from boarding all kinds of checks are taking place - equipment functioning, brochures replenished, antimacassars tidy, left luggage and so forth - ...


7

One major drawback with using third party booking websites (especially for air) is that there is a time lag between when they queried the airline reservation system and when your booking request is submitted. During this time lag, the seat could be sold, the airline could load new fares, etc. When you search for fares, the airline systems return what is ...


6

A quick search from the capitals of the three countries to NYC or MIA shows no direct flights. Almost all of them stop in Morocco or somewhere in Europe, before continuing on to the US. However, and ignoring how effective a travel ban may or may not be on stopping Ebola, what it would consist of is written up quite well in this National Geographic article. ...


6

It's not hard to identify flights which may fly over the Grand Canyon— but finding out which ones definitely will, and whether or not you will have a view if you take one, are a different story. With some trial and error, you can find flights that pass over the area on any of the websites that offer flight tracking, like FlightAware.com. Grand Canyon ...


6

If these were domestic flights (flights where the start and finish are within the same country) then it's possible that they hardly stop anyone. Drug smuggling would be a non-issue because you're not crossing an international border. Security at the arrival end does not need to check that you're not a terrorist who might blow up the plane, because you've ...


5

As a whole airfares do not increase, rather available fare classes sell out or become invalid. On average, a economy section can have 4 to 8 fare classes available, with a limited number of spaces available in each class. As the cheaper spaces get sold, then the reservation system shows the next higher fare that is still available. In years past, a fair ...


5

Normally they don't "select my name from a list", they enter the data you give them: your name, destination, flight number (any or all) and the system looks up your booking. The counter agent then reviews your booking, checking destination, special requests, booking notes. And then they start to check you in. Seat preselected? Save some time. Not ...


5

I wouldn't worry about Ebola in India, and neither does the Economist. There is a small Indian diaspora in West Africa (far smaller than the one in East Africa, mind you), but compared to India's sheer population the amount of passengers traveling between the two is pretty minuscule. Now add in that Ebola transmission requires direct contact with a ...


5

KLM is likely not tell you much in their reply, other than telling you to go online or call, as availability changes from minute to minute and what they show now is likely to be different when you email them back later. Your best bet is to log into your current booking and use the change the flight options. You will be able to bail out before any change is ...


5

The basic problem here is threefold: you're traveling at a very busy time of year (between Christmas and New Year), you're asking for a one-way flight (almost always proportionally much more expensive than a return), and the kicker, you're asking for a guaranteed connection, which is all flight search engines will ever return you; otherwise they can't sell ...


5

You have the moral advantage when fighting for the armrest. The person on the aisle or window has at least one uncontested armrest already. There's a slightly higher chance that the seat in front of you and/or behind you will be unoccupied. If in front, you don't have to worry about them putting their chair back. If behind, then you don't have to worry ...


5

No, most airlines would not allow you to check baggage to B in this circumstance. One exception... if B->C is domestic you might HAVE to take your luggage off at B to clear customs. (For example if you're talking about LHR-JFK-LAX you will get your luggage at JFK even if it's "checked" to LAX) In some circumstances, airlines might allow you to book a ...


5

It's enough time if all goes according to plan. However, you've got very little buffer if anything goes wrong, and going via another airport means the odds of something going wrong are multiplied. Personally, I would not risk it. Unfortunately your options are limited here. GoAir is a low-cost carrier and you've booked your connecting international ...


5

If the airline found the bag AND you provided a specific delivery address when you filed the lost bag report, then they are responsible for delivering the bag to you at that address. If the airline found the bag, but you did not specify a alternate delivery address (ie you were still traveling or such), then they are responsible for informing you (which ...


4

There are no direct flights from those 3 countries. There are direct flights from Senegal and Nigeria, and these 2 countries have had a few cases of Ebola, but they are all of people who were in contact with people who've come from the 3 outbreak countries, the transmission is under control, and it's not spreading in the general population. Source: ...


4

Sometimes, sometimes not. Airlines schedule their aircraft according to complex algorithms, and there's no attempt to make them match flight numbers. They may find it efficient to use the same aircraft to run the same flight day after day, or perhaps a more complicated schedule is more efficient. For a route like Brussels-Washington, it would be unlikely ...


4

Back in the good old days you would arrive at the airport, walk directly from the parking lot to the aircraft, the co-pilot would heave your bags into the hold, the steward would take your ticket and you climb up the stairs. Then air travel became popular. Cancellations, rebookings, overbookings etc. meant the pre-departure arrival time had to increase. ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


4

I am afraid the answer is going to be “it depends”. With low cost airlines at least, the increase is gradual and it's not uncommon to see markedly lower prices for flights at inconvenient times. So a ticket on such a flight might still be available at a given price a week out whereas similar tickets for a more attractive flight on the same day disappeared a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible