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23

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


21

I was on a plane from UK to USA that had to land at an alternate airport in the US due to a medical emergency. Several people wished to disembark and were told no for several reasons. 1st was the fact that the airport we had landed at was a small regional one and had no immigration, 2nd was that the plane was the wrong size for the facilities available at ...


19

No. At an unplanned refuelling stop, the crew will be focused exclusively on landing, getting fuel on board, and taking off again. There will not be disembarkation services, including no jet bridge, no ramp bus, no barriers set up to guide you to immigration, etc. Unless there is a medical emergency, you're not getting off the plane.


16

Yes, there is a code for the Bay Area: QSF, which covers SFO, OAK and SJC. These are called "Metropolitan area airport codes", and Wikivoyage has the full list. However, there's an important caveat: unlike "NYC", this particular code is not actually an IATA code, it's just convenient shorthand for some airline booking systems (GDS). "QSF" will thus work ...


12

Yes, and No. Flight numbers do frequently get used for multiple flights on the same day. For example today UA712 is used for both a Chicago to San Diego flight and a subsequent San Diego to San Francisco flight. In this case, both of these flights used the same aircraft (an Airbus A320, United "ship" number 4616). On Saturday, UA338 will fly from Salt ...


12

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


11

First off, do you have a diagnosis from your doctor, with a letter stating this? It could be useful, and I'll get to that. If you have time before the flight to get a letter, and potentially a prescription, the doctor may have some suggestions or medicine to help you cope with the flight - something to relax you. Get to the airport early, giving yourself ...


10

Checked bags may be opened during screening. So the plastic wrap would be removed. You could get a duffel bag with a draw string and put your backpack in it. That would offer more protection then a plastic bag, but it would take some room in your backpack to carry around when your not using the duffel. The TSA's site has some tips.


7

The best option to get cheap flights once a year over the course of five years is--perhaps surprisingly--simple: Buy the cheapest tickets you can find at the time, with plenty of advance notice (about two months). You might be able to do slightly better if you chase after rewards programs and frequent flier miles and all that, but one pair of return ...


6

The flight number has basically two parts, the first two characters identify the airline selling the flight and the remaining digits are the airline's flight identifier. The first two digits are the IATA assigned airline code, which were originally based on the airlines name, ie: BA - British Airways, DL - Delta, etc. But due to the proliferation of ...


6

Airline loyalty systems are multifaceted in their benefits, and which program to choose varies a great deal depending on what kinds of rewards you prefer, which airline you take, which fares you purchase, and which routes you fly. However, frequent flyer programs are designed to get you to spend more money with a particular airline by providing extra ...


6

The "Why" is simple: airlines who stopped offering free standby and instead offered guaranteed seats on a different flight for a change fee saw an increase in revenue from doing that, and so continue to do it. As for why it increases their revenue, there are four upsides: first, the fee itself. $100, $200 - in a time of $99 cheapest fares, the fee itself ...


5

Assuming you are flying on a regular scheduled flight (clearly, you are), it is always included in the final price of the ticket. It is paid for by the operator (i.e. the airline). Source: https://www.gov.uk/pay-air-passenger-duty.


5

There are two levels of turbulence when it comes to the seat belt light. With minor turbulence the captain will turn on the seat belt sign and ask passengers to be seated. Cabin crew will be able to continue their duties (though they will sit down if it gets rougher). With severe turbulence, the captain will turn on the seat belt light and tell everyone ...


5

I believe the reason that the Indian consulate requires proof of valid status to issue you a passport, is because they are trying to prevent people who have naturalized in the U.S., and thus have automatically lost Indian citizenship, from still pretending to be Indian citizens. Having proof of valid non-citizen status proves that you currently (or recently) ...


4

While there is no international legal agreement as to a specific altitude at which space begins, international law defines the lower boundary of space as the lowest perigee attainable by an orbiting space vehicle. The term "orbiting" implies unpowered flight, which given atmospheric drag means an altitude of around 150 kilometres. Alternatively, the Karman ...


