Hot answers tagged

69

Here are some of the main signs I would look out for to decide if a review is fake. (note: updated with some points taken from a study on the matter) Overly hyped. While it is certainly possible that someone had an amazing time, the more hyped the review looks the more likely it is fake. "Fake reviewers tend to overdo “self-referencing”, that is, they ...


56

Taking Complimentaries Home I would say that it all boils down to how cheap you want to look, in the eyes of the hotel management. If you don't care, and probably you shouldn't, then there are some things you can take with you upon check-out. Taking Consumables As a general rule I would say: you can take anything that is single-serving. For the purpose ...


46

I look at reviews that are “middle of the road” e.g. 2 or 3 star. I then choose a hotel when the reviews complain about things I don’t care about. E.g. a review saying that “the hotel bar closes at 10 pm and does not have any music” is a positive review for me, even if the reviewer gave the hotel 2 stars because of it. A fake review posted by the hotel ...


32

In my opinion Airbnb is nothing but a short-let provider. Yes people do rent out their spare rooms, and thus welcome you in their house. But they do so in exchange for money, very much like a hotel, or a bed-and-breakfast, would do. In that sense I don't think tipping is necessary. If you want to show appreciation to an excellent host, the best way to do ...


25

Well I'm a bit of a sub-expert on this, having worked nine years in the hostelling industry and encountering them as a traveller once in India. There's a bit of a dirty little secret in the hospitality industry about just how bad the bed bug problem has been for the past few years. Apparently all the big/expensive hotel chains have been having problems - it'...


24

Here's a story about a study done by researchers who hired freelance writers to write fake positive reviews, asked judges to tell them apart from real ones (they couldn't) and then did a statistical analysis. According to them, typical properties of fake reviews are: A direct mention of the place where somebody stayed Lots of adverbs like 'really' and '...


23

I live in the Tel Aviv area, and I can confirm that most of Israel is easily accessible from there. I have no idea what tourist infrastructure exists in the Palestinian Authority area, if any, and how to get there from Tel Aviv. Tel Aviv is something like Miami, in that attractions include the beach and a lively nightlife, while Jerusalem has a lot more ...


23

No you don't all need an account. Only one (the one who makes the booking) is enough. Source: I have often stayed at Airbnbs together with other people (either as the one who made the booking or accompanying) and no multiple accounts were necessary. You only need to specify the number of guests, you wouldn't even need to give their emails. Since you get ...


22

Rick Steves has a post on this and his answer comes down to: Interpret hoteliers’ reticence as “I have lots of good furniture and fine floors in this room, and I don’t want your drippy laundry ruining things.” But as long as you wash carefully and are respectful of the room, go right ahead. It's also possible they want to save on water, but then ...


21

It's usually a number for how many people the place can accommodate. It's NOT always an indication of the number of beds. (Dictionary defintion - number 7 in this case): to accommodate for sleeping; have sleeping accommodations for For example, a 2 bedroom apartment I'm staying in during August sleeps arguably 8, but only has 4 beds - a double, a ...


20

Honestly, I would stick with couchsurfing. I hate to sound like the news and say craig's list can be dangerous, but I know some people that have had bad experiences... really bad experiences. I would say stick with a site that validates users. If you don't mind working, you can always go with somethign like WWOOF. Also, working in a hostel is usually a ...


20

As an American who just recently traveled to Israel for the first time with a former Israeli, my impression is that you should stay in Jerusalem. We took a bus that only took about 45 minutes from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. They are very close together. And Jerusalem was much more interesting to me from a tourist perspective (i.e. the rich history and ...


20

Utilize hotels.com or other "black-out date" wholesalers and discounters. They purchase rooms in bulk at a discounted rate and mark them up for a profit. As occupancy becomes scarce they will hold rooms back for the last minute premium. The room allocations they have will not be available to the hotel front desk or central reservations. Hotel front desks ...


20

Many small hotels (self-described as minshuku or ryokan) are not bookable through the Internet. Such hotels often have availability even long after all of the Internet-bookable options have sold out. Booking is made by phone. Obviously, this require knowing some Japanese, as very few have English-speaking staff. The main difficulty is to find these small ...


