Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

58

Here are some of the main signs I would look out for to decide if a review is fake. (note: updated with some points taken from a study on the matter) Overly hyped. While it is certainly possible that someone had an amazing time, the more hyped the review looks the more likely it is fake. "Fake reviewers tend to overdo “self-referencing”, that is, they ...


45

Taking Complimentaries Home I would say that it all boils down to how cheap you want to look, in the eyes of the hotel management. If you don't care, and probably you shouldn't, then there are some things you can take with you upon check-out. Taking Consumables As a general rule I would say: you can take anything that is single-serving. For the purpose ...


39

I look at reviews that are “middle of the road” e.g. 2 or 3 star. I then choose a hotel when the reviews complain about things I don’t care about. E.g. a review saying that “the hotel bar closes at 10 pm and does not have any music” is a positive review for me, even if the reviewer gave the hotel 2 stars because of it. A fake review posted by the hotel ...


23

Here's a story about a study done by researchers who hired freelance writers to write fake positive reviews, asked judges to tell them apart from real ones (they couldn't) and then did a statistical analysis. According to them, typical properties of fake reviews are: A direct mention of the place where somebody stayed Lots of adverbs like 'really' and ...


19

Utilize hotels.com or other "black-out date" wholesalers and discounters. They purchase rooms in bulk at a discounted rate and mark them up for a profit. As occupancy becomes scarce they will hold rooms back for the last minute premium. The room allocations they have will not be available to the hotel front desk or central reservations. Hotel front desks ...


18

Rick Steves has a post on this and his answer comes down to: Interpret hoteliers’ reticence as “I have lots of good furniture and fine floors in this room, and I don’t want your drippy laundry ruining things.” But as long as you wash carefully and are respectful of the room, go right ahead. It's also possible they want to save on water, but then ...


14

In my opinion the best filter for fake reviews is training, by writing some real reviews yourself. I also make a habit of contradicting previous reviews quite explicitly if I disagree. Either way the method is never foolproof. If I went to a hotel with quite some remarkable reviews, only to regret it afterwards, it wouldn't be the first time. Not because ...


13

I actually think I have the perfect thing for you. I made this site to check for when any booked hotels open up, and send you an email/text when it does: Hotel Room Alerts Full disclosure obviously, I'm obviously the creator of the site. You should add all the hotels that are in that area, and when any of them have an opening, it will notify you right ...


13

Things like towels, bathrobes and slippers are not there to be taken, they are to be left behind. Small toiletries like soap, shampoo, lotions, toothbrush are yours to keep if you so desire. And while hotels assume a single guest will use only one set, they won't chase you down if you take the second set.


10

One of the most beautiful place to temple lodging is Koyasan which is close to Kyoto. Different temples offer lodging with a traditional meal included. They also offer the opportunity to pray with the monks early in the morning (5 a.m.) and before dinner. In order to reach Koyasan from Kyoto you have to take a train to Osaka (Namba station) and from there ...


10

It is not likely that there is a method that work perfectly, but there are steps that you can take that will help. If I find ANY reviews which are obviously faked I would be very unlikely to stay at the hotel. If they are prepared to lie to create a positive image, or need to do so, they are probably suspect in other areas as well. When there are a range of ...


9

No particularly clever schemes, I'm afraid. Those hotels that have waiting lists will add you if you call or mail them; those that don't, will not. I'd look into alternatives like Airbnb that will often have availability even when hotels are full. Or, if you're feeling like Austin Powers, you can wait until just before you arrive and then try your luck ...


8

No, there is no "Europe-wide rule". HI: Do Age limits exist? Youth Hostels are open to everyone. However age limits may apply for children in some places - check with the Hostel. Young people may be given priority when the hostel is nearly full. Practices will vary from country to country and even hostel to hostel. For example, in Finland ...


8

If you are interested in meeting people I would definitely suggest CouchSurfing. As an Iranian I can assure you they'd love to provide host, specially to foreigners . You can find many CouchSurfers in big cities. Here is just a sample search for Tehran. Unfortunately, in Iran there are not (yet) many good hostels as you can find in Europe. And you ...