4

From my experience, after traveling with a lot of different sizes of Camera gear: The airlines do not want you to check in your camera gear. If something gets damaged, it always gets messy and expensive. Not only do they face arguments about the gear itself, but also often about the whole value of the trip since the photographer basically goes to a location ...


4

The definition of "small camera bag" is kept vague on purpose, to leave the airline some wiggle room when applying the rule. I would say a safe assumption would be considering a "small camera bag" any bag small enough not to be considered an extra piece of carry-on luggage. I have successfully travelled with the camera bag pictured below: whose technical ...


4

I don't think that there are precise rules. I always have my DSLR in a small camera bag with me and never had a problem. A Nikon D7100 with a 18-200mm objective in a bag similar to the one in the picture (18.5 x 16 x 22.5 cm):


4

This apparently happens a lot (or at least between the countries I travel often) in AirAsia. When the captain turns the seat belt sign on, that doesn't mean he or she is expecting turbulence by a 100% chance. It's just that his/her instincts and monitors show that there could be a turbulence. I have used the washroom many times when the seat belt sign is ...


4

So you want to watch a great movie strapped to a uncomfortable seat, while the person in front of you reclines his seat and crushes your feet, on a small crappy screen, interrupted by PA announcements, with babies crying, people coughing and farting and constant engine sound in the background. The answer is no, not yet. You have to wait a few more months, ...


4

Sometimes I get the same problem where I'm unable to perform this online; what I do -  I call directly to the airline (have your PNR/ticket number ready) and ask to have your seat assignment. It will be wise if you know the type of airplane before so you can get visualization about the layout). Also, when you get your seat assignment over the phone - ask to ...


4

The 'problem' (or feature, depending on your timing) with flightfox, darjeelin and others is that you're relying mostly on part-time experts looking for flights for you. So if you pick the wrong time, it may take a while to get someone on to look at it for you. Also, and I found this especially with flightfox when I was an expert there, complex flights ...


4

You need to bring your passport, which is the only TSA-approved foreign ID for flying in the US. And that's it, really. On booking, you'll be asked for name, age and contact details, but none of this is checked or verified. At the airport, all they'll do is verify that the name on your ticket matches the name on your ID.


4

I don't think so. The airline charges you because sometimes they cannot sell the empty seats that you "reserved". You could try to see the costs of canceling and buying new tickets, but you're really in an ethical grey area here. Other options would be calling the airline and asking them if you can just change your flight. The ticketing technique ...


4

http://www.edreams.com/offers/flights/airline/ has some user reviews of airlines, but also check-in and baggage information for the major companies. Another site with such information is SeatGuru: http://www.seatguru.com/browseairlines/browseairlines.php http://www.airline-baggage-fees.com has useful information, but only for baggages. The most reliable ...


4

It's fairly common for a single flight number to cover multiple flight segments (legs): for example, Qantas flight 1 (QF1) is both Sydney to Dubai and Dubai to London. In the US, it's apparently common to use the same flight number on separate services flown by separate planes, leading to situations like yours. I don't think this serves any practical ...


4

I don't think its feasible to know all of this information because a lot of the stuff you are searching for (wifi, power supply) are not dependent on the flight, but rather the airplane being used on that flight (and that is subject to change without any notification). You might be booked on a 777 for Flight A, but they have to change the aircraft to a ...


4

This seems quite simple. India wants proof of your status in the USA, so get it for them. Walk into US immigration, explain what's happening, and get a letter from them declaring your status as H1B, about to expire, not being renewed, and that the US Government would appreciate it if you departed the country before a particular date. Signed, stamped, with a ...


4

You can also use the (paying) plastic wrapping services that are often found in the airport terminal. This will ensure that all straps, handles, etc do not protrude, and thus will not be caught in the tapis roulant. If TSA/Security or whoever needs to access your bag, they will cut through the wrapping and should then replace it with their own heavy-duty ...



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