17

As so often, the answer is a combination of local tradition and economic reality. Most UK people who travel to the cottages are going for the whole week, the places which rent them out are geared to that and do not want to rent them out for shorter periods as that will result in the cottages standing empty, unpaid, for times that are too short for others to ...


17

The answer to all three of your questions is "It depends". The only way you will get an answer is by asking the owner directly. If it's beoing offered on AirBNB, then my assumption is that it is being offered much the same as any holiday rental. In that sense, the answer to 1. can be inferred from if it is advertised as "whole property" or "private room". 2 ...


16

This "feature" is called a "Security locker" or "In-room safe" (the latter usually being available in proper hotels, not hostels). You can filter based on that parameter on Hostelworld, for example: Usually the lockers will look something like this: They're divided into several types, ranging in their level of security: In-room safes, a metal box ...


15

I actually think I have the perfect thing for you. I made this site to check for when any booked hotels open up, and send you an email/text when it does: Hotel Room Alerts Full disclosure, I'm the creator of the site. You should add all the hotels that are in that area, and when any of them have an opening, it will notify you right away. Make sure you put ...


14

While I can't really help with a flight+hotel combo, however, I can suggest flightfox.com (not affiliated, I just compete there) for the flights. You're able to customise your request, so you could potentially ask for people to find you the cheapest double flight (yours and hers) for you to meet up. It'd be an interesting contest at least...just a thought. ...


14

One of the most infamous ones is the prison in La Paz, Bolivia - the San Pedro prison. This prison was made famous in the book "Marching Powder". (source: Wikipedia) This prison is basically run by the prisoners, and even the guards don't enter the prison. Tourists aren't "meant" to go in, but there's a way, for sure. Obviously, you do this at your own ...


14

Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing), This is true, and Morocco is one of the strictest countries in this regard! Unlike Tunisia, Lebanon or Syria for example. So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon, Not really ...


14

Things like towels, bathrobes and slippers are not there to be taken, they are to be left behind. Small toiletries like soap, shampoo, lotions, toothbrush are yours to keep if you so desire. And while hotels assume a single guest will use only one set, they won't chase you down if you take the second set.


14

Why do they want item 3? Almost certaily so they can charge your card either now or in the future, and probably whether you show up or not. You should check what the cancellation terms etc are for this stay. You should also read this question, and note some of the risks involved in just emailing out your credit card details. As for ensuring the offer of ...


14

You certainly have more than one option, when it comes to leaving your stuff so you can move around freely: You'd definitely want to ask to the personnel of your accomodation (hotel, hostel, apartment, etc.) if they can store your luggage until you are ready to leave. Most of the accomodations offer this kind of service and usually have a locked room, ...


13

There's little you can do, apart from the obvious, depending how thorough you want to be: Check the photos - see if it shows the dorms and the layout Check the reviews, hopefully you left a review about it, and others may have too. Email them - ask the layout of the room and any other suitable questions. Or even call them - a friendly chat will also let ...


13

Oddly, the legality depends on the country. In the UK for example, it's a civil offense against the landowner, but not illegal. And as an added bonus, if you 'live' there for 10 years, you can claim ownership! (This has actually happened). More often than not, it's homeless people that squat, rather than travellers. It's so common in the UK, that there's ...


13

Paddington is fine - not only that, it's even smart! You have several options from there: the Heathrow Express. 15 min to the airport. They say there's that length transfer, but if you're in a hurry you'll beat that. naturally transport fails. If the Express is down, sometimes the regular trains are still running overground. This only takes about 10 ...


12

No. Stay in Tel-Aviv to visit Tel-Aviv and then move on. Tel-Aviv is a cool city, the coolest in Israel, but exploring the whole country from there is cumbersome. One of the highlights in Israel is Jersualem. Visiting Jerusalem takes some days. This means that you have to travel several times back and forth along the same road. The roads are congested. You ...


12

We stayed in a kibbutz at Ein Gedi which was nice. I liked that we avoided the big 'glitzy' hotels on the dead sea and while it wasn't luxurious it was very comfortable. Plus, it was interesting to learn more about kibbutz life which is a big part of the culture in Israel and we were close to the Ein Gedi spa where we took a dip in the dead sea. We stayed ...



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