8

Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing), This is true, and Morocco is one of the strictest countries in this regard! Unlike Tunisia, Lebanon or Syria for example. So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon, Not ...


7

Yup, Okinawa has lots of cheap lodgings, it's where all the Japanese hippies, surfers and dropouts go to hang out. ゲストハウス (gesutohausu, "guesthouse") and 安宿 (yasuyado, "cheap inn") are the usual terms. ¥1000/night is largely a Naha thing though, it's not going to be easy to find that elsewhere in Okinawa. Here's a handy listing of (close to?) all ...


7

Riders' houses are super-budget dorms, often run on a non-commercial hobbyist or community-supported basis, and not uncommonly entirely free. As the name says, the primary audience is bikers, both motorized and pedal-powered, but anybody is welcome. However, as they've often located in places that are hard to impossible to reach by public transport ...


7

This turns out to be surprisingly nuanced. In short, while officially discouraged, short-term rentals are legal, or at least not illegal, in Singapore. The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA), the Singapore government body responsible for private housing, makes it quite clear that: Private residential properties or their rooms within the premises ...


7

As there is a wide variety in things that can theoretically be taken from a hotel room, I'll restrict this answer to the items listed in the question (and to my limited experience in countries): So for example you can get towels, slippers, candies, pens, shampoos, shaving kits, sponges, ... Towels are usually exchanged during your stay, and reused ...


7

INSIDER INFORMATION: (I was front desk manager in luxury hotel) Take Consumables - Shampoo/ opened soaps /used box of paper towels etc Newspapers, marketing catalogs, guides, promotional materials placed by biz houses Perishable food items which will be considered unusable even if you leave it there Most items for kids - hotels know that it is very hard ...


6

The most cost effective will be a youth hostel. You can find them just by doing a research on Google or on travel website such as Expedia, Hotels.com, etc. The outskirts of the city will be less expensive than the center of London but check on TFL for the travel card price before taking a "far away from the center" place to stay !


6

Yes, but ... Further searching has led me to a few discoveries. In a previous question about Macau, Ankur tells us about one hostel, Augusters Lodge there that had to close down. Then I found an article on About.com, Top Three Macau Hostels by Rory Boland. It's obviously not up-to-date as it lists the aforementioned former hostel, but also two more: San ...


6

Most hotels require all guests staying in the room to be registered, and will charge extra if more than the set number of guests is registered for the room. So you could register your sister and (I presume her) husband, however you could likely need to pay extra for the 3 guests - even though there will not be 3 guests there at the same time. Alternatively ...


6

Here's a technique that's risky - but can work. Wear a suit, carry a "professional" looking suitcase. Go up to the front desk and try to check in. Inevitably, they won't have a record of your booking. Claim that your company's travel desk made the booking - you've flown all the way over from wherever for a big conference with Name of major local employer. ...


6

There is one more issue. If you wash something in the sink, it's wet afterwards (how surprising!). Now, if something is wet, it will need to dry. During the drying process, it will create a lot of humidity. Of course, taking a shower and drying your towel also creates a lot of humidity, but doing laundry just puts an extra dimension to it. Unless you hang ...


6

Hostels Find Another Guest to Replace You I was once in a similar situation: I booked a hostel for a week and had to leave after a few days. The hostel basically said they would refund the nights I did not spend there, if and only if they managed to find someone else to replace me. Luckily enough they did, and I got part of my money back. This is of ...


5

This is definitely possible. I grew up in the Alps and I can think of at least a dozen places like that. The problem is that most of them are privately owned and it might not be so easy to get access to one. There is a website about renting such huts in Switzerland, but unfortunately the listings are only in German. Note that even if some of the house is ...


5

The standard online Chinese travel agents (elong, ctrip) seem to be able to make bookings in Dandong, starting from Y160 (USD 26) or so for two. I realize you can get cheaper dives in many places, but doesn't that answer the question adequately? The government probably wants a bit better control in a sensitive border area.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible