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74

I understand that logic doesn't always help in times of stress, but the first thing I want to assure you is that people are not going to run off with your things. This is something we all worry about but that essentially never happens. The folks who manage the checkpoint are monitoring and your things are not out there without you for more than a few seconds....


33

Whenever you're planning a journey, consider if you really have to fly. I am Asperger myself, and I avoid flights (although not for the exact same reason as you). Between The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, there is absolutely no need to fly. There are three ferry links from The Netherlands to England: one to the south, one to the centre, and one to ...


19

In the US, the TSA has a notification card and You or your traveling companion may consult the TSA officer about the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process. The UK security process is not as clear, but https://www.gov.uk/airport-rights outlines the rights of disabled people at the airport. This website suggests Contact ...


16

What you want here is the Avoiding stairs Tube guide, linked from the TfL Accessibility guides page. In this guide you will see that all the Heathrow stations, as well as King’s Cross St. Pancras, are marked with Lift access between street and platform, and additionally all have the Platforms with designated level access boarding point indication, which ...


11

I can't speak about other countries, but in the USA, contact TSA at the airport ahead of time and describe your issues. Most likely they will arrange for a TSA agent to escort you through security. You'll still have to do everything you would normally have to do (show ID, take off shoes, scan luggage, etc.), but the escort will bypass the lines and get you ...


9

Since your parking venue in Fusina is Parcheggio custodito 24h, you probably have a simple solution, at least to solve the Blue Badge problem. Make a photocopy of your Blue Badge, and take the original and the photocopy to the car park attendant. Since the car park is staffed 24 hours per day, you can ask them to check your original and then annotate the ...


9

tl;dr: In theory no, in practice yes. Most national monuments (e.g. Louvre, Musee d'Orsay, ...) are managed by the same organization and likely they stick to the same rules. I assume this is similarlay valid for other sights (e.g. Eiffel tower). In theory: The Louvre page on admissions states that entrance is free for disabled visitors and their ...


8

The formal document to be recognized as a disabled person in France can be obtained here : https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F2446 Obviously, this is not a realistic option for a traveler. Nevertheless, someone sitting in a wheelchair will be considered as a disabled person, and no one will try to check whether he/she is really disabled (...


7

Just looked it up on Transport for London's Journey Planner for Heathrow to King's Cross with Full step free access and TfL recommends taking the Heathrow Express to Paddington and then the Circle Line to King's Cross. Without Full step free access TfL recommends taking the tube straight to King's Cross via the Piccadilly line.


6

Which Stations Are Accessible? TMB says that all the Metro network is wheelchair accessible, except for a few stations (15 out of 156). These tend to be the older/non-recently-refurbished stations. The Barcelona Metro map lists them: This website lists all the stations with lifts. Locating Lifts TMB also says that you can locate accessible stations ...


6

They will also ask you to take your hands out of your pockets when going through the scanner, so maybe the inside of your pocket is not the best place to keep a plushy? Maybe you can make something that becomes an "accessory" that you can wear on the outside, for example a string/cloth hanging from a beltloop? From my many flight experiences, I've developed ...


5

You could do a lot worse than the Captain Cook Hop-On, Hop-Off Cruise. The ferries are all wheelchair-accessible and there's some basic guide-style commentary as well. The list price for the all-you-can-ride 24 hour pass is also $40 per head, but they've got good deals with many attractions so you can get, for example, the pass and Sydney Tower or Sea Life ...


5

There are some paths which are deliberately maintained as Easy Going Trails and intended to be wheelchair-accessible. For the ones within the Sheffield area of the Peak District, you can send off for the council's Easy Going Trails Booklet: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/roads/travel/walking/prow/easy-going-trails.html .


5

I recommend going to Creux du Van, Canton of Neuchatel, Switzerland. It is not in the Alps, but in Jura. Tt is very close to 100% sure you see an Ibex there. They normally don't flee there, cause you are standing above them on the cliff and they are at least 15 meter below you. And they know you cannot get there And the best: you can drive by car to the ...


4

I went to numerous museums in Venice (and Florence and Verona) last summer with a friend in a wheelchair, and she was never asked for documentation at any of them. Simply being in a wheelchair was proof enough.


4

If you cannot walk, you will not be able to get there; the lac is in the middle of the mountains. The closest you can get by car would be Verbier, it is a ski town, and get as high as possible with a ski lift (chairlift or cabin) and see if you can walk around a "little bit". As to seeing the animals, good luck, I imagine that even for experienced trekkers ...


4

There are three things I'm going to suggest: Ask for assistance at check-in. They are able to assist people with various disabilities, they may be willing to assist you. It is worth trying. People in both the Netherlands and the UK seem very nice and understanding, you get a chance. Try to get yourself eligible for the fast track. The security at fast ...


4

The Osaka City Transport Station Guide to the rescue! Japanese only, but the station diagrams and their elevator icons are pretty self-explanatory. In both cases the red lines represent the Midosuji Line. Click on the 駅構内図を膨大 button in the top right corner to view expanded PDFs. Shin-Osaka: has elevators both to platform and street level Tennoji: also ...


3

SFO has multiple terminals with separate secure areas. Since there are multiple exits, they have signed "meeting points" for different gates. The staff assisting will deliver the passenger to that point at least (although most that I've worked with will assist and take the passenger to baggage arrival as well if requested). I did this about 12 months ago. ...


3

I think you should look for the disabled metro map, which is easily to find on google. I would explain more but I think the image says pretty much all. You will have to zoom to read which stations have "annoying stairs" and stations with elevator. About the steps that separate the ticket barriers and the platform, you can't really know, but I highly ...


2

An easier solution is to charge your phone in your car. You probably have a USB charging cable for your phone. Some newer cars are equipped with a powered USB port for this purpose; if not, you can get a USB adapter to plug into your car's 12V cigarette adapter. (Image credit: Markus Bärlocher via Wikimedia, public domain) Note that you probably want ...


2

You could always check your luggage in to the hold, and collect it at the other end. If you limit what you carry to just the items you actually need during the flight (passport, boarding pass, plush seem like the minimum), then you will minimize the stress of going through security. Consider taking disposable forms of entertainment / time killers on the ...


2

Passengers using wheelchairs are requested to approach a station staff member. One or more ticketing gate will be wider than the normal ones for wheel chair access and for large baggage. The staff member will escort you to the platform and help you get on the train and call ahead to the station so that someone would be waiting with another ramp to help you ...


2

Schiphol is well equipped for travel in a wheelchair. Most flights have level entrance and where there are stairs there are also lifts you can use. All the ones before boarding without needing to wait for staff. When needed there are lifts for those planes where most people walk up stairs, (but I guess a flight to Willemstad will not use bus transport to ...


1

Firstly traveling in a wheelchair is a lot better than with crutches, the crutches can be fixed to the back of the chair and then taken on the flight to use mid-flight if needed. There may be time where you need to stand for over 30 minutes with nowhere to sit in an airport. You need to inform the air line ideally at time of booking the flight. However ...


1

You can rent wheelchairs, scooters and walkers in many cities in Germany on: https://meinhilfsmittel.de/en (Note: I am one of the developers of the site, if you have any question feel free to ask :)



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