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0

"Trust but verify." If you're traveling during a "real" off season, occupancy rates will be lower than usual. But there may be something peculiar to that location (a conference, sports event, etc.) that nullifies this. The "safe" way to play this game is to monitor the hotel vacancy rates for your target dates over the internet in advance. If somehow, ...


2

1 Dorset Mudeford is famous for its row of colourful huts - and for the prices some of them have fetched, upwards of £100,000 - it also has some of the few beach huts you can actually sleep in, including Needleview, which sleeps four in two singles and a bunk. There's a kitchen with gas burner, grill and fridge, and the use of nearby loos and showers.


3

This doesn't directly answer the question, but it's too long for a comment. If it's out of place, feel free to delete. As others have said, off-season rooms are usually available without a reservation (and often below normal/advertised rates, through sites like booking.com, priceline, etc). But one strategy you might consider employing is taking advantage ...


6

Generally yes, but you need to be aware that the local definition of "Off Season" can vary quite a bit. Most places have really busy times that you may not be aware off. Boston, for example, has "Marathon" in mid April and "College Graduation" in mid to end May where it's almost impossible to get a room and where rooms are quite expensive.


5

Basically, yes. Traveling out of season you do not need to make reservations. But if you travel in the low/closed season you might find many places closed and the few that are open very popular and at times booked out when you want to stay. And when weekdays are low season already, the weekends might still be mid or even high season. Further more, you need ...


1

I think the consumables in the rooms are well covered in the other answers. The thing I miss in most of them is the food at breakfast (and maybe other buffets.) In Norway there are extensive breakfast buffets in hostels, when I was there most of those had a notice that you could eat as much as you liked but were not allowed to take food out of the room. ...


-1

You can take away daily consumables, which you have used and which cannot be used again or given to others like soap, shampoos, shaving kit, sponges etc. and you can also take pens, magazines and note pads. I do suggest to take away towels if it's necessary during your travel, because some of the hotels consider it as scrap. They won't mind taking that with ...


4

I found the above answers to be unclear. So: 1) You can and should take as many pairs of the cheap slippers as you can grab (the single-use ones with a logo, wrapped in plastic). These are really handy and cool! 2) You can and should (if for some reason you want to) take all the toiletries: that is to say the small bottles of shampoo, etc., and similarly ...


2

There are a lot of online resources about altitude sickness prevention. Like TripAdvisor or the NHS (National Health Services from the UK government). They all give similar advices, which include, among others: Avoid strenuous activities in the first 24/48 hours Avoid alcohol and nicotine Hydrate yourself more often than you're used to. I couldn't find an ...


4

Some days will be quite hot in Paris in July, and if you're used to living with AC it will be an adjustment. I stayed in Paris for a month last July and had to get used to sleeping with a single light sheet, moving as little as possible, and waking up sweaty. Old buildings will likely have poor ventilation, to compound the matter.


1

There are actually many cheaper options in Probolinggo than the ones visible on internet or in lonely planet Indonesia (edition 2013). I stayed in a guesthouse for 80'000 IDR per night, for a double bedroom with shower (cold water only). It was clean, not far from the train station, and staff was nice. The guesthouse is called "female guesthouse", although ...


0

I went there in the summer for a couple of nights and I slept under a kiosk, right outside a church. 100% free! :D I have done this in Greece quite often. For some reason I get the feeling of the area that says me if it's safe or not. Still alive!


1

To go as smoothly as possible, I would book into one of the hotels close to Heathrow that has a regular bus to/from the airport. Then after spending time in central London, I would travel to Heathrow on the tube after 8pm, so you get a seat. Then get the bus to the hotel and the bus back from the hotel the next day. (The last tube is late enough to ...


1

For this situation the long term cancelation is completely unfair and it is baffling as to why AirBnb has left it unchanged for so long. It would make a lot more sense to create something like a "semi-long-term policy" for stays less than 60 days or so to be based on weeks not months. For example, if you cancelled on a 28 day stay a month before checkin ...


2

It would be useful to know when are you planning on travelling, summer is obviously high season, not to mention public holidays which push prices up. That said I found this website which has camping and chalets in your range, according to their website they're close to the Orléans Express line. There's also a useful clickable map on Info Gaspésie's ...



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